CIN 1500: Introduction to Cinema Studies I

An intensive study of film history with analysis of specific films that represent stages in the evolution of the formal aspects of cinematic expression. Film showings, lectures, seminars.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 1510: Introduction to Cinema Studies II

A continuation of CIN 1500.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 1770: Anatomy of an Indie

An in-depth introduction to the making of independent feature films, from inception through release. This course provides a look at the creative, business, and techniques of filmmaking and how they interact to shape the final product. A basic knowledge of film history and/or arts management is recommended.

Credits: 3

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 2000: Close Analysis

The techniques of filmic expression are examined through a focused, detailed analysis of cinematography, editing, lighting, mise-en-scène, and soundtrack in celebrated cinematic works from around the world. Course content is organized around the establishment or subversion of narrative, generic, and stylistic conventions through the works of one director, a particular genre, or a film movement.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 2200: Music Video and Popular Culture

Examines the history of music videos, studying their effectiveness as a sales mechanisms as well as their influence on how today’s movies, television and commercials are photographed. Students are required to shoot practice exercises throughout the semester, complete a final paper, and shoot a music video on their own for a campus band or musician. Students must have experience operating a video camera and have access to a digital editing platform or be familiar with Final Cut Pro.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 2240: Research Practicum: Silent Cinema

The goals of this course are two-fold. First, the history of silent film through the advent of sound is explored to reveal what early cinema can teach about the present and future of visual culture. Second, students use this exploration into early cinema to improve their film research skills, from data gathering to revision.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 2500: Principles of Montage

An intensive course for cinema studies majors that combines hands-on practice with close analysis. Students explore the art of montage by analyzing the film language of great directors and by shooting and editing short video projects, with an emphasis on the major principles of montage.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 2600: Film Programming

Research and practice in film programming practices and histories. Students research historical and contemporary case studies in film programming and exhibition while engaging in their own on-campus programming. They organize film series and screenings, gaining hands-on experience with and studying diverse perspectives on programming, distribution, curating, fundraising, advertising, engaging in audience outreach, event managing, researching, and writing.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3000: Cinema and Revolution

Third cinema was a movement proposed by Latin American directors in the 1960s and further developed by African directors in the 1970s. It addresses important questions about independent national cinemas, colonialism, race, and identity. This course examines the movement and its global influence, with emphasis on the cinemas of Latin America, Africa, black Britain, and American minorities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3005: Cinema and the Archive

An intensive focus on the intersection between cinema and history. Students examine the debates around cinema’s status as historical document, surveying different approaches to the relationship between cinematic formal traditions and social history. The course emphasizes the analysis of primary sources, such as reviews, posters, magazine and newspaper articles, personal correspondence, trade publications, and blogs.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN2760 And CIN2770 ) Or (CIN1500 And CIN1510 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3030: Documentary Film and Theory

Through a historical survey of documentary and ethnographic film, this course explores documentary theory, aesthetics, and ethics. Topics include early cinema, World War II propaganda, cinema verité, radical documentary, the essay film, counter-ethnographies, and contemporary mixed forms. Films by the Lumières, Flaherty, Marker, Rouch, Minh-ha, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3033: Transnational Filmmaking

Students in this course will write, shoot and edit short documentary and/or fiction films reflecting the culture and country where the films are shot. International student teams work together on locations in USA, Haiti and Africa to produce films which will be screened at cultural events and film festivals.

Credits: 1

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3035: CinéFabrique: Cross-Cultural Encounters in Filmmaking

Working in collaboration with students from film schools in France and Africa, students engage in preproduction via video conference on film projects they will complete together during a subsequent summer study abroad session. Students also examine contemporary cinematic trends in France and Africa, with special focus on diverse geographical settings, cultural and aesthetic histories, and conditions of production and exhibition.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3040: Film Sound: Technique and Theory

An intense focus on sound technology, with careful attention to the way image, dialogue, music, and sound interact in both film and video. The history of sound technology and sound theory are explored by comparing sound innovations in other fields (music, radio, television) to developments in film/video. Films include The Jazz Singer, The Conversation, Pi, and Run Lola Run.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3060: Cult Cinema

An exploration of cult films and the subculture surrounding them. What elements determine the second life of films beyond their initial phase of consumption? Do these films share certain characteristics, or does their cult status depend entirely on viewing practices? How do these subcultures police their boundaries? What reading strategies do these subcultures employ? These questions also allow students to reflect on their attachment to films.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3070: Television Studies

Examines the state of television today, with special attention to new genres, narratives, technologies, audiences, and corporate practices, with special attention to the growth of cable networks, online sites, streaming serials, new modes of spectatorship, and new forms of fan culture.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3075: History of American Television

A survey of the development of broadcasting and electronic media in the United States. It emphasizes the cultural and institutional history of the medium, as well as the aesthetic of televisual genres.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1500 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3080: Mexican Cinema

A survey of the history of Mexican cinema from the early 1930s to the present. Students examine popular genres like la comedia ranchera (Mexican cowboy musical), el género cabaretil (dancehall film), and el cine de luchadores (wrestling film) as well as the work of the most prominent Mexican filmmakers (e.g., Arturo Ripstein, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, Nicolás Echeverría, María Novaro, Guillermo del Toro).

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3090: Cinema of the Portuguese-Speaking World

The films covered offer an opportunity to deeply analyze the formation of national identity, migration, gender and race relations, social inequalities, the rural and urban worlds, and political events that have had an impact on the contemporary societies of Portugal, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, and Angola.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3130: Animation

A survey of animated filmmaking from the inception of cinema to the contemporary era.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3140: Cinema and the City

Explores the role of cinematic representation in shaping the urban imagination. Taking both a historical and a comparative approach, students study the figuration of American, European, and non-Western cities from the silent era to the digital age. Discussions include how cinema has portrayed these metropolitan areas and their people, cultures, and public and private spaces.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3150: Improvisation in Film

An examination of improvisation in scripts, performances, and the directorial design and production process. Students study the techniques of such filmmakers as John Cassavetes and Mike Leigh, the basics of improvisation taught by Viola Spolin and others, and theories of aleatory form; participate in improvisatory scenes; and make a film using improvisational techniques.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510 Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3200: Film, Media, and War Machines

An advanced seminar on theories of cinematic and computational media via “the war machine.” Focus is on the relationship between cinematic and military techniques and technologies—what Virilio dubbed “the deadly harmony” between eye and weapon. Emphasis is also placed on the sociopolitics of code, the ramifications of informatic capture and the formation of coded bodies, and the rise of new machines of war and resistance.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3245: Latin American Cinema

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Students discuss and analyze films in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3255: Media and Migration

As people migrate across the globe, their media forms move with them—sometimes following them, documenting their movement, other times traveling with them, as traces of their home cultures. Focusing on a variety of transnational media forms, this course examines how media producers treat themes of home, nation, belonging, migration, immigration, displacement, alienation, border crossing, and mobile identities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or MSA2200 Or NME2100

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3320: Film Authors

A detailed examination of a filmmaker’s career. Students analyze films in light of a filmmaker’s entire output while situating the artist’s creative process in relation to the industrial and historical context. The course also introduces students to the tradition of auteur criticism.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 Or CIN2760 ) And (CIN1510 Or CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3325: The Screenplay

Designed to foster screenwriting, beginning with creation of the script and working toward completion of a short film by the end of the term. Creative writing and cinema studies students collaborate at all stages of the process, including writing, producing, directing, and editing.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3330: Genres of Affect

In this course, affect is considered as a form of power—the embodied capacity to affect and be affected. Students explore affective genres of visual culture, such as horror, comedy, melodrama, and pornography. The course draws on a range of theoretical perspectives on affect and emotion, emphasizing work from psychoanalysis, philosophy, feminism, and queer theory.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3335: Extremism and Cinema

Engages the difficult topic of political extremism and extreme emotions, as expressed visually and topically in cinema. This is addressed in a historical and cross-cultural fashion to assess the ways in which aesthetics of extremism have emerged in different national contexts at specific historical conjunctures. The course also provides a broad view of the image repertoire of political violence, terrorism, hatred, conspiracy theories, and cynicism as they circulate across media networks

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 Or MSA1500

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3380: Cinema+

Students collaboratively design original, creative, and substantial research projects that shed new light on a film or group of films. Structured as a hands-on, teamwork-based course. Draws on interdisciplinary methods of textual analysis currently being explored by researchers across media studies, arts, literature, and science. Topics include interpretation theory; digital humanities; close, distant, hyper, and machine reading; data visualization; and creative deformance.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3400: Contemporary Global Cinema

A study of contemporary global cinema and recent trends in cinematic style and narrative. The course focuses on non-American/non-European cinemas and co-productions and on important developments in the regional cinemas of Africa and Latin America. The final quarter examines “cinema” from a global perspective, particularly the extent to which new technology and cultural circuits have fostered techniques, styles, and narrative forms.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3410: Contemporary Media Theory

Examines recent debates in media theory, offering critical frameworks to understand the complexities of what a “medium” is, its forms and aesthetics, how it circulates and interacts with subjects and objects, and how it culturally signifies. Critical inquiry is grounded in a range of media texts, from films to reality TV, video games, and artworks.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3420: Contemporary European Cinema

Focuses on the changing landscape of national and regional cinemas of Europe from the 1980s to the present, including the advent of the MTV-influenced cinéma du look movement in France and the neorealist, indie-inspired filmmaking in the Balkan and former Soviet states. The contested (re)definition of what now encompasses ”European cinema” is a defining undercurrent of the course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3480: Methods in Film Criticism

An introduction to the history and modes of film criticism, using the films of Alfred Hitchcock or John Ford (depending on the instructor) as the focal point. The goal is to familiarize students with the diversity of critical approaches in film studies, to make them better critics, and to do so by understanding both the aesthetic qualities and social forces that have made Hitchcock (or Ford) not only one of the great film personae of the 20th century, but also a marketing device, an aesthetic, a genre, and a field of study.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3500: Cinema in the Internet Age

Networked computing has reconfigured cultural production, distribution, textual practices, and consumption. Students investigate how cinema registers these shifts by analyzing films that address the internet and by examining the ways that computing technologies renew film’s significance. Readings cover the latest conversations in media theory, addressing such issues as photographic indexicality, database narratives, digital aesthetics, software studies, and social media.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 Or CIN2660 ) And (CIN1510 Or CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3513: Film, History, and Trauma

Historical trauma has characterized the 20th century. Traumatic events return in unexpected forms, haunting communities and shaping both collective memory and mourning practices. Taking a comparative approach across national cinemas, this course analyzes the historical context, style, and narratives of films that circle around the question of trauma. The course covers German, Israeli, Chilean, Japanese, Russian, and American cinemas.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3515: Eastern European Cinema

Major tendencies in Eastern European cinemas between World War II and the late 1980s are explored. Focusing on Polish, Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, and Yugoslav films, students examine the development of these national cinemas in the sociopolitical context of state socialism, and the flourishing of these cinematic traditions into internationally recognized movements and schools. Major thematic and stylistic preoccupations of Eastern European filmmakers are addressed through a close study of works by Polanski, Wajda, Forman, Jancso, Makavejev, Kusturica, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3533: Race and Representation: U.S. Literature and Film

Racial imagery in the U.S., from the minstrel era to the present, is examined. Students interrogate the mythologies of this imagery as depicted in U.S. literature and film; rethink key analytical categories in cinema and literary studies in light of U.S. race history (genre and spectatorship); and study the racial uses of and meanings behind certain technical innovations in U.S. literature and filmmaking.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3540: Queer Cinema

Emerging queer cinema is explored in its historical contexts and its relation to contemporary theories of gender, sexuality, and their intersection with race, class, and nationality. The course focuses on the “queering of the gaze,” interrogating conventional notions of representation, desire, identification, filmmaking, and spectatorship. Featured directors: Warhol, Fassbinder, Haynes, Von Trotta, Akerman, Rozema, La Bruce, Araki, Denis, Jarman.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3550: Francophone Cinema

An in-depth look at French-language cinema “beyond the hexagon”—that is, film and media originating from regions of the world outside of France, including Africa, the Middle East, the French Caribbean, Belgium, Switzerland, and Québec. The impact of diverse geographical settings, cultural histories, and conditions of production and exhibition are addressed, along with such factors as colonialization, hybridity, diaspora, and globalization.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3600: Kubrick

Stanley Kubrick was one of the most original and cinematic of all film directors. His films were highly original in form, with an innovative use of the medium’s primary elements, including editing, composition, and camera movement. Most were also adaptations of classic and contemporary literature. His ability to transform an author’s literary vision into his cinematic vision was one of the keys to his genius. This course analyzes his films on their own terms and in comparison to their literary sources.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3605: Cronenberg

An exploration of the cinema of David Cronenberg from the beginning of his career to the present.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3650: Siegfried Kracauer: Cinema and the Modern Condition

Focuses on one of the most important and influential of all film commentators, Siegfried Kracauer, whose career extended from Weimar Germany to New York City in the 1960s. The course examines Kracauer’s wide-ranging writings on film history and theory to address key issues in the study of cinema, mass culture, and modern life—issues of continued relevance in today’s digital media environment.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3705: American Film Genres

A detailed examination of the notion of film genre, and consideration of one or more classical Hollywood genres, including the western, musical, melodrama, and film noir.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3715: The Western

In light of a resurgence of the western in film and television, this course spans the history of the genre, from the earliest silent screen versions of dime store novels to its contemporary manifestations. While paying careful attention to the western as myth, epic, and landscape art, the course also explores themes of freedom, justice, and individualism as embedded and transformed in the genre.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3720: Film Noir

Film noir represents the intersection of theme and style that gave American films from 1941 to 1955 a new cynicism, moral ambiguity, and atmosphere of terror. This course attempts to define and explore the concept of film noir by close analysis of films like The Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, Detour, The Big Heat, The Big Combo, Somewhere in the Night, and Kiss Me Deadly.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510 Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3730: The American Avant-Garde Film

Film and theories of the American avant-garde cinema since 1943. The approach is historical, surveying the various periods in the American avant-garde and their relation to contemporary cultural phenomena. Among the artists considered are Harry Smith, George Landow, Jonas Mekas, Ken Jacobs, Ernie Gehr, Stan Brakhage, Maya Deren, Kenneth Anger, Michael Snow, and Hollis Frampton.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3733: Experimental Cinema

Examines the historical, cultural, and production contexts of experimental and avant-garde filmmaking. This course attempts an internationalist breadth of coverage by examining the European historical avant-gardes, the American avant-garde of the pre– and post–World War II periods, the underground and independent film movements of the 1960s, and the function of experimental cinema in shaping personal and communal identities (feminist, queer, and minorities).

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3736: The Independent Spirit in American Film

History of American independent filmmaking from the 1940s to the present. Focuses on a range of directors, including Sam Fuller, Morris Engel, John Cassavetes, and Robert Altman.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3740: From Transformers to Trump

An examination of the political imaginary of 21st century Hollywood film. Drawing on the writings of Siegfried Kracauer, students place contemporary American cinema in a comparative historical framework in order to understand the complex ways that ideological formations (imperialism, authoritarianism, racism, neoliberalism, leftism/progressivism) are encoded within the imagery and narratives of popular film and related media.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3745: Meaning and Truth in Cinema

A survey of the most important developments in film theory. Early theoretical discussions were mostly guided by the need to understand and to legitimize film as a distinct art form and as a new technology of seeing. As a result of the legitimization of film as a cultural fact, film theory became more specialized and a field of its own, alongside art history, literary theory, and philosophy. This course explores how each of these fields has contributed to a deeper understanding of cinema.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3755: Transcendent Visions: The Spiritual on Film

Investigation of a range of filmmakers who attempt to convey the spiritual through manipulation of film form. Films by Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer, Tarkovsky, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3757: New Waves of East Asian Cinema

In this course on internationally acclaimed auteurs of East Asian cinema (Japan, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea), emphasis is placed on the concepts of “national cinema” and “new waves.” In particular, the critique of nationalism via a radicalization of both content and form in the various new waves is examined.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 ) Or (TFI2760 And TFI2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3765: Topics in Classical Cinema

A key element of the classical Hollywood tradition (e.g., classical form, the auteur, the star system, or studio practices) is considered in detail.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3783: American Cinema of the ’50s

American cinema underwent significant upheaval during the 1950s with the crumbling of the studio system, the proliferation of television, fallout from the McCarthy hearings, and the Cold War. This course examines how such directors as Minnelli, Fuller, Welles, Preminger, Sirk, and Ray responded to these extremes, with attention to the historical circumstances and formal innovations that defined the era.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3785: Hawks and Wilder: Hollywood Auteurs

Howard Hawks and Billy Wilder—two of Hollywood’s greatest directors—made sophisticated, brilliantly crafted variations on such genres as the gangster film, comedy, western, musical, and film noir. This course examines the complex issues surrounding authorship in Hollywood film, while considering films to be artworks, social artifacts, and commercial entities shaped by genre expectations and factors beyond the control of any individual creative figure.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3787: The New Hollywood

A study of American mainstream films of the “New Hollywood” or “New American” period of cinema, c. 1965 to the present. Students explore the evolution of American popular cinema in relation to stylistic innovation in international cinema, shifting audience demographics in the domestic market, and industrial and social change in the U.S.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3795: Warhol in Context

Andy Warhol was the most influential visual American artist to emerge during the 1960s, redefining the practice and meaning of fine art and popular culture. Turning his studio, the Factory, into an avant-garde version of a Hollywood soundstage, Warhol created films that are astonishingly rich in pictorial and behavioral nuance. This course examines Warhol’s films and his legacy in film/video art.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3830: Italian Cinema After Neorealism

Survey of Italian cinema of the postneorealist era, with special focus on the films of Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3835: André Bazin, Realism, and Cinema

An advanced seminar focusing on the criticism of André Bazin, a co-founder of the influential magazine Cahiers du Cinéma and prolific author (What is Cinema? Vol. 1 and 2); the cinema that he championed, including Italian neorealism; his influence on post–World War II film studies and criticism; and his current renaissance in contemporary filmmaking and criticism.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3845: New German Cinema

Examination of the rise of New German Cinema in the 1960s and 1970s, with special attention paid to cultural, political, and aesthetic contexts. Directors studied include Alexander Kluge, Volker Schlondorff, Werner Herzog, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and Helma Sanders-Brahms.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3847: Israeli and Palestinian Cinema

An examination of cinema in the Israeli and Palestinian context, from the Lumière brothers’ actualities to contemporary productions by Ari Folman, Amos Gitai, Michel Khleifi, and Elia Suleiman. What role has the medium played in articulating ethnoreligious identity, national ideology, traumatic historical experience, and conflicting territorial claims? How do Middle Eastern films challenge traditional conceptions of cinematic space and time?

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3855: French Cinema

The French refer to filmmaking as the seventh art, i.e., an art form on the level of other fine arts. This course examines French cinema from the silent era to 1970, with special focus on poetic realism and the French New Wave. Films by Vigo, Carné, Renoir, Melville, Truffaut, Godard, Rivette, Rohmer, Resnais, Marker, Varda, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3857: Contemporary French Cinema

The profile of what people think of as “French” cinema has undergone considerable change from the turbulent post-1968 period to the present. This course focuses on major developments in contemporary French cinema from the vantage points of aesthetics, industry, and culture. The role of government subsidies, large European co-productions, and shifts in cultural attention from high-art auteurs (individual authors) to the banlieue (suburb) are studied closely.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3870: Melodrama

Melodrama is both a historical genre and a mode of imagination that operates across media. To bridge these two aspects of melodrama, the course examines its theatrical origins, the film genres that employ its rhetorical devices (the woman’s film, action and disaster films, horror), and its further development in television series and soap operas.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3875: Environmental Media

An examination of how environments are represented across media forms and how they mediate cultural practices. Media forms include landscape painting, nature photography, art installations, music, nature writing, science fiction writing, and eco-cinema. Cultural practices include romantic, philosophical, and aesthetic traditions; indigeneities, nationalism, environmentalism, warfare, eco-mafias; and the arts and sciences of biomedia.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or MSA1050 Or ANT1500

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 3890: Cinema Studies Junior Seminar

A survey of the most important developments in film theory. The goal is to familiarize students with the diversity of critical approaches in film studies and increase understanding of both the aesthetic qualities and social forces at work. Topics include the relationship of film to other forms of media and alternative or counter-hegemonic conceptions of cinema.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 4210: Theory and Praxis: Welles and Resnais

In this advanced seminar comparing the directors Welles and Resnais, their entire oeuvres and their engagement with contemporary theories and philosophies are addressed.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 4220: Science Fiction in Film, Literature, and Art

Science fiction is addressed as an expanded field of inquiry into bodies, machines, science, and technology. The course focuses on narratives about metropolis, colony, utopia, and other technologies of state, self, gender, race, and capital. It also focuses on various figures (e.g., automaton, android, cyborg, avatar, alien) that have populated films from the birth of cinema to the present.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
CIN 4890: Senior Colloquium

Prepares cinema studies majors for the conception and writing of their senior project. The course emphasizes research skills, the formulation of a prospectus and a literature review, the development of a bibliography and a filmography, and the outline of a schedule for completion of the project.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Cinema Studies
FLM 1050: Introduction to Digital Filmmaking

An introduction to the craft of digital filmmaking: cinematography, lighting, staging, sound mixing, and editing. Students work in groups on short exercises to develop their skills and collaborate on a final short film.

Credits: 3

Department: Cinema Studies
FLM 3025: Documentary Filmmaking I

In this introduction to the basics of documentary filmmaking, students learn what it means to construct a visual argument, with attention to process, place, documentary ethics, and good interviewing techniques. Production is complemented by screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM1050 Or CMS1400

Department: Cinema Studies
FLM 3026: Documentary Filmmaking II

In this continuation of Documentary Filmmaking, students design, research, and produce their own documentary film. Screenings, class discussions, and group critique complement the production of the film.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM3025 Or CIN3320

Department: Cinema Studies
FLM 3050: Directing the Scene I

An intensive production-oriented course designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of storytelling in narrative film. The course covers dramatic and stylistic elements of filmmaking. Students direct and edit three short films during the semester, each assignment demonstrating specific principles covered in class.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM1050 Or CMS1400 Or COM1400

Department: Cinema Studies
FLM 3051: Directing the Scene II

Students closely analyze the construction and purpose of a short sequence in the context of the overall story. This course examines the various emotional and intellectual levels layered within a scene that can and do impact the audience. Students write, direct, and edit a short film during the semester.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: CIN1100 Or FLM3050

Department: Cinema Studies
HIS 3145: Chinese Cinema and History

An overview of the development and tradition of Chinese cinema through representative screenings of important films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the historical and political context(s) that informed the creation and reception of these films and learn critical scholarly terminology and historical issues related to the analysis of Chinese film.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
HIS 3345: Classic Hollywood, Early America

Students explore the underlying historical narratives of films from 1930 to 1960 that address topics from early America. These narratives are compared to the ways Hollywood recast historical lessons to suit modern circumstances and to promote “American values” challenged by economic depression and the rise of fascism and communism. Special emphasis is on the works of Ford and Capra.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
LIT 3025: Women and Film

Considers the intersections of sexual difference and cinema. Topics include theories of enunciation and sexual difference, female authorship and the idea of “women’s cinema,” gender and genre, woman as spectacle, the female spectator, and feminist film theory. Representations of sexual difference in films by selected male directors are studied as a means of examining the institution(s) of cinematic expression. The bulk of the course is devoted to studying women directors as they attempt to work within and against that institution.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
LIT 3680: Surrealism and Its Legacy

Surrealist literature, films, and art in France, Spain, and Latin America. Artists include Aragon, Breton, Buñuel, Césaire, Char, Dali, Eluard, and Lorca. Works are read in translation and lectures given in English; students with French and/or Spanish are encouraged to read in the original language.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
NME 3010: Cross-Cultural Video Production

Students collaborate with students in other cultures, using the Internet to produce videos on subjects of mutual interest. Because the focus is on developing a cross-cultural dialogue, basic video production experience is expected. Before moving to video, the two groups collaboratively write fiction. During the semester, they meet in video conferences with their peers abroad to discuss their productions. Previous semesters have included collaborations with students at universities in Belarus, Turkey, Mexico, Germany, and Lithuania.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
PHI 2835: Happiness: Philosophy, Film, Literature

An interdisciplinary examination of the subject of happiness, using a variety of ancient and modern literary and philosophical works as well as films. Students analyze the texts and films for their specific content but also for a deepened sense of the possible relationships between visual and discursive representations of narratives.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
PHI 3275: Light and Truth: Film, Photography, and Reality

Do photographic images have privileged access to truth? This course explores the complicated relationship between truth and visual (particularly filmic) images. It begins with Plato on the “fakery” that is painting, turns to 17th-century “faithfulness” and “sincerity” in still-life painting and scientific drawing, and looks in depth at 20th-century writings about the nature of photography and realism in representation.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies
PHI 3716: Philosophy and Film

A critical examination of influential attempts to understand the nature of the cinematic medium. Questions raised include: Is film a fine art? Must a movie “represent reality” if it is to succeed as a movie? Are there certain insights into human experience that are better expressed through film than through other media? Readings include Siegfried Kracauer, André Bazin, and Stanley Cavell.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or PHI1515 Or PHI2110 Or PHI3212

Department: Cinema Studies
SPA 3211: Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Spain and Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Films are discussed and analyzed in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies