ANT 2320: Performing Arts in Cross-Cultural Perspective

An introductory survey of music, theatre, and dance in Western and non-Western cultures, including the relationships between music and religion, dance and weddings, theatre and curing. The course also explores the performing arts as aesthetic phenomena in their own right. Live performances by non-Western performers and optional field trips are planned.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: ANT1500 Or MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: New Media
ARH 3531: New Media and Contemporary Art

An examination of contemporary art outside of the traditional media of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Looking at painting-based performances of the 1950s, feminist body art, guerrilla television, and current political interventions based in digital media, students identify the strategies artists used to create new forms, and assess their success in modifying our understanding of the world.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: New Media
CIN 3200: Film, Media, and War Machines

An advanced seminar on theories of cinematic and computational media via “the war machine.” Focus is on the relationship between cinematic and military techniques and technologies—what Virilio dubbed “the deadly harmony” between eye and weapon. Emphasis is also placed on the sociopolitics of code, the ramifications of informatic capture and the formation of coded bodies, and the rise of new machines of war and resistance.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
DES 3090: Interactive and Experience Design

A focused inquiry into the process of designing for, and the creation of, interactive platforms for the purposes of entertainment, persuasion, recreation, and/or human enrichment where the viewer is an active participant. This course is an intensive investigation into considerations surrounding interactive, or experience-oriented, design spaces, and samples supplemental readings from sociology, anthropology, and game theory. You will be required to work collaboratively to pursue concepts through a series of physical and digital investigations.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (DES2460 And DES3510 ) And DES3200

Department: New Media
DES 3190: Motion Graphics for Designers

Builds on the principles and skills of time-based and interactive design introduced in DES 2460. Technique, theory, and practice are further explored through projects using time, on-screen spatiality, transition, kinetic typography, narrative, and sound. Projects address linear and nonlinear environments such as film and television titling, DVD menus, web splash pages, and graphics for mobile devices.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: DES2460 Or VDE2460

Department: New Media
DES 3265: Social Design

A combined lecture/studio course that examines ethical and social issues in contemporary artistic production and design. The goal is to develop active research about such urgent issues as ecology, body politics and gender, race and urban justice, and human rights, with respect to new futures. Projects incorporate art installations, visualizations, websites, performances, and public campaigns by focusing on creative public engagement.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME2100 Or (DES2600 And DES2460 )

Department: New Media
MAT 1420: Programming Games

An introduction to traditional and modern concepts in programming. Traditional concepts covered include variables, expressions, data representation, logic, arrays, functions, and pseudo-random numbers. The modern concepts include graphical constructs and event-driven programming. This course uses familiar games as projects, because implementing games requires an understanding of important programming concepts and attention to the human-computer interface.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
MAT 1520: Computer Science I

An introduction to problem solving, using computers. Emphasis is on programming, including the study of syntax, semantics, logical structures, graphics, and object-oriented programming. General topics of algorithm development, formulating problems, finding methods for computer solutions, differences among computer languages, and trends in the industry are also discussed. Experience is acquired through hands-on labs and several programming assignments.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
MAT 3146: Scripting for the Web

Building on the programming introduction in the prerequisite course, students learn about scripting for websites, including HTML, JavaScript, CSS, and php. Topics include the use of cookies, localStorage, video/audio, geolocation, an application program interface such as the Google Maps API, responsive design, and accessibility. Comparisons are made between scripting and compiled languages and client versus server computing.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAT1520 Or NME1450

Department: New Media
MAT 3440: Creating User Interfaces

Introduces concepts and skills used in analyzing and designing interfaces for computer applications. As students study techniques and “rules of thumb,” they discover that the design and implementation of each interface is a unique challenge, which requires creativity and consideration of technical, aesthetic, and psychological factors. Includes the use of XML, XSL, XHTML-MP, VoiceXML, and usability studies.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAT1420 Or MAT1520 Or NME1420 Or NME1520

Department: New Media
MAT 3650: Networking and Security

Covers the key conceptual and practical aspects of networking and security, which are increasingly important in the era of the internet, Windows, and Unix. TCP/IP communications protocols are explored at multiple levels of the protocol stack. Performance and reliability issues are also studied, using campus intranet and internet connections as well as protocol analyzer and network management tools. Security topics include encryption, authentication, and the likely change from clear-text to Kereberos-type tools.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAT1520 Or NME1520

Department: New Media
MSA 1050: Introduction to Media Studies

An introduction to theories of the media, visual, and performing arts. Using semiotics as a point of departure, students explore the language and iconography of visual communication. The course focuses on works of art, advertising, television, and the web as social contexts of cultural production and analyses the role that ordinary people play in the production of media.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media
MSA 2235: Computers and Culture

Examines the connections between computers and culture, with a critical look at how computers may be changing and shaping culture, and how culture affects people’s use and understanding of computers. The course focuses in particular on the ways in which gender, race, and class affect people’s experiences with and understanding of computers. Both work and leisure uses of computers are considered.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: New Media
MSA 3160: Queer Media Convergence

Media convergence refers to large-scale changes in the ownership and production of media content, as well as the role that audiences and consumers have in its development. This course examines media convergence from the perspectives of queer theory and history, and asks how queer identities, sensibilities, styles, and practices both shape and are shaped by media convergence.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 1060: Introduction to Sound

A hands-on, introductory audio class in which students learn how to use sound in practical and creative ways, in three phases of production: acquisition, manipulation, and reproduction. Students also learn some of the history of artists and makers who use sound as their medium, as well of some of the technical and theoretical aspects of how sound is created and perceived.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media
NME 1160: Design Principles

A hands-on introduction to the language of design and design principles with emphasis on composition, color, and type. Software for vector image creation is taught alongside understanding the full design process, from visual research to beta testing. Print output is introduced, although the focus is on screen-based media.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 1450: Programming for Visual Artists

Using a visual environment that provides immediate feedback, students are taught the basic principles of programming and, by extension, math. Lectures focus on key aspects of programming and how working artists use code creatively in their practice. In this course, math is never the end but rather the means to problem-solve during the creative process.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 2100: New Media Advanced Standing

Students take this course in the semester that they apply for Advance Standing. Grading is on a pass/no credit basis. Advanced Standing is a portfolio review that asks students to present work from the broad range of foundation classes they have taken. After applying for and receiving Advanced Standing, New Media majors pursue a program of upper-level study in which they may pursue a broad range of individual interests.

Credits: 1

Department: New Media
NME 2250: Art and Technology

Examines the interplay between new art forms and technologies from early modernism through today. Focusing on how the two fields have developed in relation to each other, the course addresses two questions: what is the relationship between technology, technique, and art, and how has it changed over time? This is both an art survey course and a study of related philosophical questions.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: New Media
NME 2420: Video Art I

An introduction to video as a creative visual, auditory, and spatial medium. Students learn the fundamentals of video production with the goal of making original work in the genres of single-channel tape, performance, and installation. At the same time, students are introduced to key works in the history of time-based arts in a weekly thematic program of viewing, listening, reading, and critique.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1010 Or NME1100 Or NME1060 Or VIS1330

Department: New Media
NME 2470: Drawing, Moving, and Seeing with Code

An intermediate lecture/studio course that explores techniques for creating dynamic, poetic, and lifelike animations in code. Students learn techniques to program movement and the simulation of natural systems and behaviors, and develop works that respond to various inputs. Projects are developed using open-source software environments like Processing and p5.js.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: VIS1450 Or MAT1520 Or NME1450 Or NME1520 Or MAT1420 Or NME1420

Department: New Media
NME 2550: Media, Memory, and Desire

An exploration of the ways in which various media technologies promote investment and disinvestment in history, community, and tradition. This course pursues the argument that technology does not derive from, but creates the fundamental structures of human experience, affecting people socially, politically, psychologically, and neurologically. Primary authors include Plato, Kant, Marx, Freud, Heidegger, Derrida, Stiegler, and Malabou.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: New Media
NME 2750: Introduction to the Web

Students gain a solid understanding of website creation, using HTML and Cascading Style Sheets. Scripting languages and libraries are also introduced to create more advanced interactions or animations. Along with technical skills, students learn web design fundamentals and how artists have used and even served as authors of the web since its inception.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1160

Department: New Media
NME 3010: Cross-Cultural Video Production

Students collaborate with students in other cultures, using the Internet to produce videos on subjects of mutual interest. Because the focus is on developing a cross-cultural dialogue, basic video production experience is expected. Before moving to video, the two groups collaboratively write fiction. During the semester, they meet in video conferences with their peers abroad to discuss their productions. Previous semesters have included collaborations with students at universities in Belarus, Turkey, Mexico, Germany, and Lithuania.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 3040: Internet as Public Art

A growing dialogue surrounding internet art echoes the rhetoric of community-oriented art practices and public art movements of the past. Topics include an introduction to the history of public art; current internet art practice and theory; how networks can serve physical situations or communities, rather than being a purely screen-based phenomenon; policies that are shaping the functionality of the internet; and new artistic possibilities that arise as ubiquitous computing integrates with public space.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 3050: Information Aesthetics

A hands-on examination of what it means to live in an information age. Students learn to make sense—and sometimes, new meaning—of data through creative visualizations. The course considers audience together with the politics of information and the persuasion of the visual.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1160

Department: New Media
NME 3150: Material Distribution: Billboards, Wheatpaste, and Pamphlets

Examines how contemporary artists and activists are using print media to communicate ideas in public spaces. The course also more generally considers how printed matter has been used to expand popular consciousness since the invention of the printing press. Students produce their own print interventions for public spaces and incorporate digital media to sustain interaction.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3170: Digital Design and Fabrication

Focuses on the relationship between digitally aided production processes and traditional techniques of drawing and object building. Emphasis is placed on the fabrication of objects and prints in multiples that interact with physical space and the body. Students are also encouraged to develop their own drawing tools and initiate ideas around making with new media technologies.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3210: Tactical Practical

The first rule of guerrilla warfare is to know the terrain. Today’s terrain is one of symbols, media spectacles, and technology that artists are uniquely equipped to navigate. In this course, students learn to combine sociological research, communications strategy, technological methods, and artistic tactics to plan effective social interventions. Students should bring their passion, thoughtfulness, compassion, and planning skills.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3215: New Directions in Virtual Space

Focuses on establishing a broad understanding of the 3-D game engine Unity and a critical understanding of the discourse surrounding modern virtual environments. Students are encouraged to deviate from traditional 3-D games, bringing content and forms of storytelling from other areas of interest. Artists and texts that examine our cultural fascination with the virtual are presented in class. Students are introduced to Unity and to the programming language C#, but some prior programming experience is expected.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1450 Or MAT1520

Department: New Media
NME 3220: Forms of the Moving Image

Students explore the various ways that artists distribute and present video and the moving image. Examining issues of audience, the physical experience, and the social aspects of media distribution, this course focuses on the life of video after it is rendered. Topics include video installation, the moving image online, live video performance, and video remixes and re-edits.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3230: Real-Time Media Processing

Using Pure Data, an open-source, graphical programming environment, students experiment with real-time media processing while exploring conceptual concerns and implications through historical and theoretical readings. Students are encouraged to explore personal experiments integrating these conceptual ideas into projects that may include algorithmic or interactive audio performances, screen-based visuals, or interaction with physical devices.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3275: Special Topics in New Media

Focusing on specialized topics in new media, students work closely with faculty to explore new areas of their practice and research. Students develop projects in particular area of specialization. The curriculum will vary in relation to the faculty member’s practice and research.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 3340: Photography Expanded

What does it mean to be a photographer in the age of ubiquitous imaging technologies (e.g., cellphones, surveillance cameras, satellites, and drones), social media, and online image databases? Students explore questions related to the status of photography, consider interdisciplinary approaches using emerging technologies (including online platforms, laser cutters, and drones), and work collaboratively in a studio-based environment.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: PHO1100 Or NME1010

Department: New Media
NME 3350: Digital Printmaking

An introduction to fine art digital printing and contemporary digital photography. Students expand their two-dimensional image-making skills while developing their artistic vision through the creation of a cohesive body of print-based work. Topics concerning the importance of contemporary photography are discussed in class through lectures and presentations. Students are expected to combine contemporary ideas with the rigor of printing quality images.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3420: Video Art II

An advanced workshop for highly motivated students who have expressed interest and fluency in time-based video work. The class is devoted to the production of various independent video projects, culminating in a thesis project; in addition, students do multiple presentations focusing on situating their work within historical and contemporary contexts. A wide variety of time-based artworks are explored, including single-channel, multi-channel, and video installation work. Students are expected to have competency with digital video cameras, sound, and editing techniques.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (SCP2420 Or VSC2420 ) Or NME2420 And NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3430: Video Graphics

An exploration of the ways that graphic techniques can be used by video artists, animators, and designers in their work. Through lectures and presentations, students are exposed to the work of artists who use a variety of approaches, from abstract animation to kinetic text and transformation of live-action video. Students learn about key framing, matting, compositing, working in 3-D spaces, and other computer-based video processes. A special emphasis is placed on issues in contemporary video art, and the ways in which video graphics are used to explore these ideas.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3435: Video Performance

Students expand their video production skills while increasing their knowledge of the history and theory of video and performance art. In solo and collaborative assignments, students create projects that grow out of class discussions. Topics include relationships between live, remote, virtual, public, and private performance; action and document; sets and sculptural objects; autobiography and use of the body; and politics of the camera. Contemporary video performance is situated in the context of the history of photographic media as well as contemporary new-media tools and practices.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2420

Department: New Media
NME 3455: Dark Ecology Studio

People are entangled in a dark ecology, in which humans, marshes, car parks, and foreign rubber plantations are all intimately connected. Students explore methods of investigation drawn from both scientific and artistic modes of inquiry, such as mapping, poetic and scientific sensing, visualization, and photography. How can public interventions shift how individuals perceive and represent their deep connections to environmental systems?

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1450 Or MAT1520

Department: New Media
NME 3545: Community-Centered Media

Student groups are paired with local organizations with which they work throughout the semester. After site visits, interviews, and research, students identify a specific problem or need that they can address through media art production. Students learn about the inner workings and critical impact of participating organizations while helping to envision and implement change through creative thinking and technical know-how.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 3560: Introduction to Physical Computing: Getting Outside the Box

Students break down the physical barrier of the personal computer and bring computing into the “real” world. The main tool used for this purpose is the Arduino, an open-source micro-controller popular with artists and makers. Students are introduced to theories of game design (both historical and modern) and apply them to their class projects; the course also explores the societal implications of building and programming and repurposing personal electronics, and examines artists and makers who have used physical computing for creative expression.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (NME1420 Or MAT1420 ) Or (NME1520 Or MAT1520 )

Department: New Media
NME 3675: Copy, Paste

The ease with which digital tools allow people to copy, paste, and recombine creative work challenges long-held ideas about originality and creativity. In this combined studio/lecture course, students examine the theory and history of appropriation, sampling, quotation, and reuse in the arts, while simultaneously creating their own multidisciplinary works that engage with contemporary ideas related to these issues.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 3720: Interactive Installation: Hacking the Everyday

Considers how artists have traditionally managed interactive spaces and how new technologies expand and shift the meaning of interactivity in contemporary art. “Circuit bending,” an approach to electronics that repurposes older machines and toys, is also introduced. Students create their own interactive artworks; emphasis is on nontraditional uses of materials. Arduino microcontrollers and the Processing open-source platform are demonstrated in class and available to students.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 3770: Experimental Web Practice

The internet is examined as a tool for artistic expression and action. Students consider what is unique about the internet; exploit its potential as a means for communication, distribution, simulation, and interaction; and experiment with web production. A wide range of internet art projects are studied to stimulate ideas and give students an understanding of what is happening in the “net art” world. Students are expected to challenge standard notions of how the web functions.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2730 Or MAT3730

Department: New Media
NME 3780: Games for Change

A hands-on examination of how digital games can go beyond pure entertainment and be used as a means for educating people about important social and global issues. Students work on Web-based Flash games, social networking games, or mobile games that are conceptualized, designed, and developed to effect change.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
NME 3880: Junior Seminar in New Media

Students develop a definition of new media through a range of learning experiences. These include a survey of work in the field, with guest artists and class trips to galleries, media production houses, and events; students’ critical writing and interactive discussions about what they are experiencing; and teacher-structured and student-initiated collaborative projects in which students test different creative roles, using various media.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media
NME 4150: Special Projects in Tiny Computing

Students create custom projects using inexpensive, bank card–sized computers for art installations and works for the public good. In the process, their knowledge of text-based interfaces, free culture, collaboration, circuit building, and the history of creative computing/hacking is deepened.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1450 Or MAT1420 Or MAT1520

Department: New Media
NME 4880: Senior Seminar I in New Media

Students meet weekly to discuss some of the seminal texts in new media and to make presentations on their senior project proposals. By the end of the semester, each student has a website describing his or her project and a working timeline.

Credits: 2

Department: New Media
NME 4890: Senior Seminar II in New Media

Students meet weekly to develop their senior projects further, design the new media exhibition, and practice writing proposals to external organizations and preparing their résumés.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: NME4880

Department: New Media
PHO 3355: Landscape Photography: Creating a Personal Vision

Students explore the effect of landscapes and surroundings in Pisciotta, Italy, and develop their personal vision by observing and leveraging those landscapes and translating their experiences into powerful images. Working with digital cameras (a simple one is fine), students create a personal photographic essay, depicting what they see through the lens of their surroundings.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
SCP 3310: Digital Dimensions

In this digital fabrication course, students explore the relationship between the three-dimensional world and digital technology. In this creative new-media environment, students are given a foundation for developing 3-D content and integrating it into their preferred field. Students generate digital objects, prepare them for real-world fabrication, and create virtual-reality simulations and photorealistic sculpture proposals. This course will utilize laser-cutters, CNC router and 3D printers.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: VIS1260 Or NME2100

Department: New Media
SCP 3630: Sound/Interactive Media I

Sound is explored as material in the context of the visual arts, using DAT recorders, sampling, synthesis, processing, computers, sensor control, and MIDI systems. Projects may include making sonic instruments, sounding objects, and experimental video; ambient, interactive, performative, and multimedia installations; and surround-sound DVDs. Advanced technological means enable uncharted explorations in the time-based arts.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media
SCP 3640: Sound/Interactive Media II

A continuation of SCP 3630, for advanced sound and multimedia projects. Sound is further explored in ambient, interactive, performative, time-based, and site-specific installations. Tools available include the Kurzwell K2600 Architectural Synthesis System and Macintosh computers with mixing, synthesis, and DVD surround-sound mastering technology. Interactive programs in the studio include MAX, Jitter, and Cyclops.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (SCP3630 Or VSC3630 ) Or NME3630

Department: New Media
THP 3120: Gameplay and Performance

Explores the genre of alternate reality or pervasive gaming currently used as an alternative to traditional performance by contemporary theatrical and visual artists, dancers, and musicians. The blurring distinctions between game and narrative are examined, opening new possibilities for performance. Students design and stage their own live alternate-reality game as a means of storytelling or extend an existing narrative through transmedia.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media
VIS 3000: Art in the Age of Electronic Media

An overview of electronic media and its relationship to the fine arts. This course covers the genre from its infancy to the present and focuses on the study of the art and artists critical to the genre’s development. Lectures, hands-on demonstrations, and visiting artists are augmented by assigned readings, critical writing, and examinations.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media