Purchase College Catalog  2023 - 2024

Contents

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President’s Welcome

Purchase College is a place where creativity happens everywhere and where Think Wide Open isn’t just a slogan, it’s a clarion call and a way of life.


Purchase College

Founded in 1967 as part of the State University of New York comprehensive system, Purchase College was the fulfillment of Governor Nelson Rockefeller’s vision to create a learning community which combined professional conservatory programs in the performing and visual arts with rigorous studies in the liberal arts and sciences.

This vision continues to be the guiding force in our quest to provide an exceptional educational experience.

We are grateful to our many alumni and community members who support the college through scholarships, professorships, and distinguished programs. We will continue to provide access to scholarship and creativity to meet the needs of all of our constituents.

Purchase College is a vibrant, dynamic and diverse community. Join us here on campus, or virtually, and explore the many opportunities for engagement and leadership. Resources for learning and personal growth abound. Attend a performance, exhibition, or lecture; get involved and enjoy the rewards of making a difference.

Purchase welcomes you to Think Wide Open!

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About Purchase College

Mission, Vision, Values

Purchase College, SUNY embraces its public mission by bringing together students in the liberal arts, sciences, and conservatory arts programs in a vibrant, creative community where in-depth knowledge grows from open-minded engagement, questioning boundaries, and inspiring possibility.

Vision

Purchase College will be a model teaching institution where creativity, boldly applied across and within disciplines, serves as a critically needed response to the challenges of increasing complexity, by empowering future generations of artists, scholars, scientists, and activists to engage in and make their own meaningful contributions to society.

Values

The Purchase College community values:

  • Delivering an exceptional education to a diverse student body
  • Artistic and scholarly achievement
  • Personal and professional creativity, inquiry, and expressiveness
  • Openness to emerging ideas that promote alternatives and variance
  • Free and expressive speech
  • Diversity, equity, and inclusion
  • Respect for individuals’ liberties
  • Lifelong learning
  • Meaningful collaboration toward shared goals
  • Civic engagement
  • Sustainability (environmental, social justice, economic, health related, etc.)

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Institutional Learning Outcomes

Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs) are the knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes that students are expected to develop as a result of their overall experiences throughout their time in college. ILOs are designed to help guide individual departments and disciplines in the development of learning outcomes for their programs, courses and services, and to help shape decision-making processes across the college.

Recognizing the interconnectedness and complexity of all facets of our world, we commit to sustaining an environment of openness and collaboration in which students develop:

  • Critical thinking skills, so that they are able to engage a lifelong building of knowledge through observation, reflection, curiosity, dialogue, and the evaluation and synthesis of information.
  • Creative and expressive skills, so that they may propose innovative solutions to problems, and innovative manifestations of their own thoughts and feelings.
  • Articulation skills, so that they are able to communicate their thoughts and choices clearly, carefully, and purposefully, to themselves and to others.
  • Adeptness in multiple research methodologies and in multiple forms of literacy, so that they may further expand and enrich their appreciation of the complexity of our world, within and beyond college.
  • A sensitivity to nuance, to traditional and non-traditional knowledges, and to ideas and experiences different from their own, so that they are able to bridge the gap between themselves and others, and between the local and global, while advocating for the importance of diversity in all its manifestations.
  • A commitment to the planet and to the welfare and equity of all of its peoples, by respecting the sanctity of the environment and by using the United Nations’ 17 interconnected Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a framework for understanding the larger impact of their actions and decisions, so that they may actively engage in building a world that measurably promotes equity, inclusivity, and sustainability.

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Academic Programs Overview

  • Purchase College combines, in one college and on one campus, four distinctive yet interacting academic foci: film and media studies, humanities, the natural and social sciences, and the performing and visual arts.

    As of this year, the college offers:

    • 50 undergraduate majors, 33 minors
    • 5 graduate programs
    • post-baccalaureate performers certificates and post-master’s artist diplomas in music
    • numerous internship and study abroad opportunities

    Approximately 70 percent of the matriculated students at Purchase College are enrolled in the BA, BS, and MA programs; the remaining 30 percent are enrolled in the BFA, MusB, MM, and MFA programs. In response to our rapidly changing global society, the college is continuing to develop integrative and interdisciplinary programs as well as innovative opportunities for international and online studies.

    Detailed information on the Purchase College School of the Arts and School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, their academic units, and the programs offered is available in the Academic Programs and Courses section of this catalog. In addition, Purchase College has one of the largest and most diverse continuing education programs in the State University of New York system. Continuing Education offers both credit-bearing and noncredit courses for adults, college students, and eligible high school students; Professional certificate programs; And noncredit programs in the arts for children and teens.

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Additional Information

Campus Overview

Campus in fall

Stand in the middle of campus and you’re 30 miles north of midtown Manhattan, but with nature as far as the eye can see.

Tucked away on a 500-acre former estate in Westchester County, our unique sprawling campus was designed by master architect Edward Larrabee Barnes. Almost all the buildings on the Purchase campus are the same color. Why is that? Well, there’s a historical reason and a metaphorical one.

The Story Behind the Brick

Our campus master plan relied upon several highly renowned architects to design the buildings on the Main Plaza. To unify these diverse structures and bring coherence to the campus, the architects were required to use the same shade of brick.

We like to think the consistency and order of the buildings’ facades is offset by the explosively colorful, diverse, and unconventional intellectual and artistic activity that happens inside them. Behind our uniform brick walls are classrooms, laboratories, performance spaces, and studios—those spaces where the real heart of campus can be found.

The Purchase Experience

Life here is hands-on and community-focused. We all pitch in to make Purchase a sustainable and diverse home for creative minds.

We’re DIY meets intellectualism, boundless intensity infused with an inquisitive spirit.

We’d love for you to come see us—schedule a tour and get the rundown from our Admissions Ambassadors.

Purchase College Interactive Map

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Your Right to Know

Higher Education Opportunity Information


The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 contains numerous federal reporting and disclosure requirements for information from various administrative areas of higher education institutions. This website has been created to provide quick access to this information.

To the right are general consumer information subject areas, which provide links to references, reports, and additional details. For related information, please refer to Public Reports, which includes the college’s designated contacts for public institutional data and for the annual campus security report.

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SUNY Board of Trustees

The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the State University of New York. It consists of 18 members, 15 of whom are appointed by the Governor, with consent of the NYS Senate. The president of the Student Assembly serves as a voting member, and the presidents of the University Faculty Senate and Faculty Council of Community Colleges serve as non-voting members.

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Purchase College Leadership

2023-24

Purchase College Cabinet


Milagros “Milly” Peña

she/her/hers
President


Earnest Lamb, PhD

he/him/his
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Patty Bice

she/her/hers
Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management

Kathleen Farrell

she/her
Chief Human Resources Officer

Mike Kopas

he/him/his
Vice President for Administration

Arletha (Lisa) Miles-Boyce

she/her/hers
Chief Diversity Officer/Title IX and Affirmative Action Officer

Barry Pearson

he/him
Senior Vice President for Intergenerational Learning and Program Planning

Dayton Tucker

he/his/him
Chief of New York State University Police

Amanda Walker

she/her/hers
Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Executive Director of the Purchase College Foundation and Charitable Entities

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 Academic Requirements

 Undergraduate General Education Curriculum

The SUNY General Education curriculum engages all undergraduate students in essential learning, giving them a solid foundation of knowledge and skills that are applicable throughout their various programs of study.

Important Note: Effective Fall 2023, SUNY is implementing a revised General Education program with new Student Learning Outcomes.

For students who first matriculated at Purchase or another SUNY school prior to the fall of 2023, please refer to the Requirements for Students Admitted Prior to Fall 2023. These requirements are also known as the “Core Curriculum Requirements” within the Course Search and student Degree Progress Reports.

For students who matriculated at Purchase on or after Fall 2023, please refer to the Requirements for Students Admitted Fall 2023 and later. These requirements are also known as “General Education 2023” within the course search and student Degree Progress Reports.

These requirements are shared across all 64 SUNY campuses— in other words, meeting a general education requirement at Purchase satisfies that requirement at any SUNY campus, and vice versa. Each SUNY school has the authority to approve their own courses for each area.

Students must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of core curriculum/General Education 2023 in order to fully satisfy the requirements. So, in addition to satisfying each individual area with a minimum of 3 semester hours of credit, they must have completed at least 30 semester hours in total to fully satisfy the core curriculum/general education 2023 requirements.

The student’s advisor and the Registrar monitor each student’s progress toward the fulfillment of requirements; however, the final responsibility for completing the requirements rests with the student. Questions about which set of requirements a students should fall under (i.e. “Core Curriculum Requirements” or “General Education 2023”) should be directed to the Registrar.

 Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS)

  1. Earn a minimum of 120 credits. Of the 120 credits, a minimum number of credits in the liberal arts are required: 90 for the BA, 60 for the BS. A total of 45 credits must be earned in upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) courses. A maximum of 4 physical education credits may be applied toward the degree.
  2. Complete a minimum of 60 credits outside the student’s major.
  3. Complete the General Education requirements.
  4. Complete all requirements for the major.
  5. Earn a minimum 2.0 (C) cumulative GPA at Purchase College.
  6. Complete the health and wellness requirement. (minimum of one credit of physical education).

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) and Bachelor of Music (MusB)

  1. Earn a minimum of 120 credits.
  2. Complete the General Education requirements.
  3. Complete all requirements for the major.*
  4. Earn a minimum 2.0 (C) cumulative GPA at Purchase College.
  5. Complete the health and wellness requirement. (minimum of one credit of physical education). 

*The specific number of credits required for each performing and visual arts major is listed under each major’s academic requirements.

 Graduate Degrees

Master of Arts (MA), Master of Fine Arts (MFA), and Master of Music (MM)

  1. Earn a minimum 3.0 (B) cumulative GPA at Purchase College.
  2. Complete all requirements for the degree.

 Academics Program Descriptions

 School of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The goal of a liberal arts education is to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to critically appreciate, analyze, and resolve problems—both those encountered in the classroom and in society. To achieve this, the liberal arts curriculum is designed so that students are exposed to many fields of study while they gain mastery in a single discipline. Striking the right balance between in-depth study in a narrow area and exposure to a broad array of disciplinary perspectives enhances personal and professional success. Programs are designed to provide students with the concepts and critical thinking abilities necessary to understand, create, and communicate, as well as the requisite analytical skills to work effectively in their chosen fields of study.

Academic Organization

In the liberal arts and sciences at Purchase College, majors, interdisciplinary programs, and numerous concentrations and minors are offered by the School of Film and Media Studies, the School of Humanities, and the School of Natural and Social Sciences. Most undergraduate majors lead to the Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree. A Bachelor of Science (BS) degree is also available in biology, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree is offered in film. In the School of Humanities, the Master of Arts (MA) degree is offered in 20th-century art history.

Interdisciplinary Studies

Within the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, it is possible to major in one of three interdisciplinary BA degree programs: gender studies, Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies, and liberal arts. Students who wish to pursue an individualized program of study that cannot be accommodated within any of the conventional majors can work with faculty members from different departments to create a program of study leading to the BA in liberal arts. In addition, interdisciplinary minors are available in Asian studies, gender studies, global black studies, and Latin American studies.

Departments

Faculty in the liberal arts and sciences are organized by departments—groups of faculty members in the major disciplines. Departments assume major responsibility for the development of specific programs, the determination of program requirements, and student advising. In the case of interdisciplinary programs, faculty from various departments collaborate to provide those functions. When a student is ready to select a major, the appropriate department identifies a qualified advisor for the student. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the requirements of each program. New departments are created to shape and supervise new programs as student needs require and faculty resources permit.

Faculty

Faculty appointments in the liberal arts and sciences are made on the basis of effectiveness in teaching and dedication to undergraduate education, with attention to scholarly accomplishment and to the intellectual breadth essential to implement programs. Of our full-­time faculty, approximately 92 percent hold a doctorate or other terminal degree; Others are award-winning authors, journalists, and filmmakers. In addition to general teaching and advising responsibilities, faculty members guide tutorials and supervise independent research projects and senior theses.

Academic Advising

All students in the liberal arts and sciences have faculty advisors and plan their semester’s work in consultation with these advisors. Students are also strongly encouraged to use the services of the Advising Center. In particular, students who have not declared their major are encouraged to meet with an advisor in the Advising Center for guidance.

 School of Film and Media Studies

Interdisciplinary programs in Film, New Media, Playwriting and Screenwriting, Cinema and Television Studies, and Media Studies combine research and hands-on training, encouraging students to become engaged makers and critical consumers of media.

 Undergraduate Courses

 Cinema and Television Studies

Description:

An Intensive Immersion in the Art of Film and Television

The Cinema and Television Studies major offers students an opportunity for intensive study of the art of film and television through a broad range of courses in history, aesthetics, and cultural critique. The program is carefully structured for students to develop writing, analytical, and research skills culminating in the Senior Project.

In their first year, students take Intro to Cinema Studies I and II, a year-long course dedicated to the history and art of the moving image. As sophomores, students sharpen their skills in visual analysis and historical inquiry. An extensive range of elective courses are offered in topics such as international cinema, television studies, and film.

During their Junior year, students take Junior Seminar which focuses on film and television theory and its implementation in visual analysis and by the time they become seniors, students are ready to do their own research, which culminates into their final showcase of what was learned in their Senior Project.

Interdisciplinary and Rigorous

This interdisciplinary degree program is rigorous and highly selective, with official admission to the program contingent on successful completion of Introduction to Cinema Studies I and II during the freshman year and a qualifying examination in film history and aesthetics, which is given at the end of the freshman year.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general education requirements, all Cinema and Television Studies majors must meet the following requirements (53–54 credits):

  • CIN 1500/Introduction to Cinema Studies I (4 credits)
  • CIN 1510/Introduction to Cinema Studies II (4 credits)
  • One art history course (3–4 credits), chosen from the following or approved by the cinema studies program coordinator:
    ARH 1020/History of Art Survey II
    ARH 1060/Touchstones of Modern Art
    ARH 1070/The Work of Images: The Function of Art in Western Culture
    ARH 2050/Introduction to Modern Art
    ARH 2060/Art Since 1945
  • CIN 3005/Cinema and the Archive (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    CIN 2000/Close Analysis
    CIN 2500/Principles of Montage
  • Five upper-level elective courses in cinema studies* (20 credits total)
    • One of the five elective courses must be a course focused on Television Studies. These courses include:
      • CIN3065/Netflix in Latin America
      • CIN3070/Television Studies
      • CIN3075/History of American Television
      • CIN 3280/Self Documentary
      • CIN3500/Cinema in the Internet Age
      • CIN3875: Environmental Media
      • MSA3020/Reality TV
      • NME3010/Cross-Cultural Video Production

*Learning assistantships, internships and independent studies cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.

  • CIN 3890/Cinema Studies Junior Seminar (4 credits)
  • CIN 4890/Cinema Studies Senior Colloquium (2 credits)
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I (4 credits)
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II (4 credits)

Notes:

  • A grade of B or higher is required in CIN 1500 and 1510.
  • To advance to the sophomore year, students must pass a qualifying examination in film history and aesthetics, which is given at the end of the freshman year.

Effective: 2020-21:

CIN3005/Cinema and the Archive is a required course. Number of upper level elective courses changed from six to five.

Effective Fall 2022:

Students will be able to formally declare Cinema and Television Studies as a major as of Fall 2022.


Faculty

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, University of Rochester
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies and History
    Director, School of Film and Media Studies

    PhD, University of Maryland

  • Lecturer of Cinema Studies
    • PhD, Vanderbilt University
    • MA, University of Leeds (UK)
    • BA, Baylor University
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor 2022-2023
    • BA, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, University of Vermont
    • MA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Brock University, Ontario
    • MA, Ryerson University and York University, Ontario
    • PhD, University of Chicago
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Hunter College, City University of New York
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Liaoning University (China)
    • MA, Beijing Film Academy
    • PhD, University of Chicago

Contributing Faculty

  • Professor of Media Studies
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor 2023-2024
    • BA, Grinnell College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin

Courses

 Television Theory and Practice

Description:

Minor in Television Theory and Practice

The minor in Television Theory and Practice offers students opportunities to write for different television genres, produce documentary and serial television, and critically engage with new developments in the field. Students examine the historical and theoretical foundations of the medium, and they collaborate in creating content with an emphasis on community-centered media.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Television Theory and Practice

Total Number of Credits: 18-20

  • CIN 1040/Television Culture and Politics, 4 credits (must be taken before the other requirements can be satisfied)
  • Two Theory Electives from the list below: 8 credits
    • CIN 3065/Netflix in Latin America, 4 credits
    • CIN 3070/Television Studies, 4 credits
    • CIN 3075/History of American Television, 4 credits
    • CIN 3500/Cinema in the Internet Age, 4 credits
    • CIN 3875/Environmental Media, 4 credits
    • MSA 3020/Reality TV, 4 credits
  • Two Practice Electives from the list below: 6-8 credits
    • FLM 1050/Introduction to Digital Filmmaking, 4 credits
    • FLM 3610/Experimental Workshop, 3 credits
    • FLM 4010/Short Film Production, 4 credits
    • NME 2420/Video Art I, 4 credits
    • NME 3010/Cross-Cultural Video Production, 4 credits
    • NME 3420/Video Art II, 4 credits
    • PSW1050/Introduction to Television Writing, 4 credits
    • PSW 3220/The Writer and the Documentary, 4 credits
    • PSW 3400/The TV Writer’s Room, 4 credits
    • PSW 3500/Writing the Web Series, 4 credits

Note: Effective for new students entering the minor starting in Fall 2022.


 Film

Description:

The BFA film program provides highly motivated and talented students with intensive conservatory training in all aspects of filmmaking. Students develop significant skills in directing, cinematography, editing, production, screenwriting, and film analysis. By the end of the sophomore year, students consult with the film faculty and choose to focus on either narrative, documentary, or experimental film production in their junior year.

The primary emphasis of the BFA program is on writing/directing. At the end of the junior year, however, film majors who have demonstrated exceptional talent in cinematography or screenwriting have the option of specializing in those areas, subject to approval by the program faculty. The faculty’s decision is based on demonstration of the student’s technical and artistic proficiency.

Facilities

Film majors enjoy a high equipment-to-student ratio and have access to fully equipped newly renovated sound stages, a mix studio, an equipment store, state of the art screening rooms, and digital editing studios.

About Our Alumni

More than 85 percent of film program alumni have found work in the film and television industries. These are just a few of our representative alumni: Jessica Brunetto, Ilya Chaiken, Austin Chick, Rocco Caruso, Bob Gosse, Nick Gomez, Hal Hartley, Azazel Jacobs, Lesli Klainberg, Dani Michaeli, Whitney Ransick, Jimmie Joe Roche, Jeffrey Schwarz, James Spione, and Chris Wedge.

Updated 9-22-20

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all film majors must complete the following requirements (104–106 credits, outlined below by year) and maintain the department standards for academic and professional conduct.

Effective Fall 2022 for new students entering the program.

Requirements for the major include:

  1. A minimum of 24 credits in film history, criticism, and/or theory: CIN 1500 and 1510 plus four additional courses
  2. Satisfactory completion, as determined by the Film faculty, of the 16-credit senior thesis film

Note: Criteria for advancement also include the student’s fitness and potential for a professional life in the field, as determined by the department faculty. Advancement each year is by invitation of the faculty, following a scheduled, mandatory review of each student’s work. Any student on warning or probationary status is reviewed at the end of the semester (fall or spring). There is an ongoing assessment of professional growth in all work for all students.


Faculty

  • Lecturer of Film

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Film
    • AAS, Queensborough Community College, CUNY
    • BS, York College CUNY
    • MM, New York University
  • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • BA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
    • MFA, Yale University
  • Assistant Professor of Film

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Film
    • BA, Wellesley College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Film

    BA, Brandeis University

  • Lecturer of Screenwriting and Film
    Media Manager

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Film
    • BA, Vassar College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Film
    • BA, University of Notre Dame
  • Lecturer, Film
    • BA, New York University
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film

    BA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, University of Rochester
  • Lecturer of Film
    • AA, Seattle Central Community College
    • BA, The Evergreen State College
  • Lecturer of Film

    AB, Harvard University

  • Lecturer of Film
    • BS, Utica College
    • MFA, City College of New York
  • Lecturer of Film

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Assistant Professor of Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • EdM, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Associate Professor of Film

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Film
    • Film Production, UCLA
    • International Development Studies, UCLA
    • Visual Communication, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Film

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Film and Cinema Studies
    Dean for Global Strategy and International Programs and Director of the Center for Engagement
    • BA, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • MA, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
    • MPhil, PhD, Yale University
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Hunter College, City University of New York
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Liaoning University (China)
    • MA, Beijing Film Academy
    • PhD, University of Chicago
  • Lecturer of Acting
    • BFA, New York University
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor 2022-2023
    • BA, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Courses

 Film/Video Production

Description:

Minor in Film/Video Production

The minor in film/video production is designed for students who want to integrate production skills with their major. After completing two foundation courses in screenwriting and basic digital production, students take specialized courses in narrative and documentary, or experimental filmmaking. The final capstone course allows students to spend an entire semester developing a single film project of their choice.

Students should have attained sophomore status (or completed a total of 32 credits) before signing up for this minor. It is ideal for students who are interested in pursuing a senior project that involves a film or video.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Film/Video Production

Five courses, as follows:

  • FLM 1050/Introduction to Digital Filmmaking
  • PSW 1010/Screenwriting I
  • One of the following two-course sequences:
    • FLM 3025/Documentary Filmmaking and FLM 3050/Directing the Scene
    • FLM 3460/Documentary Workshop and 3620/Experimental Workshop
  • FLM 4010/Short Film Production


Additional elective courses:
CIN 2200/Music Video and Popular Culture
CIN 2500/Principles of Montage
CIN 3040/Film Sound: Technique and Theory
NME 3010/Cross-Cultural Video Production
PSW 3120/The Writer and the Documentary
PSW 3400/The TV Writer’s Room
PSW 3500/Writing the Web Series

For course descriptions, go to:
CIN prefix: Cinema and Television Studies
FLM prefix: Film
NME prefix: New Media
PSW prefix: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Notes:

  • CIN 1100, being replaced in fall 2018 by FLM 3050, satisfies the requirement for FLM 3050.
  • COM 1400/Introduction to Video Techniques and Technology, offered by the School of Liberal Studies may be taken in lieu of FLM 1050.
  • COM 3320/Documentary Production, offered by the School of Liberal Studies may be taken in lieu of FLM 3025.

 Media Studies

Description:

In the media studies program, students learn how to combine cultural theory, critical cultural production, and do-it-yourself (DIY) aesthetics to explore the roles that media technologies and the arts play in everyday life.

Creative practices are approached historically and ethnographically, and considered within their rich cultural, geographic, and political economic contexts. This includes students’ own low-cost, open-ended, and tactical DIY productions, such as mashup advertisements, sound installations, and performance art—practices of experimentation, protest, and speculation that engage contemporary social concerns.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, students majoring in media studies must complete a minimum of 10–11 courses with a grade of C or higher and an 8-credit senior project (40 credits minimum total) as follows:

  • MSA 1050/Introduction to Media Studies (3 credits)
  • MSA 2200/Media Institutions and Forms (3 credits)
  • MSA 3400/Critical Perspectives on Media, Society, and the Arts (4 credits)
  • MSA 3450/Research Methods in Media, Society, and the Arts (4 credits)
  • Three electives (at least 9 credits total)
  • One course in art history (visual or performing) or media history (at least 3 credits)
  • Two or three courses in studio art and/or media production (at least 6 credits total)
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I (4 credits)
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II (4 credits)

Minor requirements:

The minor in media studies is designed to provide students with a broad knowledge and understanding of theories and methods of analysis of media and the arts, while at the same time allowing for skill development in an art form.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the Chair of the media studies program.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Media Studies

  • MSA 1050/Introduction to Media Studies (3 credits)
  • Three electives; at least two of these must be taught by faculty in the Media Studies Department (9–12 credits)
  • At least 4 credits in studio art and/or media production courses

Faculty

  • Professor of Anthropology
    Director of Natural and Social Sciences
    • BA, Yale University
    • MIA, Columbia University
    • PhD, Stanford University
  • Professor of Media Studies and Anthropology
    • BA, University of Chicago
    • MA, New School for Social Research
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Stony Brook University, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Professor of Media Studies
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor 2023-2024
    • BA, Grinnell College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Associate Professor of Media Studies and Anthropology
    • BA, Hampshire College
    • MA, University of Washington
    • PhD, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Media Studies
    • MA, McGill University
    • PhD, University of Minnestota, Twin Cities

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BA, Brown University
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Professor of Sociology
    • BA, MA, University of New Orleans
    • PhD, New School for Social Research
  • Associate Professor of New Media and Graphic Design
    Doris and Carl Kempner Distinguished Professor 2023-2025
    • BS, MS, Middle East Technical University (Turkey)
    • MA, PhD, New School for Social Research
  • Associate Professor of Anthropology
    • BA, Trinity College
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, Columbia University
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology
    • MA , Brooklyn College
    • MPhil,Goldsmiths College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin

Courses

 New Media

Description:

The New Media B.A. Program at Purchase College offers an interdisciplinary curriculum that lies at the intersection of art, society, and technology. Students study the effects of digital media from multiple perspectives, giving them the tools to be well-rounded citizens in an increasingly complex society and allowing them to develop their own voice through guided research and hands-on production.

In this program students learn about current technology and acquire the knowledge and skills needed to understand forthcoming technologies, not least in relation to key social and historical contexts. The program’s strong liberal arts component provides students with critical and conceptual frameworks which, when combined with the acquisition of practical skills, help to prepare them for the workforce and/or graduate study.

Courses are drawn from the visual and performing arts, computer science, the social sciences, and other liberal arts disciplines. Students majoring in New Media are offered a structured, well-rounded foundation covering a range of methodologies and content areas, with analysis and production often present within the same course. Collaboration is particularly encouraged, as are experimental and creative approaches to media production and distribution. Each semester the New Media program and the Neuberger Museum of Art co-host a series of lectures and workshops by accomplished artists, technologists, and theorists in the field of new media.

Advanced Standing and the Senior Project

After applying for and receiving advanced standing, new media majors pursue a program of upper-level study designed by the student. This provides students with the opportunity to pursue individual interests while at the same time developing a focus in new media. As part of this program of study, all students are expected to complete an 8-credit senior project, which is supervised by a faculty member of the New Media Department. Various types of senior projects are acceptable, and collaboration among students is encouraged.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all new media majors must complete the following requirements (64–70 credits):

Freshman and Sophomore Years (Foundation): 30–31 credits

Students must earn a grade of C+ or higher in each of these courses. Those who earn a grade lower than a C+ must petition the New Media Department to retake the course. To pass NME 2100, students must attain at least a 2.67 (B-) GPA in the foundation courses. In any given semester, students should not enroll in more than three foundation courses and we recommend against taking more than two studio or lab courses.

  • PHO 1100/Introduction to Digital Photography: 4 credits
  • MSA 1050/Introduction to Media Studies: 3 credits
  • NME 1060/Introduction to Sound: 3 credits
  • NME 1160/Design Principles: 4 credits
  • NME 1450/Programming for Visual Artists: 4 credits or MAT 1520/Computer Science I
  • One 2000-level technoculture course (3 credits), chosen from the following or approved by the student’s faculty advisor; it should be taken after MSA 1050 has been successfully completed: – MSA 2235/Computers and Culture – NME 2250/Art and Technology
  • NME 2420/Video Art I: 4 credits
  • NME 2750/Introduction to the Web: 4 credits
  • NME 2100/New Media Advanced Standing: 1 credit

After Passing Advanced Standing

After being accepted for advanced study, requirements are as outlined below. Students must earn a grade of C+ or higher in each of these courses, excluding the senior project.

  • one upper-level history/theory course: 3–4 credits
  • one anthropology/sociology course: 3–4 credits
  • four elective courses chosen for their relevance and applicability to the student’s course of study in new media: 12–16 credits
  • and the synthesis courses, taken in the junior and senior years (16 credits, plus an optional internship):
    • NME 3880/Junior Seminar in New Media: 4 credits
    • NME 3995/Internship in New Media (optional): variable credits
    • NME 4880/Senior Seminar I in New Media: 2 credits
    • NME 4890/Senior Seminar II in New Media: 2 credits
    • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
    • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BA, Brown University
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Assistant Professor of New Media
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, Transart Institute, University of Plymouth (UK)
  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BFA, San Francisco Art Institute
    • MFA, University of California, Davis
  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BFA, Nova Scotia College of Art & Design
    • MFA, University of California, Berkeley
  • Lecturer of New Media
    New Media Technician
    • BFA, Icelandic College of Art and Crafts (Reykjavik)
    • MFA, Concordia University (Montreal)
  • Associate Professor of New Media and Graphic Design
    Doris and Carl Kempner Distinguished Professor 2023-2025
    • BS, MS, Middle East Technical University (Turkey)
    • MA, PhD, New School for Social Research
  • Lecturer of New Media
    • BA, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
    • MFA, Yale University
  • Lecturer, New Media

    MS, Pace University

  • Assistant Professor of New Media
    Digital Photography Instructional Support Specialist
    • BFA, MFA, Parsons the New School for Design
  • Assistant Professor of New Media
    • BA, Tufts University
    • BFA, School of the Museum of Fine Arts
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BA, Wesleyan University
    • MFA, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Lecturer of New Media
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of New Media and Computer Science
    • BA, Brandeis University
    • MFA, University of California, Los Angeles

Contributing Faculty

  • Professor of Sculpture
    • BA, Bates College
    • MFA, School of Visual Arts
  • Professor of Media Studies
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor 2023-2024
    • BA, Grinnell College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Stony Brook University, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Lecturer of Sculpture
    • BFA, Pratt Institute
    • MPS, New York University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • MA, PhD, Stanford University
  • Professor Emerita of Mathematics/Computer Science
    • SB, University of Chicago
    • MA, Columbia University
    • PhD, New York University
  • Associate Professor of Art History
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MA, University of Iowa
    • PhD, University of Southern California

Courses

 Playwriting and Screenwriting

Description:

Professional writers increasingly work in multiple modes of expression. In the playwriting and screenwriting BA program at Purchase College, students learn to write for both the stage and the screen through studies that engage with these disciplines at the introductory through advanced level. After the foundation courses, writers can choose to continue to study both playwriting and screenwriting or to focus exclusively on one craft.

The curriculum helps students develop a sophisticated eye and gain a deeper understanding of the art and craft involved in making theatre and film. Being at Purchase means a professional approach—working alongside talented film and theatre majors, actors, theatre designers, musicians, visual artists, and dancers in a world-renowned artistic community few other schools can provide. The college’s proximity to New York City provides a distinct advantage: students are taught by industry professionals and have access to all the culture and excitement the city has to offer, and to theatre, film, and television production facilities for their studies and internships. The affordability of Purchase is vital to the economic freedom needed in pursuing a career as a dramatic writer.

The program includes required and elective courses in playwriting and screenwriting; theatre and film history; writing for television, new media, and documentaries; and directing for both stage and screen. Because playwriting and screenwriting are performance arts, students are encouraged to present their work to an audience as much as possible. In their final year, students work with a faculty mentor to develop a substantial senior project: a full-length play, feature-length screenplay, teleplay, or documentary script. Other courses provide the student with portfolio materials in the form of writing samples, both on the page and short works on the screen.

This BA program also provides a solid foundation in the liberal arts, with majors required to complete a minor in a non-theater/film related field of study. This still leaves plenty of room for students to explore other interests, including study abroad programs—all of which enriches their sensibilities as dramatic writers.

The program also offers a minor in playwriting and a minor in screenwriting, open to students in all disciplines.

Note for Transfer Students

Students interested in transferring from another school into this BA program and earning the degree in four semesters (entering as a junior) should be aware that they must have already taken:

  • introductory screenwriting
  • introductory playwriting
  • at least one semester of either theatre or cinema history (recommended)

Junior transfers must register for PSW 2000 and 2010 in their first semester.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all playwriting and screenwriting majors must meet the following requirements (74 credits):

Foundation courses: 23 credits

  • PSW 1000/Playwriting I: 4 credits*
  • PSW 1010/Screenwriting I: 4 credits*
  • CIN 1030/History of Film Art: 4 credits
  • PSW 2000/Screenwriting II: 4 credits
  • PSW 2010/Playwriting II: 4 credits
  • THP 2885/Theatre Histories I or THP 2890/Theatre Histories II: 3 credits

*Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in PSW 1000 and PSW 1010 in order to continue in the sequence to PSW 2000 and PSW 2010, respectively.

Electives: 17 credits**

Students choose their electives in consultation with their faculty advisor. At least 10 of the 17 credits must be upper level. Courses in the list of examples are subject to change, and new courses may be added.

**A minimum grade of C- is required for any elective pre-requisites.

Synthesis courses: 14 credits

  • PSW 3880/Junior Seminar: 4 credits***
  • PSW 4880/Senior Colloquium in Playwriting and Screenwriting: 2 credits
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

***A minimum grade of C- is required in the Junior Seminar as pre-requisite for the Senior Project.

Minor Requirements: 20 Credits

Students must complete a minor in an approved area of study in Liberal Arts and Sciences, after consultation and approval from their advisor. Excluded from the list of approved minors are: Arts Management, Film/Video Production, Music, Theatre and Performance, Creative Writing, Communications and Visual Arts.

For students declaring an additional major in one of the approved fields, the minor requirement is waived. In certain circumstances students may be approved to take an alternate course of study in lieu of the minor, in consultation with their advisor.

Playwriting and Screenwriting Double Majors

All Playwriting and Screenwriting double majors are required to take Junior Seminar in either playwriting or screenwriting. However, if a double major’s senior project is focused only in their second area of study (not Playwriting and Screenwriting), the Playwriting and Screenwriting Senior Project and Senior Colloquium are not required.

Minor requirements:

The college also offers separate Minors in Playwriting and Screenwriting.


Faculty

  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BFA, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University
    • MFA, Hunter College, City University of New York

  • Associate Professor of Practice in Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Playwriting

    BFA, MFA, New York University

  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BA, Yale University
    • MA, New York University
    • MFA, Brooklyn College
  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer, Screenwriting
    • BA, Purchase College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Screenwriting and Film
    Media Manager

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Associate Professor of Screenwriting
    • BA, City College of New York
    • MFA, Yale School of Drama
  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BA: Brown University
    • MSt: New College, University of Oxford
    • MFA: Hunter College
  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BA, Emerson College
    • MFA, Brown University
  • Lecturer of Playwriting and Screenwriting
  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BA, Nanjing University
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer, Playwriting
    • BA, Princeton College
    • MFA, Hunter College
  • Lecturer of Screenwriting
    • BA, Tufts University
    • BFA, School of the Museum of Fine Arts
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BA, Weslyan University

  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, University of Southern California
  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer of Playwriting

    MFA, National University of Theatre and Film, Bucharest

  • Lecturer, Playwriting
    • BA, University of California at Santa Barbara
    • MFA, Actor’s Studio Drama School
  • Lecturer, Screenwriting

    BA, University of California Santa Barbara

  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BA, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Seattle University
    • MFA, Bennington College
  • Assistant Professor of Screenwriting

    MFA, University of Texas, Austin

  • Lecturer of Theatre and Performance
    Director of New Plays Now

    BS, New York University

  • Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film

    BA, Purchase College, SUNY

Contributing Faculty

  • Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MFA, New York University

Courses

 Playwriting

Minor requirements:

The minor in playwriting is designed for students in all disciplines who want to explore and develop skills in writing for the stage.

Many students who pursue this minor are majoring in disciplines like theatre and performance, arts management, and gender studies. The skills developed in playwriting complement a liberal arts education.

Students interested in the minor must submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study. Upon admission to the minor, the student will be assigned a minor advisor from the playwriting faculty.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Playwriting

Five courses, to include:

  • PSW 1000/Playwriting I (4 credits)
  • THP 2885/Theatre Histories I or THP 2890/Theatre Histories II (3 credits)
  • PSW 2010/Playwriting II (4 credits)
  • Plus two of the following courses:
    PSW 1250/Plays and Playgoing (4 credits)
    PSW2200/Intersectional Playwriting (4 credits)
    PSW 3155/The Art of Rewriting: Killing our Darlings (4 credits)
    PSW 3200/Playwriting III (4 credits)
    THP 2205/Shakespeare Then and Now (3 credits)
    THP 2885/Theatre Histories I or THP 2890/Theatre Histories II (3 credits)
    THP 3495/Black American Drama (4 credits)
    THP 3525/LGBTQ Drama (4 credits)

Faculty

  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BFA, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University
    • MFA, Hunter College, City University of New York

  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, University of Southern California
  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Seattle University
    • MFA, Bennington College
  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BA, Nanjing University
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Playwriting

    BFA, MFA, New York University

  • Lecturer, Playwriting
    • BA, University of California at Santa Barbara
    • MFA, Actor’s Studio Drama School
  • Lecturer of Playwriting
    • BA, Emerson College
    • MFA, Brown University

 Screenwriting

Minor requirements:

The minor in screenwriting is designed for students in all disciplines who want to explore and develop skills in writing for film and television.

Many students who pursue this minor are majoring in disciplines like cinema studies, media, society, and the arts, creative writing, journalism, or theatre and performance. The skills developed in screenwriting complement a liberal arts education.

Students interested in the minor must submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study. Upon admission to the minor, the student will be assigned a minor advisor from the screenwriting faculty.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Screenwriting

Five courses, to include:

  • PSW 1010/Screenwriting I (4 credits)
  • CIN 1500/Introduction to Cinema Studies I (4 credits)
    or
    CIN 1030/History of Film Art (4 credits)
  • PSW 2000/Screenwriting II (4 credits)
  • Plus two of the following courses:
    PSW 3000/Screenwriting III (4 credits)
    PSW 3120/The Writer and the Documentary (4 credits)
    PSW 3230/Writers’ Scene Workshop (4 credits)
    PSW 3300/Writing for Television (4 credits)
    PSW 3400/TV Writers’ Room (4 credits)
    PSW 3500/Writing the Web Series (4 credits)


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Practice in Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecturer, Screenwriting
    • BA, Purchase College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor of Screenwriting
    • BA, City College of New York
    • MFA, Yale School of Drama
  • Lecturer of Screenwriting

    BA, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting

    BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

 School of Humanities

With small classes, dynamic students, world-renowned guest artists and scholars, and one-on-one work with distinguished faculty, the School of Humanities provides an exceptional liberal arts education at a public institution. You will hone your writing, expand your thinking, encounter the world, and make your mark.

 Undergraduate Courses

 Art History

Description:

The art history BA centers engagement with art—as a material, critical, and social practice—in a curriculum designed to foster students’ curiosity and intellectual growth. The program is committed to the rigorous interrogation of received histories and their relation to entrenched systems of oppression, and to producing scholars equipped to contribute to building a more just world.

The study of art history introduces students to all periods of history and many of the world’s cultures. The program offers study of the various forms of art and architecture: painting, sculpture, graphics, decorative arts, photography, design, and performance. Scholarly approaches to these media emphasize social, cultural, and political history and explore a wide range of interdisciplinary and theoretical methods.

Study on Campus, in New York City, and Abroad

The program is designed to introduce not only subjects but approaches: visual and stylistic analysis, criticism, iconography, historiography, and methodology. Because art history requires the study of original works of art, many courses are supplemented by field trips to museums and art galleries in New York City, just 20 miles south of the Purchase campus. The on-campus Neuberger Museum of Art is also a major resource. Internships and the college’s study abroad programs provide many opportunities for undergraduates to get involved in the art world outside the classroom.

The Junior Year

During the junior year, students select a broad field of study that includes the architecture, sculpture, and painting of one of several periods or areas (e.g., Renaissance, African, or modern). Students are urged to take at least three courses outside art history related to their area of study (e.g., courses in 19th- and 20th-century literature, history, and/or philosophy, if the focus is on the modern period). The Junior Seminar in Art History examines selected approaches to the study of art history by analyzing various interpretations of the work of a single artist.

The Senior Project

The program culminates in a two-semester senior project, in which each student uses the methods of art history in an in-depth project that may take a variety of forms: a research thesis, an exhibition at the Neuberger Museum of Art, or a critical study.

After Graduation

Many alumni choose to pursue their interest in art history through employment at museums and galleries, often earning advanced degrees in art history and museum studies. Other alumni have chosen to work in such fields as art education, film production, publishing and as art handlers and transporters. Still others pursue careers outside of the arts, but find the critical thinking, visual literacy, and subject matter of this field meaningful and useful to their lives and work.

Updated 9-24-20

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all art history undergraduate majors must complete 14 courses and an 8-credit senior project, as follows:

  • ARH 1010/History of Art Survey I
  • ARH 1020/History of Art Survey II
  • ARH 1021/History of Art Survey II Discussion
  • Six specialized art history courses, which must include:
    • ARH 3880/Junior Seminar in Art History
    • One course in the history of art before 1800
  • Two studio courses in the visual arts
  • Three courses in related disciplines and/or a foreign language
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Note: An art history course offered by the School of Liberal Studies may not be used to fulfill requirement 1, 2, 3, or 4 above, but may be used as a general elective.

Internships may also be taken at the Neuberger Museum of Art or at area museums and galleries. Internships can count toward the elective academic requirements for the major.

Art History majors with a particular interest in museums may want to consider the Museum Studies Minor as a supplement to the major.

Minor requirements:

The minor in art history is designed for undergraduate students in all disciplines at Purchase College who are interested in art history and visual culture.

Students interested in pursuing this minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. Upon admission to the minor, the student is assigned a minor advisor from the art history faculty.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Art History

Six courses in art history, as follows:

  • ARH 1010/History of Art Survey I
  • ARH 1020/History of Art Survey II
  • ARH 1021/History of Art Survey II Discussion
  • Three specialized art history courses (2000 level or above)

Note: Art history courses offered by the School of Liberal Studies may not be used to fulfill these requirements.


Faculty

  • Lecturer of Art History
    • BA, University of Albany, SUNY
    • MA, University of Illinois
    • PhD, University of Bradford
  • Alex Gordon Curator of Art of the Americas, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • MA, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
    • BA, MA, PhD, University of Montreal
  • Lecturer of Art History
    • BA, MBA, PhD, New York University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BS, Wheelock College
    • MDiv, Harvard University
    • PhD, Emory University
  • Associate Professor of Art History
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MA, University of Iowa
    • PhD, University of Southern California
  • Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Fordham University
    • MA, City of College of New York
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Director, Neuberger Museum of Art
    Associate Professor of Art History (on leave)
    • BA, Tufts University
    • MA, George Washington University
    • PhD, Rutgers University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • MA, PhD, Stanford University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, Hampshire College
    • MA, PhD, Boston University
  • Lecturer of Art History
  • Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Harvard University
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Painting and Drawing
    • BA, Princeton University
    • MA, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London
    • MFA, Rhode Island School of Design

Courses

 Graduate Courses

Art History Graduate Program, MA

Description:

The MA program in modern and contemporary art, criticism, and theory offers a unique and interdisciplinary program that centers engagement with art—as a material, critical, and social practice—in a curriculum designed to train scholars, artists, and museum and gallery professionals in the analytical skills, historical perspective, and theoretical fluency necessary for cultural workers today. Our students learn how art and its institutions have developed over time and acquire the tools to reimagine what they could become.

The program provides an intensive study of contemporary critical and theoretical issues surrounding 20th- and 21st-century artistic practices. During weekly first-year colloquia, students are also introduced to the work of some of the most prominent critics, artists, curators, and historians in the field today. Many courses are supplemented by field trips to museums and art galleries in New York City, just 20 miles south of the Purchase campus. The college’s Neuberger Museum of Art is also a major resource.

Updated 9-24-20

Requirements:

Requirements for the master’s degree in art history include eight courses (32 credits), proficiency in one foreign language, and an 8-credit thesis. A minimum 3.0 (B) cumulative GPA must be earned at Purchase College. The total 40 credit requirement can be completed on a full-time two-year program or part-time three-year program.

MA Required Courses:

  • ARH 5101/Proseminar: Method and Theory in Art History
  • ARH 5325/Master’s Colloquium I
  • ARH 5326/Master’s Colloquium II
  • ARH 5—/One course dealing with art before 1950
  • Four elective courses in art history
  • ARH 5990/Master’s Thesis I: 4 credits
  • ARH 5991/Master’s Thesis II: 4 credits

*Foreign Language proficiency is not a prerequisite and can be completed at Purchase College.

Museum + Curatorial Studies (M+) Option

The Museum + Curatorial (M+) track engages students in object-based research and the study of critical histories of museums and museum practices with an underlying commitment to cultivating more inclusive and accessible institutions and notions of exhibition-making. Building on the required courses for the MA degree in art history, required courses for M+ students include, in the first year, Museology (fall semester) and Critical Curatorial Studies (spring semester). In the second year, students’ coursework will be augmented by workshops, on- and off-campus internships, and the development of an exhibition series based in the Neuberger Museum.

M+ Required Courses:

  • ARH 5101/Proseminar: Method and Theory in Art History
  • ARH 5325/Master’s Colloquium I
  • ARH 5326/Master’s Colloquium II
  • ARH 5—/One course dealing with art before 1950
  • ARH5035/Museology
  • ARH5037/ Critical Curatorial Studies
  • ARH 5025—/Exhibition I*
  • ARH5026—/Exhibition II*
  • ARH 5990/Master’s Thesis I
  • ARH 5991/Master’s Thesis II

*Note: For Academic Year 23-24, students can substitute ARH5065/Curatorial Writing Intensive and ARH5066/Curatorial Digital Literacy for Exhibition I and II.

MA/MFA Academic Requirements

In most cases, obtaining both an MA in Art History (through the School of Humanities) and an MFA in visual arts (through the School of Art & Design) at Purchase College requires three years of in-residence study with a total course load of 98 credits. For successful progress through the program, a 3.0 (B) GPA must be maintained.

First Year: 32 credits

Second Year: 34 credits

Third Year: 32 credits

Notes:

Students must take VIS 5760/Graduate Critical Topics two times.


Faculty

  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • MA, PhD, Stanford University
  • Associate Professor of Painting and Drawing
    • BA, Princeton University
    • MA, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London
    • MFA, Rhode Island School of Design
  • Associate Professor of Art History
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MA, University of Iowa
    • PhD, University of Southern California
  • Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Fordham University
    • MA, City of College of New York
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Lecturer of Art History
    • BA, MBA, PhD, New York University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BS, Wheelock College
    • MDiv, Harvard University
    • PhD, Emory University
  • Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Harvard University
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York

Contributing Faculty

  • Alex Gordon Curator of Art of the Americas, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • MA, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
    • BA, MA, PhD, University of Montreal
  • Associate Professor of Painting and Drawing
    • BA, Princeton University
    • MA, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London
    • MFA, Rhode Island School of Design

Courses

 Undergraduate Courses

 College and Expository Writing

Description:

The ability to express ideas clearly and effectively in writing is essential to success as a student and citizen.

Students learn and practice these skills throughout their academic career at Purchase College, beginning with College Writing (WRI 1110) in their first year.

Student Learning Outcomes/Students will learn to:

  • Produce coherent texts within common college-level written forms;
  • Demonstrate the ability to revise and improve such texts;
  • Research a topic, develop an argument, and organize supporting details;
  • Develop proficiency in oral discourse; and
  • Evaluate an oral presentation according to established criteria.
  • Think critically, by identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments as they occur in their own or other’s work; and develop well reasoned arguments
  • Master information management in order to perform basic operations of personal computer use;
  • Understand and use basic research techniques; and locate, evaluate, and synthesize information from a variety of sources.

College Writing is taught in small sections in a seminar/discussion format that requires students to achieve proficiency in speaking and listening as well as writing and reading.

Entering students may only be exempted from College Writing by achieving an AP score of 4 or higher. For additional information, refer to the college policies.

English as an Additional Language

Courses in English as an additional language (EAL) are also offered under the auspices of the college writing program.


Faculty

  • Visiting Assistant Professor
    Director of College Writing
    • AB, Princeton University
    • JD, New York University School of Law
  • Professor of Music
    • BM, University of Michigan
    • MM, Mannes College of Music
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Hunter College, City University of New York
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, University of Louisville
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BFA, Brown University
    • MFA, City College of New York
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA, Queens College, City University of New York
    • MA, PhD, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Journalism, Western Washington University
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Professor of Practice
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Pennsylvania State University
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
    • MEd, Temple University
    • EdD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Wayne State University
    • MPS, Manhattanville College
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor of College Writing
    • SUNY Purchase, BA Journalism and Screenwriting
    • MFA, The Writer’s Foundry St. Joseph’s University Brooklyn
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, University of Michigan
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA (Honors), University of Delhi (India)
    • MA, MPhil, PhD, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Writing
    Assistant Director, Advising Center

    MusB, MM, Purchase College, SUNY

  • Lecture of Writing

    MFA, Sarah Lawrence College

  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, Yale University
    • MPS, Manhattanville College
  • Associate Professor of Literature and Writing
    Director, School of Humanities

    BA, MA, PhD, Columbia University

Courses

English as an Additional Language

Communications

Description:

This major focuses on crafting messages appropriate to a variety of mediated channels; considering the impact of messages on diverse audiences, and promoting brands, products and companies.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all communications majors must complete the following requirements (35-36 credits):

  1. COM 1500/Intro to Communication: 4 credits
  2. COM 2010/Group Collaboration: 3 credits OR JOU2515/Journalism I, 4 credits (as of Fall 2023)
  3. One of the following courses:
    COM 1400/Intro to Video Techniques and Technology: 3 credits
    COM 2050/Intro to Media Writing: 4 credits
    COM 2020/Visual Communication: 4 credits
  4. COM 3100/Communication Research: 4 credits
  5. COM 3110/Strategic Message Design: 4 credits
  6. Area of Interest: TV Production OR Advertising and Public Relations * (choose from a list of courses below): 12 credits. Out of the 12 credits 8 credits must be upper level.
  7. COM 4800/Senior Capstone: 4 credits

A minimum grade of C- is required for all classes applied towards major requirements.

Areas of Interest


Faculty

  • Assistant Professor of Communications and French
    • BA International Development, Brigham Young University
    • MBA International Administration, Thunderbird School of Global Management
    • MA French Studies, Brigham Young University
    • MA French, Vanderbilt University
    • PhD French, Vanderbilt University
  • Lecturer of Communications
    • BS, Mansfield University
    • MS. Mansfield University
    • MA, Clark University
    • PhD, Clark University
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor of Communications

    MA, University of Amsterdam

  • Assistant Professor of Communications
    • BFA, Rochester Institute of Technology
    • MFA, Hunter College
  • Lecturer of Communications
    • BA, Pace University
    • MA, Pace University
    • PhD, Regent University
  • Lecturer of Communications
    • BA, Hunter College
    • MFA, Hunter College
  • Lecturer of Communications
    • MFA, Brooklyn College, Film and Television Production
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Assistant Professor of Communications
    • BA, Hunter College, City University of New York
    • MS, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
    • PhD, Ohio University

Contributing Faculty

  • Lecturer in Law and Justice Studies
    Lecturer in Communications
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • JD, Touro College
  • Assistant Professor of Arts Management
    • BS, Northeastern University
    • MA, PhD, University of Westminster (England)
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, University of Washington
    • MFA, Hunter College
  • Assistant Professor of Practice in Arts Management
    • BA, Marymount Manhattan College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer of Writing
    • BA, University of Michigan
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College

Courses

 Creative Writing

Description:

The Lilly Lieb Port creative writing program is a highly selective and structured BA program that shares features of the college’s arts programs.

The purpose of this program is to offer motivated, talented, and committed students a dynamic context and community in which to explore all aspects of creative writing.

As an integral part of the program, readings are held each semester by students, faculty, alumni who have published their writing, and professional writers. Editors and other members of the publishing world are also invited to speak and share their expertise with students.

Italics Mine (italicsmine.com), a student-run literary journal under the stewardship of the creative writing program, showcases the talent and diversity of Purchase College students by publishing original art, fiction, poetry, and nonfiction in print and online.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Creative writing majors are encouraged to apply to one of the college’s many study abroad programs. Please contact the Education Abroad Coordinator at study.abroad@purchase.edu for more information.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, creative writing majors must complete a minimum of nine courses and an 8-credit senior project (45–47 credits total) as follows. The foundation courses and the two genre courses must be completed with a grade of B or higher:

  • CWR 1000/Poetic Techniques: 4 credits*
  • CWR 1100/Narrative Techniques: 4 credits*
  • Two courses in the student’s chosen genre (poetry or fiction): 8 credits*
    CWR 2400/Poetry Writing I and CWR 3400/Poetry Writing II
    or
    CWR 2500/Fiction Writing I and CWR 3500/Fiction Writing II
    *Must be completed with a grade of B or higher.
  • Two upper-level creative writing electives from the list below: 8 credits
    CWR 3200/Art of the Novella
    CWR 3450/ Poets at Work: First Books
    CWR 3110/Writing Home
    CWR 3125/ Alternate Worlds
    CWR 3215 and CWR 3220/ Editing and Production Workshop (year-long sequential course in Editing and Production).
  • Two literature courses, chosen from an approved list: 7–8 credits
  • Arts-related course(s): 3–4 credits
  • CWR 4000/Special Topics in Creative Writing: 3 credits
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Note: Creative writing majors are encouraged to apply to one of the college’s many study abroad programs. Please contact the Education Abroad Coordinator at study.abroad@purchase.edu for more information.

Examples:

Sequence of Study

All creative writing majors follow a sequence of courses, whether their chosen genre is poetry or fiction:

  1. To encourage an awareness of and sensitivity to the various aspects of the craft of creative writing, students are required to take the introductory courses, CWR 1000 and 1100, in their first year of study.
  2. In the second year, poetry students move on to CWR 2400/Poetry Writing I, then to CWR 3400/Poetry Writing II, while fiction writing students take CWR 2500/Fiction Writing I, followed by CWR 3500/Fiction Writing II.
  3. After completing this course sequence, students have the opportunity to study for one semester with a writer-in-residence. In addition, advanced tutorials are available on a regular basis, emphasizing continuous, close work on revision and editing skills. In the most advanced classes, students begin to explore the fiction and poetry market. A component of advanced study may also include experience in editorial and copyediting techniques as preparation for work in the publishing industries.
  4. Students take CWR 4000/Special Topics in Creative Writing in the fall of their senior year, in tandem with the first semester of their senior project.

Effective Fall 2020:

CWR 3200 no longer satisfies the fiction genre course requirement
Arts-Related Courses list expanded beyond upper-level courses


Faculty

  • Professor of Creative Writing
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Professor of Creative Writing
    • BA, Fontbonne College
    • PhD, Florida State University
  • Lecturer, Creative Writing

    BA, Bennington College
    MFA, University of Maryland
    MAR, Yale Divinity School

  • Lecturer, Creative Writing
    • BA, Ramapo College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor of Creative Writing
    • BA, Connecticut College
    • MFA, Purdue University

Courses

 History

Description:

The goal of the history major at Purchase College is to provide students with the intellectual foundation of a liberal arts education that is suitable for a wide variety of professions, including law, education, government, business, journalism, and public relations.

The history curriculum seeks to foster the development of a historical perspective on the forces and processes that have shaped and continue to shape our communities, our country, and the world at large.

In keeping with the cultural resources of our area and the special profile of Purchase, the history program has generally, though not exclusively, emphasized the social, intellectual, and cultural dimensions of the historical discipline.

  • Students may define their area of interest within the major in terms of nine broadly conceived areas.
  • When appropriate, students may also pursue topics of special interest through tutorials and directed independent studies, which may be arranged with individual instructors.
  • Coursework in the history program includes intensive writing and an emphasis on primary source material, which can range from government documents to diaries, novels, and films.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all history majors must complete seven history courses, plus a junior seminar and an 8-credit senior project (37–40 credits total):

  • The broad survey courses at the 2000 level serve as the foundation for more specialized work at the 3000 level.
  • All history majors are required to take the Junior History Seminar in the spring semester of their junior year. This course is open exclusively to history majors.
  • All history majors will be assigned a senior project advisor by the end of their junior year, and are required to register with this advisor for 4 credits of senior project (SPJ 4990/Senior Project I) in the fall of their senior year, and 4 more credits (SPJ 4991/Senior Project II) in the spring of their senior year.

Areas of Interest

  • History majors normally take four or five elective courses that are clustered within an area of special interest to the student. At least three of these courses must be at the upper (3000–4000) level.
  • History majors must also take at least two or three elective history courses outside their area of interest. At least one of these must be at the upper (3000–4000) level.
  • The student’s area of interest within the major should be developed in consultation with a faculty advisor at the beginning of the junior year, and must be approved by the board of study. Normally, a student will select from among the following nine areas:

    1. American history
    2. Ancient and medieval history
    3. Asian studies
    4. Early modern history
    5. European history
    6. Jewish history
    7. Latin American history
    8. Modern history
    9. Women’s history

Summary of Academic Requirements

A total of seven history courses, plus the junior seminar and the 8-credit senior project:

  1. HIS —/Seven history courses as follows (25–28 credits):
    a. Four or five history courses in an area of interest (including three at the 3000–4000 level)
    b. Two or three history courses outside the area of interest (including one at the 3000–4000 level)
  2. HIS 3880/Junior History Seminar (spring semester, junior year): 4 credits
  3. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  4. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Minor requirements:

The minor in history is designed for students who wish to supplement coursework in another major with an array of history courses.

It is particularly suited for students who have an interest in one period or a specific area (for example, early modern or modern history; European, American, or Asian history).

Students interested in the minor should consult with the Department Chair of history and complete an Application for a Program of Minor Study. They will then be assigned an appropriate advisor to help plan their minor program.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in History

At least five courses, three of which must be at the 3000 level or above.

Related Minors:

Asian Studies
Contemplative Studies
Gender Studies
Global Black Studies
Jewish Studies
Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX Studies
Museum Studies


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of History
    • BA, University of Oxford (England)
    • MA, University of Sussex (England)
    • PhD, Yale University
  • Associate Professor of History
    • BA, St. Joseph’s University
    • MA, Fordham University
    • MPhil, PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Professor of History
    • BA, Bryn Mawr College
    • MA, PhD, University of Chicago
  • Professor of History
    • BA, Vassar College
    • PhD, University of Cambridge (England)
  • Assistant Professor of History
    • BA, Emory University
    • MA, The University of Chicago
    • PhD, Johns Hopkins University
  • Lecturer of History
    • BA, International Studies College (Beijing, China)
    • MA, Shanghai Normal University
    • MA, University of Minnesota
  • Associate Professor of History
    • BA, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)
    • PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Lecturer of History
    • BA, MA, Fordham University
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies and History
    Director, School of Film and Media Studies

    PhD, University of Maryland

  • Lecturer of History
  • Lecturer of History
    • BA, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
    • MA, University of Wisconsin- Madison
    • PhD, University of Wisconsin- Madison

Courses

 Jewish Studies

Description:

Jewish Studies courses explore the Bible, the history and archaeology of ancient Israel, the ancient Middle East, Jewish history, Israel studies, Holocaust history, philosophy, literature and Hebrew language.

Course materials extend from antiquity to the contemporary. The approach is interdisciplinary and involves the faculties of History, Literature, and Language and Culture, in the School of Humanities. Students in any discipline may minor in Jewish studies, or students may major in History and choose Jewish history as their area of interest.

This program was originally made possible, in part, by a Challenge Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Minor requirements:

The minor in Jewish studies is designed to provide students with a general introduction to the history and culture of the Jewish people through a combination of courses in Jewish history, literature, and philosophy, and in the Hebrew language.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor after consultation with the Chair of the Jewish studies program.

For students interested in majoring in History with a concentration in Jewish history, please go to the history department.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Jewish Studies

Five courses, selected from Jewish history, Jewish literature in translation, or Hebrew language, in consultation with the Chair of the Jewish Studies program.


Faculty

  • Professor of History
    • BA, Bryn Mawr College
    • MA, PhD, University of Chicago
  • Professor of History
    • BA, Vassar College
    • PhD, University of Cambridge (England)

Courses

 Journalism

Description:

The journalism major at Purchase College is designed to provide students with the intellectual bases and skills to gather, assess, and disseminate information and ideas.

This equips students for careers in journalism and a wide variety of other fields, including law, government, business, and public relations. The program fits naturally in the School of Humanities, as journalism at its best exemplifies the open and honest inquiry that marks the liberal arts and sciences.

Students are offered a central set of skills courses in journalism, electives in specialized areas in a variety of media, and courses that explore the broader context of journalistic practice. Students also take advantage of the broad offerings of Purchase College, and are encouraged to have internships. The studies culminate in a senior project, an extended work that allows students to showcase the full range of their talents.

Facilities

Purchase students produce journalism in a variety of computer labs using equipment consistent with industry standards. Journalism majors work in a dedicated suite in the Humanities Building that offers an integrated newsroom, broadcast studio, and control room with up-to-the-minute technology.

Our proximity to New York City, the media capital of the world, has enabled students to land internships with such varied media outlets as NBC, CBS, ABC, PBS, MSG, Marie Claire, and the Daily News. In essence, we strive to offer our students whatever they need to produce and promote excellent work. Chief among these things is a core set of journalistic practices and principles that remain steady even as the technology changes.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all journalism majors must complete the following:

I. Introductory Courses: 6 credits

These two introductory courses are the only journalism courses open to freshmen.

  • JOU 1500/Introduction to Media: 3 credits
  • JOU 2150/History of Journalism: 3 credits

II. Central Courses: 22 credits

  • JOU 2515/Journalism I: 4 credits*
  • JOU 2915/Journalism II: 4 credits*
  • JOU 3080/Freedom and the Media: 4 credits
  • JOU 3880/Junior Seminar in Journalism: 2 credits
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

*Students must earn a minimum grade of C+ in JOU 2515 and 2915, which must be taken initially and in sequence.

III. Journalism Electives: 10–12 credits

Three journalism electives, chosen from the list below. For students who begin the major from fall 2020 onward, at least one of the three electives must be a practical course in visual journalism (denoted by an asterisk).

Please note: New courses may be added to this list. Students should check with their faculty advisor to determine if a new course is an appropriate elective.

COM 3375/Podcasting and Audio Storytelling
JOU 1120/Journalism and Film
JOU 3040/Race, Gender, and the Media
JOU 3100/Photojournalism*
JOU 3120/First-Person Reporting
JOU 3130/Documentaries and Journalism
JOU 3160/Broadcast News I*
JOU 3170/Broadcast News II
JOU 3200/Feature Writing
JOU 3220/The Art of Sportswriting
JOU 3230/The Beat of Music Journalism
JOU 3350/Community Reporting
JOU 3360/Narrative and Nonfiction Podcasting
JOU 3374/The Literature of Journalism
JOU 3500/Video Journalism I*
JOU 3600/News Editing
JOU 3700/The Beat, Magazine Production
JOU 3780/Criticism/Reviewing Workshop
JOU 4010/Covering the Arts
JOU 4020/International Issues Reporting
JOU 4150/Investigative Reporting
JOU 4320/Broadcast Writing
LIT 3635/Reviewing the Contemporary Novel
PHI 3085/Objectivity

IV. Other Studies

Five electives in one area of study within the liberal arts and sciences, chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor. (Many students will find it appropriate to earn a minor.) The per-course credits vary, but the credit total is typically 18 to 20. A minimum of 9 credits must be upper-level.

Minor requirements:

The minor in journalism is designed for undergraduate students in all disciplines at Purchase College who are interested in the field of journalism.

Students interested in this minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Journalism

Five courses (18–20 credits) are required:

JOU 2515/Journalism I*
JOU 2915/Journalism II*
JOU 3080/Freedom and the Media
JOU —/Two journalism electives

*Students must earn a minimum grade of C+ in JOU 2515 and 2915, which must be taken initially and in sequence.


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    • BA, Brown University
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    • BA, University of Minnesota
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    • BA, American University
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, New York University
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, University of Washington
    • MFA, Hunter College
  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    • BA, MA, Empire State College, SUNY

Courses

Language and Culture

Description:

Knowledge of foreign languages and an awareness of other cultures are of critical importance in today’s world, in which international communication is instantaneous and events taking place at great geographical distances have immediate global repercussions.

The language and culture program offers students the opportunity to acquire fluency in at least one language and to gain familiarity with the society (or societies) in which that language is used. Keeping in step with the increasingly complex interactions among countries, the program also allows students to explore a diversity of cultures through the wide choice of courses that fulfill requirements for the major.

The language and culture major offers a full program in French and Spanish, with opportunities to study Chinese, German, Hebrew, Italian, linguistics, and Portuguese. A course in Nigerian/Hausa language and culture is also available through the anthropology program.

Modern languages are taught through an approach that immediately involves students in oral interactions in the target language, while developing their linguistic and cultural awareness. Beginning French and Spanish courses also include interactive language labs. As students acquire fluency, they are introduced to varied aspects of the language’s cultural context. These include courses in civilization, translation, literature, and history.

Foreign Language Placement

All students are required to complete a foreign language placement exam before enrolling in any language course. Faculty members monitor their class lists to ensure that students have taken the exam and are enrolled in the appropriate level.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the college’s study abroad programs. These interdisciplinary programs include courses that fulfill requirements for the major in language and culture and/or General Education requirements.

Minors in the Language and Culture Program

Students majoring in any discipline may pursue a minor offered by the language and culture program: Chinese, French, Italian, Spanish, and linguistics. Students interested in pursuing any of these minors should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office.

Related Interdisciplinary Minors:

Asian Studies | Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX Studies

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all students majoring in language and culture must complete 40 total credits as listed below:

1. Complete the Translation course in the selected language concentration with a grade of B or higher.

  • SPA3735/Spanish Translation (4 credits)
  • FRE 3735/French Translation (4 credits)

Note: For the French Concentration, if FRE 3735/French Translation is not being offered during a particular year, LAC 3430/An Introduction to Linguistics may be substituted for this requirement if your Advisor permits.

2. Complete Two 3000 level language courses from your chosen concentration below: (8 credits total)

3. Four courses in Hispanic or Francophone culture from your chosen concentration below: (16 credits total)

Note: For the French concentration, the same courses cannot be taken for requirements 2 and 3. For example, if you take FRE3230/The Island as Laboratory, it will fulfill either 2 or 3, and not both.

4. One elective from the list of courses in requirements 2 and 3 that have not been taken or one of the following courses:

5. Complete a two-semester Senior Project with a focus in one of the following areas: (8 Credits)

  • Language Pedagogy: Creating a lesson plan and classroom materials for language instruction and applying pedagogical principals learned in the Methods of Language Teaching class.
  • Translation: Propose a translation for a passage of a novel, film, etc. applying the theory and methodology of translation studies learned in the Translation course.
  • Literature (Hispanic or Francophone): Engage in research on literature and supplement with materials from History, Philosophy, Art History, Political Science, etc. It is encouraged that students write their project in French or Spanish but it is not required.
  • Topics in Hispanic or Francophone Culture: Students may research on topics such as Cinema, Politics and Visual Arts
  • Creative Projects: Students with artistic skills may submit an original work in their genre of choice. The work must reflect Francophone or Hispanic cultures and include an explanatory essay. Approval from an advisor is needed.

Faculty

  • Visiting Instructor
    • MA, Auburn University
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor of Language and Culture

    PhD, Duke University

  • Associate Professor of Language and Culture
    Co-chair of Language and Culture and Coordinator of Linguistics Minor
    • BA, MA, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
    • MA, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
    • MA, PhD, University of Southern California
  • Lecturer of German
    • BA, Humberside Business School (UK)
    • BA, Fachhochschule Münster (Germany)
    • MA, Manhattanville College
  • Associate Professor of Spanish and Literature
    Co-Chair of Language and Culture
    • BA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Lecturer of French
    • Licence-ès-Lettres, Maitrise-ès-Lettres, University of Antananarivo (Madagascar)
    • MA, University of Cincinnati
    • PhD, University of Oregon
  • Lecturer of Spanish
  • Assistant Professor of Communications and French
    • BA International Development, Brigham Young University
    • MBA International Administration, Thunderbird School of Global Management
    • MA French Studies, Brigham Young University
    • MA French, Vanderbilt University
    • PhD French, Vanderbilt University
  • Lecturer of Italian
    • BA, University of Pisa (Italy)
    • PhD, University of Alberta (Canada)
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chinese and Asian Studies

    PhD, NYU

  • Lecturer of Hebrew

    MA, Bar Ilian University and Laura/Alvan Siegal College of Judial Studies

  • Lecturer, Language and Culture
  • Lecturer, Language and Culture
  • Lecturer of Spanish
    • BA, University of Leeds, England

Contributing Faculty

  • Lecturer of Cinema Studies
    • PhD, Vanderbilt University
    • MA, University of Leeds (UK)
    • BA, Baylor University

Courses

Chinese

Description:

The minor in Chinese is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of written and spoken modern Chinese, and to introduce them to the culture, politics, and literature of Asian countries.

Students interested in the minor should submit a complete Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in Chinese after consultation with the appropriate faculty.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Chinese

Five courses (20 credits), as follows:

  • CHI 1010/Beginning Chinese I
  • CHI 1020/Beginning Chinese II
  • CHI 2010/Intermediate Chinese I
  • CHI 2020/Intermediate Chinese II
  • CHI 3010/Advanced Chinese I

Related Interdisciplinary Minor: Asian Studies


French

Description:

The minor in French is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written French and to provide a general introduction to the culture and literature of France and the Francophone nations.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in French after consultation with the Chair of the Language and Culture Department.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in French

Five courses in French (20 credits), as follows:

  • Two courses must be chosen from the following advanced-level French courses:
    • FRE 3015: Advanced French I, 4 credits
    • FRE 3230: The Island as Laboratory, 4 credits
    • LAC 3340: Postcolonial French-Language Literature, 4 credits
  • One course must be in cultural studies and/or translation:
    • ARH 2050: Introduction to Modern Art, 4 credits
    • ARH 3510: 19th Century Art, 4 credits
    • ARH 3630: French Art from LaTour to David, 4 credits
    • HIS 3380: Paris, Vienna, Berlin, 4 credits
    • HIS 2330: Atlantic World, 4 credits
    • CIN 3420: Contemporary European Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3550: Francophone Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3835: André Bazin, Realism, and Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3855: French Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3857: Contemporary French Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 4210: Theory and Praxis: Welles and Resnais, 4 credits
    • FRE3225: Sociolinguistic Issues in the French Speaking World, 4 credits
    • FRE 3735: French Translation, 4 credits
    • LIT 3680: Surrealism and its Legacy, 4 credits
    • PHI 2060: Existentialism, 4 credits
    • PHI 3470: Foucault, Habermas, Derrida, 4 credits
  • The remaining two courses must be chosen from the following courses:
    • FRE 1010: Beginning French I, 4 credits
    • FRE 1020: Beginning French II, 4 credits
    • FRE 2010: Intermediate French I, 4 credits
    • FRE 2020: Intermediate French II, 4 credits
    • FRE 3015: Advanced French I, 4 credits*
    • FRE 3230: The Island as Laboratory, 4 credits*
    • LAC 3340: Postcolonial French-Language Literature, 4 credits*
    • Any other FRE course

*Note: A course taken to fulfill one of the requirements will not also fulfill a second requirement. For example, FRE 3015 can fulfill either requirement #1 or requirement #3, but not both. A minimum of 5 courses (20 credits) must be taken to complete the minor.


Contributing Faculty

  • Lecturer of Cinema Studies
    • PhD, Vanderbilt University
    • MA, University of Leeds (UK)
    • BA, Baylor University

Italian

Description:

Students majoring in any discipline may pursue a minor in Italian, which is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written Italian and a general introduction to Italian culture.


Students who complete the minor in Italian should achieve proficiency in the language equivalent to ITA 2020/Intermediate Italian II. All students interested in Italian are strongly encouraged to participate in the college’s summer study abroad program in Italy.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in Italian after consultation with the Program Chair of the Language and Culture Department.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Italian

Five courses, as follows:

  • ITA 1010/Beginning Italian I
  • ITA 1020/Beginning Italian II
  • ITA 2010/Intermediate Italian I
  • ITA 2020/Intermediate Italian II
  • One elective course related to Italian studies, chosen in consultation with the minor advisor

Spanish

Description:

The minor in Spanish is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written Spanish and a general introduction to the culture and literature of Spain and Latin America.


Students who complete the minor in Spanish should achieve proficiency in the language equivalent to SPA 3015/Advanced Spanish. All students interested in Spanish are strongly encouraged to participate in the college’s summer study abroad program in Spain.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in Spanish after consultation with the Chair of the Language and Culture Department.

Related Interdisciplinary Minor:

Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX Studies

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Spanish

Five courses in Spanish above the level of SPA 1010 and 1020/Beginning Spanish I and II, chosen in consultation with the minor advisor.

Foreign Language Placement


Linguistics

Description:

The minor in linguistics is designed for students who are fascinated by language.


Linguistics investigates language as a self-contained system (sounds, words, sentences), as a component of culture and society, and as a cognitive and neurological operation of individuals. It also intersects with a range of academic disciplines whose subject matter, in one way or another, involves language. Therefore, this minor is particularly valuable for students whose primary field of study is language, sociology, anthropology, music, psychology, philosophy, or literature.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Linguistics

Five courses (19–20 credits), as follows:

  • LAC 3430/An Introduction to Linguistics
  • And four electives, chosen from the following:
    Anthropology:
    ANT 2175/Language, Culture, and Society
    Language and Culture:
    FRE3225/Sociolinguistic Issues in the French Speaking World
    FRE 3730/Translation Theory and FRE 3735/French Translation
    LAC 3000/Syntax and Semantics
    LAC 3360/Methods of Language Teaching (formerly LAC 3350)
    LAC 3400/Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (added Spring 2018)
    SPA 3450/The Structure of Spanish: Grammar, Morphology, and Syntax
    SPA 3730/Translation Theory
    SPA 3735/Spanish Translation
    Philosophy:
    PHI 2120/Methods of Reasoning
    Psychology:
    PSY 3320/Language and Thought
    PSY 3490/Development of Language (added Spring 2018)

Note: FRE 3730 and 3735 count as one elective and must be taken together. Likewise, SPA 3730 and 3735 count as one elective and must be taken together.


Courses

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies

Description:

The major in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies at Purchase College is designed as a multidisciplinary immersion experience that prepares students for life in a globalized world.

Along with an introductory course on Latin American history, students are required to take courses in at least two different disciplines, drawing from courses on or related to Latin America in the social sciences, the humanities, or the arts. All students are required to have or to attain language proficiency, defined as the equivalent of five semesters in Spanish, French, or Portuguese.

Experiential learning is a central and distinctive feature of this major: all students fulfill this requirement by completing a service-learning project or an internship in a local Latin American/Latino community, school, or nonprofit, or through a study abroad program. Students synthesize this experiential learning with the knowledge gained from their coursework in an in-depth, two-semester senior project.

Graduates of this program will be able to demonstrate knowledge of Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx history, geography, cultural traditions and innovations, political structures, and social issues and will possess an in-depth awareness of Latin America’s diversity as well as its role in global processes.

What can you do with a degree in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies?

Opportunities exist in a wide variety of fields, nationally and internationally. In a world that is increasingly transnational and cross-racial, individuals with a solid knowledge of Spanish, French, and/or Portuguese and an understanding of Latin American and Latino history and major contemporary issues, including immigration, are needed for this century’s jobs and careers.

In addition, with Latin American immigrant communities increasing in number throughout the U.S., there is a broad range of career and volunteer options available. Internationally, options include positions in government and in nongovernmental for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

Students are also encouraged to double-major in another program to increase their opportunities after graduation.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting General Education requirements, all Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies majors must complete the following requirements (37–43 credits):

  • Foreign language proficiency
    This major requires proficiency in Spanish, French, or Portuguese, equivalent to five semesters of the language. Students can fulfill this proficiency in any of the following ways:
    1. through an exemption based on an assessment of proficiency in Spanish, French, or Portuguese by a member of the faculty
    2. through successful completion of a course conducted in Spanish or French at or above the advanced language level
    3. through successful completion of the minor in Spanish or French
  • HIS 1600/Introduction to Latin American Studies: 3 credits
  • Six approved electives in Latin American and Latino studies (18–24 credits)
    Students must take six approved electives that are directly related to Latin America or Latino studies, as outlined below. Up to four credits of an advanced-level language course may be used toward this requirement. Approved courses offered in the target language in which the main focus is on literary, cultural, or historical subject matter are not subject to the four-credit restriction.
    • Two electives chosen from courses in anthropology, environmental studies, political science, and/or sociology
    • Two electives chosen from courses in language and culture, history, and/or literature
    • Two electives chosen from courses in art history and/or cinema studies
    Students should consult with their faculty advisor to determine if a course from another discipline is an appropriate elective.
  • One of the following methods courses: 4 credits
    SOC 3405/Research Methods
    ANT 3560/Fieldwork: Qualitative Methods
    HIS 3880/Junior History Seminar
    Or a designated upper-level course in the humanities or the arts that provides senior project preparation, to be chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor
  • Experiential learning—one of the following: 4 credits
    LST 3050/Experiential Learning in Latin American Studies
    LST 3995/Internship in Latin American Studies
    Or an approved study-abroad program
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Minor requirements:

The minor in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies is designed to provide students with a basic interdisciplinary grounding in the culture, history, and politics of Latin America.

Students interesting in pursuing this minor must submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study. Because new courses may be added to the curriculum from time to time, students should also consult with the Chair of the Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies program.

Recommended: Basic Spanish

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies

Five courses, as follows:

  1. HIS 1600/Introduction to Latin American Studies
  2. Plus four electives in Latin American studies

Elective Courses

Examples of elective courses available for the minor in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies are listed under the academic requirements for the major.


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Sociology
    • BA, Colorado College
    • MA, PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Associate Professor of History
    • BA, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)
    • PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies and History
    Director, School of Film and Media Studies

    PhD, University of Maryland

  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, University of Southern California
  • Associate Professor of Spanish and Literature
    Co-Chair of Language and Culture
    • BA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MFA, New York University
  • Visiting Instructor
    • MA, Auburn University
  • Associate Professor of Language and Culture
    Co-chair of Language and Culture and Coordinator of Linguistics Minor
    • BA, MA, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
    • MA, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
    • MA, PhD, University of Southern California
  • Professor of Sociology
    • BA, MA, MPA, PhD, Syracuse University
  • Associate Professor of Painting and Drawing
    • BA, Princeton University
    • MA, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London
    • MFA, Rhode Island School of Design
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA, Queens College, City University of New York
    • MA, PhD, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor 2022-2023
    • BA, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Contributing Faculty

  • Alex Gordon Curator of Art of the Americas, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • MA, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
    • BA, MA, PhD, University of Montreal

Courses

Courses

 English and Global Literatures

Description:

Students majoring in English and Global Literatures at Purchase College learn to read texts closely and critically and to understand literature in relation to the social and historical conditions in which it is written and read.

Program Highlights

  • The principal focus of the major is British and American literature; the program places these national literatures in an international frame. Thus, students may count toward the major courses in French, Spanish, and other literatures, in translation or in the original language.
  • In addition to courses in traditional literatures, students may take courses in contemporary literature, theatre, popular culture, and film.
  • Feminist inquiry, the critical study of race, and other theoretical or interdisciplinary approaches are central to the literature curriculum.
  • In learning to read, write, and think about literature and the world it reflects, inhabits, and creates, students gain valuable preparation for advanced academic study and for the professional world.

Requirements:

As of Fall 2023, Literature’s title has changed to English and Global Literatures. In addition to meeting General Education requirements, majors must complete a minimum of 10 literature courses, plus an 8-credit senior project, as outlined below.

  • LIT 2450/Colloquium I: Studies in Literature*
    *Generally taken in the second year; transfer students who want to major in literature must complete this course during their first semester at Purchase.
  • Three courses in the literature sequence (courses that emphasize issues of history and period): One each from sequence I (before 1750), II (1750–1900), and III (1900–present)
  • One Comparative Literature course must be taken. This course could be an upper or a lower level course. This course can also fulfill one of the ‘sequence’ course requirements or one of the ‘3 literature electives.’
  • One course in Shakespeare
  • At least three elective literature courses (see notes below)
  • LIT 4450/Colloquium II: Advanced Studies in Literature*
    *Generally taken in the second semester of the junior year
  • LIT 4885/Senior Project Seminar
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II

Of the 10 literature courses:

  • At least five must be at the 3000 or 4000 level (LIT 4450 counts toward this requirement; LIT 4885 does not).
  • At least four must be taken at Purchase College.
  • Students may not use the required Shakespeare course to satisfy the Sequence I requirement. For example, THP 2205 may be taken to fulfill the Sequence I requirement or the Shakespeare course requirement, but not both.
  • Certain courses in language and culture and in theatre and performance (THP prefix) may fulfill the requirements. These courses are cross-referenced in the list of literature courses.
  • Students may count toward the major up to 8 credits of writing courses at the 3000 or 4000 level. Writing courses at the 2000 level may not be counted toward the major requirements.
  • All courses taken to satisfy major requirements, excluding the senior project, must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

Course Sequences for the Major and Minor

Comparative literature courses in the sequences are indicated with an asterisk.

Minor requirements:

The minor in English and Global Literatures is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study literature in a comparative context.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the Department Chair of English and Global Literatures.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in English and Global Literatures

Five courses in English and comparative literature, as follows:

  1. A maximum of two 2000-level courses or
    one 1000-level and one 2000-level course
  2. At least three upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) courses
  3. Of the five courses, two must chosen from two different literature sequences.
  4. Of the five courses, one must be comparative.

Faculty

  • Visiting Instructor
    • MA, Auburn University
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • AB, Harvard University
    • MA, MPhil, PhD, Yale University
  • Associate Professor of Spanish and Literature
    Co-Chair of Language and Culture
    • BA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Literature
    • BA and MA, University of Texas, El Paso
    • PhD, Texas Tech University
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA (Honors), University of Delhi (India)
    • MA, MPhil, PhD, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor of Literature and Writing
    Director, School of Humanities

    BA, MA, PhD, Columbia University

  • Lecturer of Literature
  • Adjunct Assistant Professor, Literature

    PhD, CUNY Graduate Center

  • Professor of Literature
    • BA, Yale University
    • MA, PhD, Rutgers University
    • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching
  • Assistant Professor of Literature
    • BA, SUNY Buffalo
    • MA, University of Rochester
    • PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA, Queens College, City University of New York
    • MA, PhD, Columbia University

Courses