Policies

Admission of Persons with Prior Felony Convictions

Effective beginning in the spring 2018 semester, no SUNY campuses may include a questions regarding criminal history on admissions applications. However, admitted students who are seeking campus housing; clinical, field experiences, or internships; and study abroad programs will be asked if they have been convicted of a felony as part of the application process for those programs/services.

State University of New York (SUNY) policy prohibits Purchase College admission applications from inquiring into an applicant’s prior criminal history. After acceptance, the college shall inquire if the student previously has been convicted of a felony if such individual seeks campus housing or participation in clinical or field experiences, internships or study abroad programs. The information required to be disclosed under SUNY policy regarding such felony convictions shall be reviewed by a standing campus committee consistent with the legal standards articulated in New York State Corrections Law. Students who have previously been convicted of a felony are advised that their prior criminal history may impede their ability to complete the requirements of certain academic programs and/or to meet licensure requirements for certain professions. Students who have concerns about such matters are advised to contact the dean’s office of their intended academic program.

Students who indicate that they have been convicted of felonies will be reviewed by a standing review committee chaired by the associate dean for student affairs.  The associate dean has been designated as the campus liaison with parole, probation, and correctional alternatives offices.

The student must provide the following to the committee chair for the review process:

  • A copy of the unsuppressed criminal history record from the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services, or the equivalent document for jurisdictions outside of New York State
  • If currently on parole or probation status, references from the NYS Department of Correctional Services Division of Parole or the Office of Probation and Correctional Alternatives
  • A personal interview with the campus committee, if the committee deems it necessary
  • It is incumbent on the student to provide all information in a timely manner, as failure to do some may delay or preclude participation in the requested activity/program

 The campus committee will:

  • Review the submitted information
  • Conduct a personal interview if deemed necessary
  • Evaluate all information
  • Make a determination regarding whether the participation in the activity will be granted or denied
  • If granted, make a determination of any conditions required for the participation
  • Notify the student and the impacted office in writing of the committees determination
  • The determination of the committee is final. However, students may submit a new request if circumstances change.
Alcohol or Drug Use/Possession Disclosure Policy

Disclosure of Alcohol or Drug Violations of Student Under 21

Pursuant to the Warner Amendment to the Higher Education Reauthorization Act of 1998 [Section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C 1232g)],  institutions of higher education may disclose, “to a parent or legal guardian of a student, information regarding any violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the institution, governing the use of possession of alcohol or a controlled substance, regardless of whether that information is contained in the student’s education records, if (A) the student is under the age of 21; and (B) the institution determines that the student had committed a disciplinary violation with respect to such use or possession.” 

The types of cases in which parents or legal guardians of students who are under the age of 21 may be informed about a drug or alcohol related incident:

  1. Any case where a student is separated from the College for reasons related to alcohol or controlled substance. A separation from the College, for the purposes of this policy, shall include an interim suspension, expulsion, or involuntary medical leave. 
  2. Any case where a student is transported from the College by ambulance for reasons related to alcohol or controlled substances. 
  3. Any case where a student is found responsible for any charge related to alcohol, marijuana, or a controlled substance.

NOTE:  Please see the Purchase College Parental Notification Policy for additional parental notification information.

Alcohol Policy

 

1. Preamble
The college’s policies and procedures governing the use of alcohol at events which are under the supervision of the college, whether these occur on or off the campus, reflect the following considerations: 

A. Recent changes in societal attitudes regarding the use and abuse of alcohol, coupled with the general concern for its impact on the public’s health and well-being, have been mirrored in changes in local and state laws.

B. An increasingly litigious society makes all individuals and organizations who serve alcohol and those who sponsor events at which alcohol is provided, regardless of the public or private nature of the event, vulnerable to great liability. 

C. Confusing messages are sent frequently about the role of alcohol in contemporary society; a formal educational program which promotes the responsible use of alcohol is important so that members of the college community are better able to make informed choices about their behavior. 

D. The college—as a public agency—expects adherence to the laws of the State of New York and/or other jurisdictions in which a college-sponsored events occurs. No special exemption from civil or criminal law exists for members of college community.

The college recognizes that the abuse of alcohol is a very serious problem which is detrimental to the individual student, to the educational process, and to the learning environment. Accordingly, the college provides confidential counseling and help for those who have problems with alcohol abuse through the Counseling Center and Health Services. Purchase College is committed to fostering an environment that will offer alternative academic and social settings to mitigate against alcohol abuse, e.g., maintaining facilities open to students for socializing after hours; library, studio, and/or study settings that encourage student scholarship; and appropriate social/academic programming that will engage student interest and participation, particularly on weekends.

II. Legal Background
College policy governing the use and abuse of alcohol beverages reflects three New York State Laws and two ordinances of Town of Harrison, each of which is summarized here:

A.Alcoholic Beverage Control Law, Section 65 (Prohibited Sales):
No person shall sell, deliver, or give away or cause or permit or procure to be sold, delivered, or given away any alcoholic beverages to:

  1. Any person actually or apparently under the age of 21 years
  2. Any visibly intoxicated person
  3. Any habitual drunkard known to be such to the person authorized to dispense any alcoholic beverages

B.Alcoholic Beverage Control Law Section 65 – C (1 and 2) (Unlawful Possession): Except as hereinafter provided no person under the age of 21 years shall possess any alcoholic beverage, as defined in this chapter, with the intent to consume such beverage. A person under the age of 21 years may possess any alcoholic beverage with intent to consume if the alcoholic beverage is given:

a. to a person who is a student in a curriculum licensed or registered by the state education department and the student is required to taste or imbibe alcoholic beverages in courses which are part of the required curriculum. 

b. to the person under 21 years of age by that person’s parent or guardian.

C. Alcoholic Beverage Control Law, Section 65 – B (2)(a) (Fraudulent Identification): No person under the age of 21 years shall present or offer to any license under this chapter, or to the agent or employee of such license, any written evidence of age which is false, fraudulent,or not actually his own for the purpose of purchasing or attempting to purchase any alcoholic beverage.

D. Alcoholic Beverage Control Law, Section 65 – B (3) (Fraudulent Use of Driver’s License): In addition to the penalties otherwise provided in subdivision one of this section, if a determination is made sustaining a charge of illegally purchasing or attempting to illegally purchase an alcoholic beverage, the court may suspend such person’s license to drive a motor vehicle for 90 days if it is found that it was the written evidence of age used for the purpose of such illegal purchase or attempt to illegally purchase.  

E. General Obligations Law: Article 11-100 (Known as the Social Host Law): Any person who shall be injured in person, property, means of support or otherwise, by reason of the intoxication or impairment of ability of any person under the age of 21 years, whether resulting in his death or not, shall have a right of action to recover actual damages against any person who knowingly causes such intoxication or impairment of ability by unlawfully furnishing to or unlawfully assisting in procuring alcoholic beverages for such person with knowledge or reasonable cause to believe that such person was under the age of 21 years. 

F. General Obligations Law: Article 11-101 (Known as the Dram Shop Act): Any person who shall be injured in person, property, means of support or otherwise by any intoxicated person, or by reason of the intoxication of any person, whether resulting in his death or not shall have a right of action against any person who shall, by unlawful selling to or unlawfully assisting in procuring liquor for such intoxicated person have caused or contributed to such intoxication; and in any such action such person shall have a right to recover actual and exemplary damages.   

G. Open Containers Prohibited: Town of Harrison LL#21 978 85 – 4: No person shall consume or ingest alcoholic beverage in any public place or transportation facility within the Town of Harrison. Carrying on the person, holding or possessing any open, unsealed, or partially full bottle, can, or container which contains an alcoholic beverage in a public place as herein above defined shall constitute prima facie evidence a violation of this section. 

H. Open Containers in Vehicles: Town of Harrison LL#21 978 85 – 5: Any open, unsealed, resealed, or partially full bottle, can or container which contains an alcoholic beverage found in any vehicle in any such public place or transportation facility shall be prima facie evidence that the same is in possession of all the occupants of said vehicle and in possession of the person last having control and custody of said vehicle. 

III. The Policy
The use of alcoholic beverages by those of legal age is permitted on college property and at college-sponsored events in accordance with applicable State Laws and college policies as stated herein. Responsibility for ensuring compliance with these laws and policies rest with each member of the college community, whether student, faculty, or staff. 

In compliance with State law and Town ordinance, open containers of alcoholic beverages are permitted in public spaces on campus only at registered events or contract vendor operations. “Public spaces” include hallways, stairwells, lounges, and instructional areas of all buildings. 

In support of the responsible use of alcohol, kegs are not permitted on campus except as provided by a contract vendor at registered public events and in food service operations as provided in this policy.

When alcohol is used illegally or when inappropriate behavior accompanies and/or follows the use to alcoholic beverages (e.g., behavior which violates the rights of others in the community or causes personal injury and/or property damage), these actions become a legitimate concern of the college community. Such behavior shall be considered a serious offense and may result in disciplinary, administrative, criminal, or civil action. Campus disciplinary action will be taken through the judicial process and consequences may range from verbal warnings to the most severe disciplinary penalty.

The college provides confidential counseling, educational programs, and other services for those students seeking assistance for problems related to alcohol.

This policy shall be reviewed on an annual basis by the Alcohol and Drug Policy Review Committee who will make recommendations for changes and updates in the policy to the college governance structure.

IV. Policies for personal use and possession in private facilities

A. The college permits personal use and possession of alcoholic beverages by those of legal age in small, informal gatherings in private facilities as provided in this policy. Personal use and possession of alcoholic beverages as defined in this section do not have to be registered. 

B. Residence Facilities (Residence Halls & Apartments): In private living units (rooms, suites, or apartments) where none of the assigned residents are 21 years old or older, alcoholic beverages may not be present.

C. Residence Facilities (Residence Halls & Apartments): In private living units (rooms, suites, or apartments) where one or more of the assigned residents are 21 years old or older, alcoholic beverages may be consumed by residents and their guests who are 21 years old or older under the following guidelines:

  1. Private living units are defined as: Rooms, suites, apartment spaces that are not generally accessible to the general public, where a student may have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Alcoholic beverages may not be consumed outside at any time, including in the apartment complexes. 
  2. Under the “Personal Use” category, the maximum number in attendance may not exceed the limits set below:
    ·For units designed to accommodate one to two people: 6 people
    ·For units designed to accommodate four people (apartments/suites): 10 people
    ·For units designed to accommodate six to eight people (apartments/suites): 14 people
  3. The host(s) will prevent disruptive and excessive noise, which may be disturbing to area residents, and be accountable for the behavior of his or her guests.

D. Other Campus Facilities: Students, faculty, or staff members who are 21 years of age or older may consume alcoholic beverages within their office, personal studio, or similar private space in groups of 10 or fewer individuals if permitted under guidelines established by their supervisor and the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building.

V. General Policies for Other than Personal Use

A. Direct or indirect charges for alcoholic beverages may be levied only if provided by a contract vendor with the appropriate license liability insurance coverage. That vendor must operate in compliance with State law and college policies, and will be held accountable for ensuring that enforcement takes place.

B. For both small, private gatherings and large, public open events, everyone wishing to obtain alcoholic beverages, whether sold or given away, must present picture identification as proof of age. This is generally a driver’s license or sheriff’s ID. Any question about the legitimacy of such proof with result in denial of service.

C. A reasonable amount of non-alcoholic beverages (other than water) and food must be provided at any event where alcoholic beverages are served. There must be a sufficient quantity and variety of nonalcoholic beverages available at all times during the function to meet the legitimate needs of nondrinkers.

D. Under no circumstance may individual be permitted to bring their own alcoholic beverages to an event where alcohol is being served under the provisions of this policy, nor to a nonalcoholic event.

E. Alcoholic beverages may only be served within the hours indicated at the location stated on the registration form, and cannot be removed from that location. Services of alcoholic beverages may not exceed midnight at functions scheduled on Sunday through Thursday and may not exceed 1:30 a.m. for function scheduled Friday and Saturday. 

F. All other than personal use of alcoholic beverages, such as small private gatherings or larger, open, public events, must be registered with the appropriate dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building (residence coordinators for residence units as stated in sections VI and VII of this policy).

VI.  Special policies for small, private gatherings
A small private gathering is defined to include any social event or function larger than that defined as “Personal Use” above but is less than the maximum attendance limitations described below. Small private gatherings are events that are closed to the general public (are not advertised) and generally who will attend is known in advance. For example, the party host(s) should be able to draw up a guest list or invitation list in advance containing the names of those who will be attending.

Small, private gatherings must be registered with the appropriate dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building (residence coordinators for residence units).

A. Residence Facilities (Residence Halls & Apartments): Small-group social events are an important part of life in a college residential setting. Periodically, residents may choose to include alcoholic beverages as part of their refreshments.

  1. In the small, private gathering category, the maximum number in attendance may not exceed the limits set below:
    ·For units designed to accommodate one to two people: 8 people
    ·For units designed to accommodate four people (apartments or suites): 16 people
    ·For units designed to accommodate between six and eight people (apartments or suites): 24 people

    Suites, rooms, and apartments are not designed for larger events which should take place in specific lounges and group programming spaces that have been made available in other facilities for this purpose.
  2. The college holds resident host(s) responsible for the use of alcohol and the actions of their guests; residents and their guests are expected to comply with the laws and policies governing alcohol  and will be held accountable for such. 
  3. Small, private gatherings in residence facilities are only allowed in the apartment complexes.  They must be registered with the Apartments Complex Office by no later than the Tuesday prior to the event. Residence Life will forward notice to the New York Stat University Police. Registration forms are available from the Apartments Complex Office during normal business hours Monday through Friday.

    a. The registration will be approved by the residence coordinator if:

    i. The host(s) have made plans for enforcing and indicate an intent to adhere to all campus policies and state and local laws governing the sale, services, provision, possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages.

    ii. Appropriate plans have been made by the host(s) to limit the amount of alcohol, to provide food and nonalcoholic beverages, to control noise, and to ensure that the event does not have a negative impact on the comfort of area residents. 

    b.The host(s) will then complete the Alcoholic Beverages Registration Form which requires the signature of the residence coordinator. In addition, the signature of the host(s) who will be assuming responsibility for the event must be on the form. These signatures indicate acceptance of the responsibility to assist in planning the event, agreement to be present at the event for its entire duration, and to enforce all applicable laws and policies. The approved Alcohol Beverage Authorization must be posted in a public place at the location alcohol is being served.  

    c.If alcoholic beverages are dispensed at no charge, the residence coordinator must approve the hosts’ plans for staffing the alcohol service, including age identification/“proofing” and serving. The residence coordinator may refuse to approve a registration based upon inadequate planning or perceived lack of commitment to enforce college policy and the law.
  4. Alcoholic beverages may only be served within the hours indicated and at the location stated on the registration form, and cannot be removed from the location.  
  5. The host(s) will prevent disruptive and excessive noise, which may be disturbing to area residents, and be accountable for the behavior of his or her guests.

B. Other Campus Facilities:

  1. Small, private gatherings may be held inside other campus facilities as permitted in this policy and in locations as designated by the individual dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building.
  2. In the small, private gathering category, the maximum number who may gather is 50. Large events must take place in specific programming spaces that have been made available on campus and designated for this purpose by the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building. The college holds the host(s) responsible for the use of alcohol and the actions of those in attendance at the small private gathering, and all present are expected to comply with the laws and policies governing alcohol and will be held accountable for such.
  3. Small, private gatherings must be registered with the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building, as outlined below, no less than five business days prior to the event, and notice forwarded to the New York State University Police. Registration forms are available from the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building and distribution is noted on the form.

    a.  The registration will be approved if:
    i. The sponsor/host(s) have made plans for enforcing and indicate an intent to adhere to all campus policies and state and local laws governing the sale, service, provision, possession, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.
    ii. Appropriate plans have been made by the sponsor/host(s) to limit the amount of alcohol, to provide food and nonalcoholic beverages, to control noise, and to ensure that the event does not have a negative impact on other normal activities in the vicinity.

    b. When making space reservations, the sponsor of an activity will check with the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building(s) in which the event is planned to determine designated spaces where alcoholic beverages can be served.

    c.The sponsor will then complete the Alcoholic Beverages Registration Form, which requires the signature of the dean, chair, or director responsible for the space. In addition, the sponsor will obtain the signature of the faculty or staff member and the host(s) who will be assuming responsibility for the event. These signatures indicate acceptance of the responsibility to assist in planning the event, agreement to be present at the event for its entire duration, and to enforce all applicable laws and policies.  The approved Alcohol Beverage Authorization must be posted in a public place at the location alcohol is being served.

    d.If alcoholic beverages are dispensed at no charge, the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building must approve the hosts’ plans for staffing the alcohol service, including age identification/“proofing” and serving.  The dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building may require professional staffing and/or refuse to approve a registration based upon inadequate planning or perceived lack of commitment to enforce college policy and the law.
  4. Alcoholic beverages may only be served within the hours indicated at the location stated on the registration form, and cannot be removed from the location. Service of alcoholic beverages may not exceed midnight at functions scheduled on Sunday through Thursday and may not exceed 1:30 a.m. for functions scheduled Friday and Saturday.  
  5. Hours for events must conform with building hours unless prior approval for an extension has been obtained. Serving of alcoholic beverages must end one-half hour prior to the end of the function. All activity must end by the determined closing time of the program.
  6. The host(s) will prevent disruptive and excessive noise, which may be disturbing to normal functions in the vicinity, and be held accountable for the behavior of his or her guests.
  7. Guests must be accompanied by a Purchase College student, faculty, or staff member who is responsible for the behavior of the guests. Problems caused by guests without an identifiable host or hostess will be the responsibility of the sponsor.
  8. Sponsoring groups are responsible for the condition of the facility at the end of an event. Organizations or individuals will be charged for any custodial work required and/or any damage. In addition, future use of campus facilities may be denied.

VII. Special policies for larger, open, or public events

A. Larger events, or events that are open to the public, that include alcoholic beverages are permitted in College buildings, and in designated spaces outdoors, under directives of this policy. The dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building may designate specific programming spaces where these events can occur and may establish additional regulations pertaining to such events. The dean, chair, or director responsible for managing should discuss with the host(s) prior to registering the event.

B. Larger events or events that are open to the public must be registered with the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building or area they are held, as outlined below, no less than five business days prior to the event, and notice forwarded to the New York State University Police. Registration forms are available from the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building and distribution is noted on the form.

  1. The registration will be approved if:

    a. The sponsor/host(s) have made plans for enforcing and indicate an intent to adhere to all campus policies and state and local laws governing the sale, service, provision, possession, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.
    b. Appropriate plans have been made by the sponsor/host(s) to limit the amount of alcohol, to provide food and nonalcoholic beverages, to control noise, and to ensure that the event does not have a negative impact on other normal activities in the vicinity.
  2. When making space reservations, the sponsor of an activity will check with the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building(s)/area(s) in which the event is planned to determine designated spaces where alcoholic beverages can be served.
  3. The sponsor will then complete the Alcoholic Beverages Registration Form which requires the signature of the dean, chair, or director responsible for the space.  In addition the sponsor will obtain the signature of the faculty or staff member and the host(s) who will be assuming responsibility for the event. These signatures indicate acceptance of the responsibility to assist in planning the event, agreement to be present at the event for its entire duration, and to enforce all applicable laws and policies. The approved Alcohol Beverage Authorization must be posted in a public place at the location alcohol is being served.
  4. If alcoholic beverages are dispensed at no charge, the dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building must approve the hosts’ plans for staffing the alcohol service, including age identification/“proofing” and serving. The dean, chair, or director responsible for managing the building may require professional staffing and/or refuse to approve a registration based upon inadequate planning or perceived lack of commitment to enforce college policy and the law.
  5. If alcoholic beverages are to be dispensed at a fee, the alcohol service must be contracted to the college’s Food Service. Any waiver from this requirement must be obtained, in writing, from the college’s contract administrator.

C. Alcoholic beverages may only be served within the hours indicated at the location stated on the registration form, and cannot be removed from the location. Service of alcoholic beverages may not exceed midnight at functions scheduled on Sunday through Thursday and may not exceed 1:30 a.m. for functions scheduled Friday and Saturday. 

D. Hours for events must conform with building hours unless prior approval for an extension has been obtained. Serving of alcoholic beverages must end one-half hour prior to the end of the function. All activity must end by the determined closing time of the program.

E. Guests must be accompanied by a Purchase College student, faculty, or staff member who is responsible for the behavior of the guests. Problems caused by guests without an identifiable host or hostess will be the responsibility of the sponsor.

F. For any event of this type where more than 50 people are in attendance, a separate area must be designated and secured for serving alcoholic beverages. It must be designed or planned so that only persons 21 years of age or older may enter this area to serve or be served. For any event of this type, beverages may not be passed outside this area. Nonalcoholic beverages and food must be available in all areas of the event. Where it is anticipated that more than 50 people will be in attendance, a faculty/staff supervisor must be present throughout the event.

G. Sponsoring groups are responsible for the condition of the facility at the end of an event. Organizations or individuals will be charged for any custodial work required and/or any damage. In addition, future use of campus facilities may be denied.

H. If it is deemed necessary to ensure the safety of individuals or of property at large event, the dean, chair, or director responsible for the building may require University police officers to be assigned. The cost for this extra service will be charged to the sponsor.

I. The availability of alcoholic beverages must not be the central focus of the advertising for the event through direct or indirect reference. If the availability of alcohol is mentioned in advertising, the availability of nonalcoholic beverages must also be included.

Annual Notification and Distribution Policy - Drug-Free Schools and Campuses

Annual Notification Procedure:

  • A campus email will be sent out each fall and spring semester to students by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee, and annually to faculty/staff by the Director of Human Resources or designee that includes where the biennial review can be found online. These annual notification emails will also include text that states “Standards of Conduct, possible legal sanctions and penalties; statements of the health risks associated with alcohol and other drug abuse, programs and resources available, and campus disciplinary sanctions for violations of the standards of conduct can be found online at for faculty/staff https://www.purchase.edu/offices/hr/policies-and-procedures/  for students https://www.purchase.edu/offices/student-affairs/policies-and-procedures/
  • The notification will also be contained in the packet of information sent to new hires by Human Resources.
  • Human Resources will also post hard copies on bulletin boards for staff that are not email users that states where hard copies of the policy can be procured.

Biennial Review Process:

  • Beginning with the summer 2017 and continuing every two years, the biennial review committee will meet and will review the past two years AOD programs for Students and for Faculty/Staff.
  • The review committee will consist of representatives from The Office of Community Standards, the Counseling Center, Health Services, University Police, Human Resources, and the Office of Community Engagement.
  • The committee will meet as many times as necessary to complete the review and make determinations regarding any programmatic changes that they will recommend.
  • The committee will be chaired by the Wellness Center Director.
  • Committee will complete the biennial review, and submit the meeting minutes, biennial review draft (including recommendations and rationales) to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Director of Human Resources for approval.  The College President will issue final approval and sign the report.
  • The committee will review AOD program usage statistics, disciplinary statistics as they relate to AOD, information and reports from the first year student required alcohol course (currently AlcoholEdu, but subject to change), the Clery report, the Core Survey, and any other appropriate data.
Controlled Substance Policy

I. Preamble
Purchase College is committed to developing and maintaining the health, stability and well-being of the collegiate learning environment. The college considers the possession, use, sale, and other distribution of illegal drugs to be detrimental to the individual student and to the education process.

A.   The use of illegal drugs is a threat to the health of the individual and also interferes with the efficient pursuit of the individual’s educational goals.

B. The presence of drugs is detrimental to the entire educational community. Their presence interferes with the educational development and creative process.

C. Possession, use, sale, or other distribution of illegal drugs violates federal, state and local laws. The college expects adherence to these laws. No special exemption from civil or criminal law exists for members of a college community.

II. The Policy
In order to protect the educational environment and safeguard the health and well-being of the individual and the community, the college policy concerning illegal drugs will be as follows:

A.  The possession, use, sale, or other distribution of narcotics, hallucinogenics or controlled substances (except as permitted by law) on the campus by any student, employee, or visitor, will be considered a serious offense.

B.  The use, sale, or possession of any drug paraphernalia, including, but not limited to, water pipes, bongs, and hypodermic syringes/needles not prescribed by a licensed physician will be subject to disciplinary action.

III. Enforcement

A.  New York State University Police officers are authorized to arrest violators of drug laws. Should conditions warrant, the college may ask assistance of other law enforcement or investigative agencies. These agencies also have the legal right to operate on the campus without consulting the college. The college cannot and will not shield violators of drug laws from law enforcement agencies.

B.  Violations of these policies will result in disciplinary or administrative action, as well as criminal prosecution whenever possible. Campus disciplinary action will be taken through administrative discipline processes for employees and through the discipline process for students. 

C.  Sanctions for specific controlled substance offenses by students are outlined in the Student Code of Conduct. Consequences for employees may include termination or dismissal.

D. The college provides confidential counseling, educational programs, and other services for those students seeking assistance for problems related to the use of illegal drugs.

Fraternity and Sorority Policy

Purchase College does not officially recognize fraternities or sororities on its campus. However, upon request, the college will allow such organizations to use space on campus, as available, to the same extent it provides space to other student organizations.

Good Samaritan Policy

Good Samaritan Policy

The health and safety of students is always our highest priority at Purchase College. However, students or others may be reluctant to get immediate medical or other professional assistance or provide it to others, because of concerns that their own behavior may be a violation of the Community Standards Code of Conduct and/or law. To minimize any hesitation students or student organizations may have in obtaining help for themselves or others due to these concerns, Student Affairs has developed the following “Good Samaritan” approach:  

Although policy violations cannot be overlooked, Purchase College will consider the positive impact of reporting an incident when determining the appropriate response for policy violations. In such cases, any possible negative consequences for the reporter of the problem will be evaluated against the possible negative consequences for the student who needed assistance in determining responsibility and/ or potential sanctions. At a minimum, students or student organizations should make an anonymous report by calling University Police at (914) 251-6900 to get the student in need in touch with professional helpers.

Examples where this approach would apply include:

•A student is reluctant to call an RA/CA or University Police when a friend becomes unconscious following excessive consumption of alcohol because the reporting student is under the age of 21 and was also consuming alcohol.

•A student is reluctant to report that he/she has been sexually assaulted because he/she had been consuming alcohol and is under the age of 21.

•A student is reluctant to call University Police when another student becomes ill or unconscious following excessive consumption or alcohol at a student organization event, because the reporting student is afraid that his/her organization will get in trouble. 

Note:  Adapted from Buffalo University’s Good Samaritan Policy with permission.

Guest Policy

Purchase College is committed to creating a safe environment for all members of the campus community. The college welcomes the participation of guests of the campus community at most events and facilities on the campus. This policy governs the behavior of guests and the responsibility of campus hosts.

  • A guest is defined as any person not affiliated with Purchase College.
  • A residential guest is defined as any person, student, or guest who is visiting a room/apartment on campus and is not assigned to that particular residential complex room.
  • After quiet hours, any person not assigned to a particular residential complex must have an overnight guest pass, including other residential students.
  • Students may not permit or assist another person to stay in a college facility without appropriate registration.
  • Hosts are responsible for the behavior of their guests at all times. Failure to comply with the guest policy may result in restriction of a resident’s privilege to visit a building or host guests.
  • Hosts must escort their guests at all times.

o    Hosts must ensure that their guest(s) maintain a valid guest pass on their person and present it to any college official who requests it and is acting within the official’s authority. Valid guest passes are obtained when a valid federal or state photo ID is shown.

  • All non-residents (including commuter students) must have a guest pass in order to be present within the on-campus residence halls and apartments, including off-campus accommodations.

Residential Guest Policy

  • All occupants of a room/apartment must provide permission to any guest to be present in their space. Roommate(s) signature(s) of verification is/are required to obtain overnight guest passes.
  • Residents must remain with all registered guests and students when they are in their assigned room/apartment.
  • A residential guest is defined as any person, student, or guest who is visiting a room/apartment on campus and is not assigned to that particular residential complex and room.
  • An overnight guest cannot stay in the residence hall/apartment for more than six nights per calendar month.
  • Guests may not stay in the hall for more than three consecutive nights.
  • Students may not have residential guests under the age of 17 without written parental/guardian consent.
  • Each resident of a room/suite may host no more than two overnight guests; total occupancy must never exceed the maximum occupancy of a resident’s assigned space.

o    Regardless of the maximum occupancy, room/apartments must have an accessible exit and entrance, clear of obstruction.

  • Residential students’ non-overnight guests should not exceed the maximum occupancy of their room:

o    For units designed as a residence hall single – four people
o    For units designed as a residence hall double – eight people
o    For units designed as a residence hall triple – eight people
o    For units designed as a residence hall suite – 12 people
o    For apartment units designed for three people – 10 people
o    For apartment units designed for four people – 16 people
o    For apartment units designed for six people – 24 people
o    For apartment units designed for eight people – 24 people

Hoverboard Policy

Purchase College, SUNY prohibits the use of self-balancing scooters, more popularly known as hoverboards, because of recent concerns by the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the potential impact these devices may have on campus safety and the threat they pose with regards to fire.

Hoverboards include self-balancing scooters, battery operated scooters, and hands-free segways and will not be permitted on campus, in any buildings or residence halls.

Institutional Response to Alcohol and Other Drugs/Biennial Review

President’s Message

Dear Purchase College Community, 

The College is committed to providing a learning environment which is healthy and productive and which supports the intellectual, aesthetic, physical and social development of individual students. In compliance with the Federal Drug Free School and Communities Act of 1989, this brochure sets forth the policies and standards of conduct which will be assigned for violation of these policies, but it also provides information concerning the availability of counseling and treatment possibilities for those in difficulty.  I am asking for your help and cooperation.  I hope you will read this booklet, abide by the regulations, and join me in my commitments to creating a productive, drug-free learning and living environment. 

Sincerely, 
Thomas Schwarz,
President 

PHILOSOPHY 
Purchase College is committed to developing and maintaining the health, stability, and well being of the collegiate learning environment.  The College considers possession, use, sale, and/or other distribution of illegal drugs to be detrimental to the individual student and to the educational process.  In addition, the College considers underage use and/or possession of alcohol and supplying/selling alcohol to those under the legal drinking age to be detrimental to the individual student and to the educational process. 

1. The use of illegal drugs is a threat to the health of the individual and also interferes with the efficient pursuit of  individual educational goals. 

2. The presence of illegal drugs is detrimental to the entire educational community.  Their presence interferes with the educational, developmental and creative process. 

3. Possession, use, sale or other distribution of illegal drugs  violates federal, state, and local laws.  The College expects  adherence to these laws.  No special exemption from civil or  criminal law exists for members of a college community. 

4. Underage possession/use of alcohol, and sale or other  distribution of alcohol to those under the legal drinking age  violates federal, state, and local laws.  The College expects  adherence to these laws.  No special exemption from civil or  criminal law exists for members of a college community.

Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy


Employees
New York State Prohibits on-the-job use or impairment from alcohol and controlled substances.  An employee may be required to undergo medical testing if a supervisor has a reasonable suspicion that he or she is unable to perform duties due to the use of drugs or alcohol.

The unlawful use, possession, dispensing, manufacturing or distribution of controlled substances in all College work locations is prohibited.  Employees who unlawfully use, possess, dispense, manufacture, or distribute controlled substances will be subject to disciplinary procedures consistent with applicable laws, rules, regulations, and collective bargaining agreements.  Employees must notify the College’s Personnel Office of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace, or at a work site, no later than five (5) working days after such conviction.

Enforcement
If the cause of the work impairment is found to be drug or alcohol related, the Director of Human Resources in conjunction with the employee’s supervisor, may refer the employee to voluntary and confidential participation in the statewide Employee Assistance Program.  Other available options include pursuing disciplinary leave procedures or other disciplinary measures.

Violations of the State policy on alcohol and other substance abuse in the workplace may constitute grounds for disciplinary action pursuant to Section 75 of the Civil service Law or the Disciplinary Articles of collectively negotiated agreements.

Congress passed the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989.  The following is the Alcohol and Other Drugs Policy for employees and students at Purchase College.  The term “controlled substances” as used herein refers to the hundreds of chemicals listed by the federal government in the Controlled Substance Act.

Students
No person shall possess, use, sell, or in any other way distribute narcotics, hallucinogens or controlled substances.

The use, sale, or possession of any drug paraphernalia, including but not limited to water pipes, bongs, and hypodermic syringes/needles not prescribed by a licensed physician will be subject to confiscation and disciplinary action.

Alcohol Policy


No person shall possess, sell, or give away alcoholic beverages without proper authorization in any building or on any property owned or controlled by Purchase College.  Alcohol is permitted in students’ rooms within some residence halls and apartments if at least one resident of the room is over the legal drinking age, provided that no person under the age of 21 possesses or consumes said alcoholic beverages. Open containers may not be possessed anywhere on campus outside of individual residences unless so authorized in accordance with College regulations, local ordinances, and State law.  Kegs and beer balls are not permitted in the residence areas and will be confiscated.  The College holds persons responsible for their conduct at all times, including behaviors which occur under the influence of alcohol, and persons violating these policies will be subject to disciplinary action.

Enforcement
1.  University Police Officers are authorized to arrest violators  of  alcohol and/or drug laws.    If conditions warrant, the  College may ask assistance of other law enforcement or investigative agencies. These agencies also have the legal  right to operate on the campus without consulting the College.  The College cannot and will not shield violators of alcohol and/or drug laws from law enforcement agencies.

2. Violations of these policies will result in disciplinary  and/or administrative action, as well as criminal prosecution  whenever feasible.  Campus disciplinary action will be taken through the appropriate administrative discipline processes  for employees and for students. Consequences may include  termination or dismissal.

3. The College provides confidential counseling, educational  programs, and other services for students seeking assistance  related to the use of alcohol or illegal drugs.

Penalties for Drug Possession and Sale


Federal Penalties
The Federal Controlled Substances Act provides penalties of up to 15 years imprisonment and fines of up to $25,000 for unlawful distribution or possession with intent to distribute narcotics.  For unlawful possession of a controlled substance, a person is subject to one year of imprisonment and fines up to $5,000.  Any person who unlawfully distributes a controlled substance to a person under 21 years of age may be punished by up to twice the term of imprisonment and fine otherwise authorized by law.

Federal trafficking penalties for first offense Schedule I&II drugs range from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of life in prison and a fine of $1 million for an individual  or $10 million if not an individual.  Penalties for first offense trafficking Schedule III&IV drugs range up to 5 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 for an individual or $1 million if not an individual.  Federal penalties for first offense trafficking marijuana range up to a maximum of life in prison and up to $4 million fine for an individual or $10 million if not an individual, depending on the quantity of marijuana.

Types of Drugs

Schedule I:  Heroin, LSD, Mescaline, Psilocybin, other Hallucinogens, PCP, Quaaludes,  marijuana, china white, mushrooms, ecstasy, GHB and MDA.

Schedule II:  Morphine,  Methadone, Oxycontin, Demerol, Codeine, precedent, Fentanyl, Dilaudid, Seconal, Nembutal, Cocaine,Crack, Amphetamines, and other opium and opium extracts and narcotics.

Schedule III:  Certain barbiturates such as amobarbital and codeine containing medicines such as Fiorinal #3, Doriden, and codeine-based cough suppressants and all anabolic steroids.

Schedule IV: Barbiturates, narcotics and other stimulants including Valium, Talwin, Librium, Euqanil, Darvon, Darvocet, Placidyl, Tranzene, Serax, Ionamin (yellow jackets). 

Schedule V: Compounds that contain very limited amounts of codeine, dihydro-codeine, ethlymorphine, opium, and atromine (Robitussin AC). 

Schedule VI: Marijuana, THC, Hashish, Hash Oil, Tetrahydrocannabinol 

New York State Laws Regarding Alcohol Violations


Driving While Ability Impaired (BAC of .05 to .07)
 - $300-$500 fine, up to 15 days in jail and 90 days revocation of license.

Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) (BAC of .08 or more) - $500-$1000 fine, up to 1 year in jail and minimum 6-month license revocation.

Felony Driving While Intoxicated (second DWI conviction in 10 years) -  $1,000 -$5,000 fine, up to 4 years in prison and minimum of 1 year license revocation.

Procuring Alcohol for persons under the age of 21 - $200 fine, up to 5 days in jail or both.

Possession by persons under 21 - $50 fine per offense and/or completion of alcohol awareness program and/or community service.

Use of false ID for alcohol purchase - $100 fine, and/or community service, and/or completion of an alcohol awareness program, and/or revocation of driver’s license for 90 days.

New York State Penalties


The State of New York has established severe sanctions for the possession, use, and sale of controlled substances which are consistent with Federal penalties established for such.  The specific criminal sanctions are delineated in the New York State Penal Law.  The severity of the offense depends on the type and the quantity of the illegal substance, as well as the holder’s intent (personal use, distribution or sale).  For example, in New York State, the criminal possession of four or more ounces of cocaine is a class A-1 felony, punishable by a minimum of 15-25 years and a maximum of life in prison, and a maximum $100,000 fine.  Unlawful possession of a small quantity of marijuana is a violation, resulting in a fine of not more than $100 for the first offense.  Additional violations result in larger fines and the imposition of misdemeanor criminal charges, which include the establishment of a permanent record.

Health Risks


The use of illegal drugs, tobacco, and the abuse of alcohol may have serious health consequences, including damage of the heart, lungs and other organs.  Alcohol-related accidents are the number one cause of death for persons aged 15-24.  The most significant health risk, besides death, is addiction.  Chemical dependency is a disease that, if not arrested, is fatal.  No addict (including alcoholics and smokers) ever thought he/she would become addicted.

  • Abuse of alcohol and marijuana during puberty can result in an imbalance of sex hormones resulting in reduced muscle mass and shrinkage of testicles in males and menstrual difficulties and infertility in females. 
  • The risk of breast cancer is increased by 30% among women who consume 3 or more alcoholic drinks per day. 
  • The use of hallucinogens (LSD, PCP, Mescaline) can result in an irreversible drug induced psychotic state and/or delusions which may trigger life-threatening behavior. 
  • The use of cocaine or amphetamines greatly increases the risk of heart attack. 
  • Stimulants (“uppers”, speed, crack, methyl, crystal) may cause permanent damage to the brain, heart, lungs, and other organs from long-term use. 
  • Medical consequences of alcohol abuse include liver damage and disease, gastrointestinal problems and brain damage, as well as causing injury to a fetus during pregnancy. 
  • Inhalants (“poppers”, rush, laughing gas, glue, pain thinner) may cause mental confusion, mood swings, delusions and hallucinations. 
  • Depressants (“downers”, ludes, reds, 714s, barbs) greatly increase the risk of car crashes because they affect vision, judgment, coordination and physical skills. 
  • In cases of rape, 75% of the men and 55% of the women involved had been using alcohol or other drugs.
  • Research has shown that the strongest predictor of suicide is alcoholism. People with substance use disorders are about six times more likely to commit suicide than the general population. Roughly one in three people who die from suicide are under the influence of drugs, typically opiates such as oxycodone or heroin, or alcohol. (Psychology Today February 20, 2014 article).

About Alcohol


In addition to the immediate dangers from drinking at a single event, there are dangers from patterns of drinking.  Some people drink for unhealthy reasons and it can cause negative consequences in their lives.  They are alcohol abusers, or problem drinkers.  For others (as many as 13% of college males and 5% of college females), the drinking has progressed even further, to alcoholism. 

The following are warning signals that may indicate a problem in your drinking pattern:

  • Missed classes or work due to hangovers; unfulfilled academic potential or even failing grades due to drinking. 
  • Accidents and injuries due to drinking. 
  • Blackouts (inability to remember something that happened while drinking). 
  • Doing something (for example, a sexual act) contrary to one’s values while under the influence of alcohol. 
  • Fights and arguments, loss of friends or lovers, due to drinking. 
  • Drinking alone to relieve anxiety, depressions, boredom or loneliness. 
  • Drinking to feel socially confident.

Why is alcohol considered a dangerous drug?
The consumption of alcohol is considered by some experts to be the leading cause of death in the U.S. Today.

Alcohol is a drug that significantly affects all body systems, contributing to the incidence of cancer, heart disease, liver disease, digestive disorders, and brain dysfunction.  In fact, its contributions to these problems is greater than that of any other known legal or illegal drug.

Alcohol impairs judgment in very specific ways:  it may make on “feel” as if he or she is doing better than he or she is.  You feel more attractive, wittier, and more in control of the situation – thus, the temptation to take extraordinary risks.  The awareness of being impaired is reduced!

Resources


Assistance and information can be obtained from the following:

Purchase College:
Counseling Center - (914) 251-6390
Director of Wellness  - (914) 251-6665
Wellness Counselor - (914) 251-6657
Health Services - (914) 251-7925
University Police - (914) 251-6900
Student Affairs - (914) 251-6030
Community Engagement - (914) 251-6320
Human Resources - (914) 251-6090
Employee Assistance Coordinator - (914) 251-6098

Off Campus:
Alcoholics Anonymous - (914) 949-1200
Al-Anon - (914) 946-1748
Cocaine/Crack Hotline - (888) 883-0988 
National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence - (800) 622-2255
NYS Hope Line - (877) 846-7369) (HOPENY)
Narcotics Anonymous - (800) 974-0062

To request a copy of the Biennial Review in its entirety, please contact one of the following:

SAF@purchase.edu 
wellness@purchase.edu
human.resources@purchase.edu
EAP@purchase.edu

Leaves and Withdrawals

Taking a Leave of Absence or Voluntarily Withdrawing from Purchase College and Other Administrative Action

Note: Additional information on official withdrawal and leaves of absence, including links to the needed forms, is available under Leaves and Withdrawals (Office of the Registrar).

OFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL
An official withdrawal is a permanent withdrawal from the college. To apply for an official withdrawal, complete and submit this form:
Official Withdrawal from the College

PERSONAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE
A personal leave of absence can be taken for issues of a personal nature (financial, travel, employment, etc.). To apply for a personal leave of absence, complete and submit this form:
Request for Personal Leave of Absence

ACADEMIC LEAVE OF ABSENCE
An academic leave can be taken for issues of an academic nature (i.e., taking classes at another institution).  In order to take an academic leave, you must contact the Office of the Registrar (located in the Student Service Building, First Floor), where you will be provided with an approval form giving you permission to study off-campus and permission to transfer the credits back to Purchase College. To return from an academic leave of absence, you need only register for classes and apply for on campus housing if needed. (Please note that on-campus housing is limited and is not guaranteed for students returning from academic leaves of absence; contact Residence Life at (914) 251-6320 for specific information related to on campus housing). If you do not return from your academic leave, you will be administratively withdrawn from the college and will need to re-apply if you choose to return at a later date.  For additional questions and/or assistance, please contact the Office of the Registrar at (914) 251-6360.

MEDICAL LEAVE OF ABSENCE 
A medical leave can be taken for issues of a medical nature (i.e., injury, illness, substance-related issues, mental health issues, etc.). In order to take a medical leave, you must submit supporting documentation. Acceptable documentation would be a letter or note from your physician, psychologist, or counselor, on their letterhead, which indicates the following: (1) the reason you are requesting a medical leave, including your diagnosis; (2) the date of initial treatment; (3) the dates of subsequent treatment (if applicable); and (4) the expected semester of recovery. 

If your request is related to a mental health and/or substance related condition, you must schedule an appointment (health permitting) and submit documentation to the Counseling Center (located in the Humanities Building, Basement Level, Room 0009). For specific questions, contact the Counseling Center at (914) 251-6390. 

If your request is related to any other medical condition, including a traumatic injury, accident, or illness, you must schedule an appointment (health permitting) and submit documentation to Student Health Services (located in Campus Center South, Lower Level). For specific questions, contact Student Health Services at (914) 251-6380. 

Students who take mid-semester approved medical leaves are given W grades. Students who are enrolled in the college health insurance plan will continue to be covered until the end of the enrollment period (either January or August, whichever comes first), even if they leave school on a medical leave. If you continue your medical leave of absence beyond that semester, you will not be eligible to enroll in the college health insurance plan until you return to active full-time status. Students on medical leaves who are insured on non-college policies should check eligibility for continuing coverage with their insurance companies. While we realize that there may be extenuating exceptions, deadlines for mid-semester medical leaves are as follow:

  • Before November 15 for fall semesters
  • Before April 15 for spring semesters
  • The same as the withdrawal deadline for summer and winter sessions

Students on medical leaves may be eligible to register for campus housing and for classes based on their completed credits during the time of their leave. To be eligible for pre-registration, the student must have their treatment provider submit a preliminary letter that indicates that the student is currently undergoing treatment and is expected to be able to return to active student status for the semester in question (i.e., summer, fall, spring). That letter should be submitted by the treatment provider to either Health Services or the Counseling Center – whichever department originally recommended the medical leave. Once the letter is received, the student will receive an email communication from the associate dean of student affairs informing the student of the date(s) that the account hold will be lifted to allow for registration. Following registration, the hold will be replaced on the student’s account pending final re-entry assessment clearance as outlined below. In the event that the student does not return through the process or is denied reentry through the process, the student will be deregistered as follows:

• May 5 for summer session courses 
• August 10 for fall semester courses
• December 10 for winter semester courses
• January 10 for spring semester courses 

Although a request for return will be assessed whenever requested by a student, a medical leave is generally for a period of no less than six months. If a medical leave is needed for more than a year, a request for an extension must be made in writing by the student for the subsequent year. Please note that a return from a medical leave of absence requires approval from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs following a re-entry assessment process. The medical leave return process must happen before the first day of classes for the semester that the student is planning to return. The re-entry process can be scheduled as follows: 

• After April 15 for summer session returns
• After July 15 for fall semester returns 
• After December 1 for winter session returns 
• After December 15 for spring semester returns 

Below are links to the forms necessary for return: 

Counseling return from medical leave forms:
Procedure for Re-enrollment from a Medical Leave of Absence

Health Services return from medical leave form:
Health Services Re-Entry Procedure

In reviewing requests for return from medical leave, we look for evidence that the issues that led to your inability to perform have been addressed. Specifically, evidence that you have maintained stability and demonstrated follow-through with treatment for a sufficient period of time to enable you to be a successful student. Additionally, evidence of productive functioning (i.e., employment, volunteerism, etc.) is looked upon favorably. In order to be approved for return, you must have complied with any recommendations given to you for treatment at the time of your medical leave. 

For specific questions related to returning from a mental health and/or substance-related medical leave, contact the Counseling Center at (914) 251-6390. For specific questions related to returning from any other medical condition, contact Health Services at (914) 251-6380.

If you are planning to live on campus, you will also need to have a housing re-entry eligibility assessment with the Office of Community Engagement (OCE) and to apply for on-campus housing. Please note that on-campus housing is limited and is not guaranteed for students returning from medical leaves of absence. Although students returning from medical leaves receive priority for housing, there is no guarantee that housing will be provided. Therefore, it is in your best interest to complete your re-entry assessment as close to the above dates as possible. Students returning from leave should explore off-campus options in case campus housing is unavailable. Please contact the OCE at (914) 251-6320 for specific information related to on-campus housing.

If you have not returned from or re-applied to extend your medical leave, you will be administratively withdrawn from the college after one year and will need to apply for readmission to the college if you choose to return at a later date.

Administrative Actions

Change in student status

A. Interim Suspension and Interim Residence Suspension
When in the judgment of the conduct officer and/ or the director of residence life (in consultation with the conduct officer) the continued presence of an accused person at the college presents an immediate danger to the fulfillment of the educational mission of the college or to the life, health, welfare, safety or property of any member(s) of the college community, the accused person may be subject to a change in student status including immediate denial of campus residency and/or suspension from the college pending the outcome of an initial conference or disciplinary hearing which shall be scheduled as expeditiously as possible.

Such a recommendation would be communicated to the vice president for student affairs or designee who will review the recommendation and gather and consider whatever additional information may be needed, and will determine if any change in status is warranted. Notification of any change of the student’s status and the reasons for it will be communicated to the student, in writing, within 24 hours of the decision. The accused will be provided with a specification of charges and the terms of the immediate action changing student status. This action may be taken, but is not limited to, situations involving physical and/or sexual violence, drugs, and other controlled substances. 

B. Administrative relocations
If a resident student fails to comply with the conditions set forth in the residence license agreement (e.g. adhering to special interest housing expectations) he/she may be subject to reassignment. Such administrative action is not subject to thecdisciplinary appeals process, but will involve discussion with the student.

  1. Resident students who violate the terms and conditions of the residence license agreement in a manner which jeopardizes the health and safety of themselves or others are subject to reassignment and/or removal from campus housing. Such administrative action is not subject to the disciplinary appeals process, but shall involve discussion with the student.

C. Involuntary medical leaves of absence
The college maintains a health center and a counseling center to serve physical and emotional needs of students. Students whose needs are beyond the resources of these offices will be referred to off-campus facilities and service providers when possible. However, students who cannot adequately be helped by the available facilities and/or refuse to accept recommended emotional and/or medical treatment and whose resulting behavior renders them unable to effectively function in the residential or college community; that is, without harming others or disrupting the college community may be required to leave the college following the described procedure below:

  1. The associate dean of student affairs and/or the vice president for student affairs or designee may require a mandatory assessment if a student’s condition renders him/her unable to function in the college community without harming others and/or disrupting the educational mission of the institution.
  2. When in the opinion of a professional member of the counseling or health center staff a student is unable to be adequately helped by the center or by other available facilities, and the student’s condition renders them unable to function in the college community without harming others and/or disrupting the educational mission of the institution, the staff member shall notify the vice president for student affairs or designee of the situation as soon as possible.
  3. When the vice president for student affairs receives notification under either (1) or (2), described above, the vice president for student affairs or his/her designee will review appropriate documentation and make a decision regarding the student’s status. Failure to appear for a mandated assessment will result in an involuntary medical leave of absence without further process. If the vice president for student affairs determines that the student should leave the College, the vice president for student affairs or his/her designee may inform the student’s parent, spouse, or other close relative.
  4. Although a request for return will be assessed whenever requested by a student, involuntary medical leaves of absence are generally for a period of no less than six months. A student may apply for re-enrollment by following the re-enrollment process described in the procedures for re-enrollment from a medical leave of absence.
Live Amplified Music Events

Live outdoor music on a nice day is a Purchase College tradition. Listening to the artistic expressions of your fellow students is both rewarding and relaxing!  If you are interested in having live amplified music events outside, please note the 4 step procedure. 

Step 1: Location 
For the outdoor areas within a particular residential living area (i.e. The Quad), permission must be received from the Residence Coordinator. This may be obtained via e-mail. Please note that it is Office of Residence Life policy that no live amplified music, specifically band practices, is allowed in the residential buildings for any reason. Additionally, please note that your request must be an actual program and not just a band practice. These requests will be denied immediately. 

For non-residential area (the mall, zones in front of Campus Centers North and South and Theater X), permission must be obtained from the Office of Student Life via e-mail (student.life@purchase.edu). 

Regardless of start time, no live amplified music is allowed after 11pm as this is a township ordinance. 

Step 2: Advance Notice 
You must contact the appropriate individual or office for this permission a minimum of two weeks in advance. This is necessary for the following reasons: 1) Proper notification must be given to University Police 2) Proper notification must be given to all other parties who may be impacted by the live music including residents, faculty, staff and students 

Step 3: Required Information 
When contacting either the Residence Coordinator or the Office of Student Life, please note that the following information is required. If granted permission, deviation from any of the specifics you provided may result in the immediate cancellation of your event so please be as accurate as possible. 

1) Day, time and length of your event 
2) Number of individuals involved and their roles 
3) Expected attendance 
4) Will attendance be primarily Purchase College students or will there be off-campus guests? If you are expecting off-campus guests, please provide the expected number. 
5) Does your event contain additional equipment (stage, lighting grid, trailers, generators, etc.) and/or require a vehicle for equipment drop-off? 

Pertaining to question #4, if your event is expected to attract a crowd of over 300 and/or a large number of off-campus guests, the policies that dictate a major student event will apply. This includes additional College personnel (UPD and custodial). University Police reserves the right to schedule additional officers and Facilities reserves the right to schedule additional custodial personnel to maintain both public safety and the grounds. If this is required, the cost of the extra coverage is the responsibility of the PSGA. Due to this, you must also contact them and receive their permission to hold your event. If they do not approve, we cannot approve. 

Pertaining to question #5, if your event contains additional equipment and/or vehicle drop off, again the policies that dictate a major student event will apply. This includes oversight from facilities to ensure that health and safety standards are met (set up, fire code, etc.) and temporary vehicle authorization. 

Step 4: Space Reservation 
Notification of event approval or disapproval will be made via e-mail to your Purchase College e-mail account within 72 hours of your request. If you are granted permission, you MUST reserve the space. Failure to reserve the space will nullify the event. 

Residential SpaceThe Residence Coordinator will state in the approval e-mail that you have also reserved the space. 

The mall, Theater X or the zones in front of Campus Centers North and SouthThe Office of Student Life will e-mail both the space manager for these locations and you to inform of approval. To reserve the space, you must utilize the new RMS system. This is accessible from the student portal page. If you do not know how to use this system, please contact the PSGA or the Office of Student Life and you will receive assistance.

Major Student Events

The college defines an event that has been advertised off campus and/or an expected attendance of more than 300 students as a “major student event”. 

Notification and Permission
The coordinating individual or group of the major student event must notify the Office of Community Engagement a minimum of two full weeks before the event. This can be done via email (CEG@purchase.edu). The email must contain the following information:

  • Name of event 
  • Individual or group coordinating the event 
  • Day and time 
  • Location 
  • Expected attendance 
  • Special arrangements needed (parking, vehicle authorization to restricted areas, etc.) 
  • Brief description (maximum of 500 words) including the listing of all performers (musical, comedy, etc.). If the performer is an off-campus performer and has a publicity website, please provide that link. 

Acknowledgment of receipt of the email will be sent within 48 business hours. Notification of permission to hold the event will be sent within 96 business hours from the time of receipt. Please note that your space reservation cannot be officially approved until you receive this permission.

Policy Rationale and Description
College policy dictates that the administration is responsible for maintaining a safe and secure environment for its student body. Major campus events—particularly those that attract large numbers of non-Purchase students and/or guests—provide a potential strain on both the administration and the University Police to uphold these measures. Please note that New York State University Police possesses the authority to cancel any event that poses safety and security concerns for the campus population. Potential concerns may include a performer’s history, crowd size, and/o amount of off-campus appeal.

Personnel Coverage
All major student events must have a staff member or organizational representative (student and/or professional) onsite to conduct “ID checks.” All attendees must have a valid Purchase College student More Card, a residential guest pass, or an event pass. It is the responsibility of the host organization to secure this staffing. The event cannot be held without this function.

The scope of the student event, including format type and expected attendance, may dictate the following extra personnel:

  • Facilities Management: needed for custodial and grounds (if the event is outdoors) upkeep 
  • University Police: needed for crowd control and emergency response/crisis intervention presence 
  • Harrison Township Sheriff Department: needed for crowd control and emergency response/crisis intervention presence

Please note that Harrison Township Sheriff Department officers will only be present at the current two staple PSGA major student events, Fall Fest and Culture Shock. Any additional PSGA major student events created in the future would fall under this categorization.

  • All personnel listed above would be defined as “extra coverage” and thus the financial responsibility for such overtime payment would be from the PSGA.

Locale Guidelines
Any event in which significant equipment (i.e., trailers, stage, generator, lighting grid, etc.) is brought onto campus by an outside organization must adhere to the following standards:

  • Any equipment that requires electrical output must have a member of the electrical department in Facilities Management present to ensure that arrangement meets campus measures. 
  • All equipment set-ups must be approved by the campus health and safety officer. The areas that he or she will be checking pertain to fire code (evacuation route marked and without obstacle, temporary location not too close to permanent structures, etc.).

Additional Information
Any off-campus vendor with a vehicle associated with the event must obtain a temporary parking permit. Only vehicles deemed crucial to the physical set-up of the event space (such as transporting equipment) can be granted temporary access to restricted areas. Restricted areas are fire lanes, walkways, and lawns. 

  • Any vehicle—campus official, student and/or off-campus vendor—that requires this temporary access to these restricted areas must gain authorization from the New York State University Police. Failure to do so may result in ticketing and/or towing. 
  • This authorization can be obtained via the notification email of the event to Office of Community Engagement.
  •  Any event that is outdoors and involves amplified music or equipment must conclude by 11 p.m. per township noise ordinance.
Missing Persons Policy

If a member of the Purchase College community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, he or she should immediately notify University Police at (914) 251-6911.

University Police will generate a missing person report and initiate an investigation. In addition to registering a general emergency contact, students residing in on-campus housing have the option to identify confidentially an individual to be contacted by Student Affairs in the event the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours.

If a student has identified such an individual, Student Affairs will notify that individual no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing. A student who wishes to identify a confidential contact can do so through the Student Affairs. A student’s confidential contact information will be accessible only by authorized campus officials and law enforcement in the course of the investigation.

After investigating a missing person report, should University Police determine that the student has been missing for 24 hours, Student Affairs will notify the student’s emergency contact no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing.

If the missing student is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated individual, Student Affairs will notify the student’s parent or legal guardian immediately after University Police has determined that the student has been missing for 24 hours.

New York State Education Department Complaint Notice

Persons should note that Purchase College administers internal procedures to receive, investigate, and resolve student complaints. Informal and formal means by which students can seek redress of grievances are identified through this document.

Students are assured of a reasonable and appropriate time frame for investigating and resolving a formal complaint, that final determination of each formal complaint will be made by a person or persons not directly involved in the alleged problem, and that assurances that no adverse action will be taken against a student filing a complaint and that notice to students about the state consumer complaint process has been made.

Informal and formal complaints should be initiated in the appropriate departments. In the absence of a timely response or resolution, a student should contact one of the following offices:

  • Office of Affirmative Action, Student Services Bldg., Third Floor, (914) 251-6086
  • Office of Human Resources, HR Bldg., (914) 251-6090
  • University Police Department, (914) 251-6900
  • Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, Student Services Bldg., Third Floor, (914) 251-6030
  • Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Student Services Bldg., Third Floor. (914) 251-6020
  • Office of the Vice President for Admissions, Administration Bldg., Second Floor, (914) 251-6300
  • Office of the Chief Financial Officer, Administration Bldg., Second Floor (914) 251-6067

In addition, in New York State, a complaint may be filed by any person with reason to believe that an institution has acted contrary to its published standards or that conditions at the institution appear to jeopardize the quality of the institution’s instructional programs or the general welfare of its students. Any person who believes he or she has been aggrieved by an institution may file a written complaint with the Office of College and University Evaluation.

How to File a Complaint 

  1. The person should first try to resolve the complaint directly with the institution by following the internal complaint procedures provided by the institution. An institution of higher education is required to publish its internal complaint procedure in a primary information document such as the catalog or student handbook. (The department suggests that the complainant keep copies of all correspondence with the institution.)
  2. If a person is unable to resolve the complaint with the institution or believes that the institution has not properly addressed the concerns, he or she may send a letter to the Office of College and University Evaluation.

Persons should not send a complaint to the Office of College and University Evaluation until he/she has read all the information below. This will assure that he/she is sending the complaint to the appropriate agency/office.

The Office of College and University Evaluation handles only those complaints that concern educational programs or practices of degree-granting institutions subject to the Regulations of the Commissioner of Education, with the exceptions noted below:

  • The office does not handle anonymous complaints
  • Complaints concerning programs in fields leading to professional licensure (e.g., nursing) should be directed to: Office of the Professions Professional Education Program Review Education Building, 2 West Albany, NY 12234
  • A complaint against a college in the State University system should be sent to: State University of New York Central Administration State University Plaza Albany, NY 12246
  • A complaint against a college in the City University system should be sent to: The City University of New York Central Administration 535 East 80th St. New York, NY 10021
  • A complaint involving discrimination against enrolled students on the part of an institution or faculty, or involving sexual harassment, should be filed with the U.S. Office for Civil Rights, 75 Park Place, New York, NY 10007. Complaints about two-year colleges concerning sexual harassment/discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender and disabilities may also be reported to the Office of Equity and Access, VATEA Program, 10th Floor, Education Building Addition, Hawk Street, Albany, NY 12234
  • A complaint of consumer fraud on the part of the institution should be directed to the Office of the New York State Attorney General, Justice Building, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12223.
  • The Office of College and University Evaluation does not intervene in matters concerning an individual’s grades or examination results, as these are the prerogative of the College’s faculty.
  • The Office of College and University Evaluation does not handle complaints concerning actions that occurred more than five years ago.
  • The Office of College and University Evaluation does not intervene in matters that are or have been in litigation.
  • For a complaint about state student financial aid matters, persons should contact the Higher Education Services Corporation Center at 1-888-NYS-HESC.

Complainants should be aware that the Office of College and University Evaluation does not conduct a judicial investigation and has no legal authority to require a college or university to comply with a complainant’s request.

If a complaint does not fall into one of the exceptions noted above, persons should contact the Office of College and University Evaluation at www.highered.nysed.gov/ocue/home.html.

Parental Notification Policy

In cases including medical emergency transports, involuntary medical leaves, students placed on disciplinary probation or given disciplinary reprimands related to alcohol/controlled substance where subsequent offenses could lead to suspension, interim suspension, interim residence suspension, residence suspension, suspension, and/or expulsion, the vice president for student affairs or his/her representative may notify parents of the separation and all circumstances surrounding the separation. 

Additionally, the vice president for student affairs or his/her representative may release information on a student if it is determined that there is an articulable and significant threat to the health or safety of the student or other individuals. This disclosure may be made to those persons whose knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals, and may include parents and guardians.  

Please refer to the Alcohol or Drug Use/Possession Disclosure Policy for additional parental notification information.  

Posting Material on Campus

Purchase College is resolute in its position that free inquiry and dialogue are the important foundation for higher education. The policy of the college on posting material on campus is intended to uphold these values. The policy also reflects the college’s right to place reasonable restrictions on the time, place, and manner of speech on campus.

 The intent of this policy is to serve as the overarching college policy on posting and set forth procedures for the orderly posting and distribution of print materials. It is in this context that recognized student organizations, departments, and offices of the college, and members of the college community may display signs, banners, posters, or other displays provided that they also meet the posting policy governing specific departments, schools, and organizations (e.g., PSGA).

1. Internal Groups/individuals

  1. Internal groups are defined as registered student organizations, campus governance units, academic units, campus departments/offices, and college committees. Individuals are members of the Purchase community by their affiliation with the college as students, faculty, staff, and administrators. Internal groups/individuals may place materials (e.g., posters, notices, flyers, announcements) on college bulletin boards or on general-purpose/open bulletin boards, in accordance with the following requirements:
  2. The use of department, office, or organization bulletin boards or surrounding area, including digital signage, shall be in accordance with the policies, procedures, and established practices within each department, office, or organization, and in alignment with this college-wide posting policy.
  3. No materials shall be affixed on any other surface (interior or exterior), including but not limited to buildings, doors, windows, interior walls, elevators, classroom chalkboards, trash receptacles, light poles, telephone poles, posts, pillars, trees, shrubs, building signs, retaining walls, fountains, vehicle windshields, or any object on the campus. The exception to this are private office doors of faculty, staff, and administrators.
  4. The hand-to-hand distribution of materials is permitted only when such activity does not disrupt or interfere with the educational, administrative, or operational activities of the college, the maintenance of campus property, or the free flow of traffic and persons. Reasonable efforts shall be made by the sponsoring college group to prevent and pick up litter as a result of the group’s hand-to-hand distribution of promotional materials.
  5. The use of tape, paint, or other substances used to convey a message on sidewalks, roadways, buildings, grounds (including snow and ice), or any other campus property is prohibited.
  6. Chalking is not permitted anywhere on campus, including sidewalks.
  7. Materials for events, programs, or services, including those open to the general public, shall include the following Disability Accommodation Statement: “Persons with disabilities seeking accommodations in order to participate fully in this event should contact [name of the program sponsoring organization] at [phone number and email address] in a timely fashion to allow making reasonable accommodations.” Assistance in arranging reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities is available from the Office of Disability Resources in the Student Services Building. However, the cost of providing reasonable accommodations must be paid by the sponsoring organization in accordance with policies and procedures for such arrangements. If an organization does not have funds sufficient to provide the accommodation, the organization should contact the Office of Disability Resources to make necessary arrangements.

2. External Groups/individuals

External is defined as those that are not registered student organizations, campus governance units, academic units, campus departments/offices or committees, or an individual registered student. Individuals and external groups are permitted to place materials (e.g., posters, notices, flyers, announcements) only on general-purpose/open bulletin boards located in the lobby area of each building, in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. Printed materials for commercial purposes shall pertain only to academic support, other services to students, and food.
  2. Noncommercial material by external groups is permitted. Some examples include:
    Invitations to audition for or participate in an off-campus music, dance, or theatrical production or visual art exhibition; publicity for lectures, concerts, and events at other college campuses; publicity for lectures, concerts, and events at local libraries; flyers for meetings of local political parties, committees, organized protests, and other political organizations; notice of scheduled religious services or holiday activities at a local church, mosque or synagogue; and notice or invitation to participate in off-campus volunteer activities, charitable societies, or community service activities.
  3. Posting party is responsible for timely removal of their posts from general- purpose/open bulletin boards.
  4. No material shall be affixed on any other surface (interior or exterior), including but not limited to buildings, doors, windows, interior walls, elevators, classroom bulletin boards, classroom chalkboards, trash receptacles, light poles, telephone poles, posts, pillars, trees, shrubs, building signs, retaining walls, fountains, sidewalks, roadways, vehicle windshields, any other areas of a building whether inside or outside, any other area of the campus, or any object on the campus.
  5. The use of tape, paint, or other substances used to convey a message on sidewalks, roadways, buildings, grounds (including snow and ice), or any other campus property is prohibited.

3. General Posting Requirements

  1. Posted material shall not include references to the sale or consumption of alcohol or other drugs.
  2. Posted material shall not promote or condone behavior that violates college policies or local, state, or federal law.
  3. Materials that infringe on the copyrighted or trademarked works of others are prohibited. Copyrighted and trademarked works may include, but are not limited to: logos, digital images, photographs, paintings, movies, videos, and written works.
  4. Access to posting space on college bulletin boards, and general-purpose/open bulletin boards is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
  5. Posted materials shall be made of paper or similar medium as appropriate for posting on a bulletin board. The preferred size is 8.5” by 11” or smaller. Posted materials shall not exceed 17” by 22.”
  6. No more than one copy of any given posted material shall be affixed to any college bulletin board, or general-purpose/open bulletin board.
  7. The posting of materials shall be performed by the sponsor. Likewise, the sponsor shall also be responsible for the prompt removal (within 24 hours) and proper disposal of all posted materials upon the conclusion of an event, program, or service.
  8. The distribution or posting of materials within campus residences shall be in accordance with OCE policies.
  9. The door-to-door distribution of materials in residence halls is not permitted. The only exception to this is the distribution of PSGA election materials.
  10. Digital signage policy is controlled and monitored by the department that owns the equipment.
  11. Academic class projects that may involve posting of materials could be exempted from this policy as long as the project has been approved by the faculty member for the course and the exemption from this policy is granted by the provost.
  12. Anyone posting materials in violation of this policy may be subject to disciplinary or legal action, as appropriate.
Probation and Housing Eligibility

The college is committed to creating residential environments—physical and social—that enhance students’ opportunities for academic and artistic success, and support and encourage responsible personal development. The Office of Community Engagement, which administers the housing program, is committed to those values and to providing residence halls and apartments for students who share those values. 

The college will provide housing for students who take their educational work seriously and who are contributing and responsible members of this vital artistic and academic community. For this reason, and in an effort to promote the living and learning environments in all of our residence areas, the college will not be providing housing to students who are on both academic and disciplinary probation. 

How will this policy be implemented?
Continuing students who are on either academic or disciplinary probation, or on both, will be able to participate in the room selection process and select a room. At the end of each semester, academic and disciplinary probation will be checked. Any student who is on both academic and disciplinary probation will be notified that his or her room has been cancelled and that he or she is not eligible for on-campus housing for the following semester. Once a student is removed from either academic or disciplinary probation, he or she will be eligible, upon request, to be placed on a waiting list for on-campus housing.

Return to Campus After Medical Admittance

Any student who has been admitted to a hospital must follow specific procedures to return to campus. The college will determine your appropriateness to return to the academic and/or residential environments, including planning for needed follow-up care, arranging for the completion of missed academic work, and assuring the safety and well-being of the whole campus community.

Before noon of the first business day following your return to campus, you must contact one of the following offices (as directed in your notification letter) to arrange an immediate appointment:

The Counseling Center at (914) 251-6390 for psychological-related admittances OR Health Services at (914) 251-7925 for physical-related admittances OR the Wellness Center at (914) 251-6665 for substance-related admittances (information will also be requested from the attending physician in the emergency room/hospital and campus police and student affairs reports).

Information necessary for re-entry evaluations at the college will include the admitting hospital’s lab work and treatment summary. If no additional lab work is performed at the admitting hospital, the lab work from the emergency department will be requested.  This information should be faxed from the hospital to the Counseling Center at (914) 251-6399 OR Health Services at (914) 251-6388, OR the Wellness Center at (914)251-5963 (as directed in your notification letter).

Additionally, the college reserves the right to require a reentry assessment with the Office of Community Engagement. If deemed appropriate, you will be directed to do so in your notification letter, and must contact the Office of Community Engagement at (914) 251-6320.

On the basis of the information provided during the above appointments, an administrative determination will be made about your ability to remain in school and in campus housing, and any special conditions on your continued attendance (i.e., part-time study only, residential status).

Following the completion of your reentry assessment, you will be contacted by the Office of Student Affairs via email to inform you of the administrative determination, and the appeal process (if appropriate).

For any questions regarding these procedures, contact the associate dean of student affairs at (914) 251-7988.

Significant Infectious Disease Policy

I. Preamble

Purchase recognizes that the contemporary college campus is not a refuge or haven from the epidemic of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), present in the larger communities of which the College is a part. The College will do everything possible to prevent people from being infected, to limit the consequences of established infection for individuals, and to provide a compassionate response to all affected individuals. 

II. The Policy: AIDS and HIV Infection

The College’s policies which derive from the currently available medical facts about HIV infection and AIDS, shall apply to all students, faculty, and staff or others using college facilities or services who have HIV infection. People with HIV infection may be healthy but have evidence of the infection because of the presence of an antibody of the virus in their blood; others have a condition meeting the criteria of the surveillance definition of AIDS itself, or one of the lesser symptomatic manifestations of infection (such as AIDS-related complex or progressive generalized lymphadenopathy).

This policy shall be reviewed on an annual basis by the college AIDS Task Force, which will make recommendations for changes and update in the policy to the college governance structure. In this review process and in recommended changes or updates, Purchase will use the best currently available medical information and statements, policies, and recommendations of the State University of New York Central Administration, the New York State Health Department, the American College Health Association, and the Centers for Disease Control of the United States Public Health Service. 

III. Prohibiting Discrimination against Faculty, Staff, Students, or Others Using College Facilities and Services: AIDS and HIV Infection

A. Non-Discrimination Policy
Faculty, staff, students or others using college facilities or services who have HIV infection or who have been diagnosed as having AIDS shall be protected from discrimination, and shall be considered as handicapped persons with a life limiting disease, as defined by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. In making decisions college officials shall guarantee the rights of these individuals. Existing support services for people with handicapping conditions can be appropriately and effectively utilized by students or employees disabled by HIV infections. College faculty, staff, or students, as part of their work or their educational program, shall not discriminate against people with HIV infection or AIDS diagnosed individuals, clients, or patients in the services offered, rendered or provided by the college.

  1. Faculty or staff members: Faculty or staff members who have HIV infection or who have been diagnosed as having AIDS shall be protected from discrimination in their employment. 
  2. Students: Students who have HIV infection or who have been diagnosed as having AIDS shall be protected from discrimination in their educational program, housing accommodations, food service, and related student services or opportunities. 

a. The existence of any form of HIV infection may not be considered in the initial admission decision for people applying to attend the institution.
b. Students who have HIV infection, whether they are symptomatic or not, should be allowed regular participation in their academic program of study in an unrestricted manner as long as they are physically and mentally able to meet the requirements of that participation.
c. Decisions on residential housing will be made on a case-by-case basis. The best currently available medical information does not indicate any risk to those sharing residence with HIV-infected individuals. However, in some circumstances there may be reasonable concern for the health of students with immune deficiencies (of any origin) when those students might be exposed to certain contagious diseases (e.g., measles or chicken pox) in a close living situation.


B. Enforcement
Individuals who have HIV infection or are diagnosed with AIDS and who feel they have been the subject of discrimination on that basis should contact the Affirmative Action Officer or the Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs for information about options concerning redress of the situation.  Violations of this anti-discrimination policy will be handled through appropriate disciplinary processes for students and for faculty and staff.

C. Notification to the College: Significant Infectious Disease Committee 
A faculty or staff member, or a student who has HIV infection or who has been diagnosed as having AIDS and who wishes to be covered under this policy or requests accommodations, should notify either the Director of Student Health Services, who shall convene the Significant Infectious Disease (SID) Committee. The SID Committee shall consider accommodations or restrictions only at the request of the individual. Members of the SID Committee are bound by the standards of confidentiality expressed in this policy. Individuals shall otherwise not be required to notify the College of their HIV status.
The SID Committee shall review and make recommendations regarding any reasonable accommodation or work place restrictions for a faculty or staff member who has HIV infection or who has been diagnosed as having AIDS. Similarly, the SID Committee shall review and make recommendations regarding any reasonable accommodations or restrictions on the educational programs or other college activities of a student who has HIV infection or who has been diagnosed with having AIDS. The College shall abide by the recommendations of the SID Committee, except that the President retains the right to modify or reject the Committee’s Recommendations.

D. HIV Testing

  1. College officials will not undertake programs of mandatory or “routine” testing of either student, faculty, or staff for HIV infection.  
  2. The College Health Services should be familiar with local sources of HIV testing, and should be able to refer students, faculty, or staff requesting tests. Referrals will only be made to test sites which are confidential or anonymous; which provide both pre-test and post-test counseling on site. In addition, Health Services staff as appropriate should be trained to counsel and educate persons seeking testing, using standards for pre-test and post-test counseling developed by the Centers for Disease Control, United States Public Health Service.

E. Confidentiality and Records: AIDS and HIV Infection
People known or suspected to have HIV infection, whether or not they have symptoms of illness, have sometimes been victims of discrimination and physical and/or psychological abuse. The potential for discrimination and mistreatment of these individuals, and/or persons thought to be at risk of infection requires that confidential information concerning any aspect of HIV infection be handled with extraordinary care.

  1. Standards
    Guidelines concerning the handling of confidential information about people with HIV infection follow the general standards included in the American College Health Association’s “Recommendation Standards and Practices for a College Health program” fourth edition. In general, no specific or detailed information concerning HIV infection or AIDS diagnosis should be provided to faculty, administrators, or even parents, without the expressed written consent of the person in each case except as mandated by court order. This position with respect to student records is supported by the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.  
  2. Release of Information
    No person, group, agency, insurer, employer, or institution may be provided any information related to the HIV status of a student, faculty, or staff member without the prior written consent of the individual, except as mandated by court order.
    a. Given the possibility of unintended or accidental compromise of the confidentiality of information, health officers should carefully weigh the importance of including any specific information about the existence of known or suspected HIV infection in the ordinary medical record, except when circumstances of medical necessity mandate it. At a minimum, the inclusion of any information related to HIV infection in the medical record should be discussed with the patient prior to its conclusion.
    b. Legal liability – Health officers and other institutional officers should remember that all confidential medical information is protected by statutes and that any authorized disclosure of it may create legal liability. The duty of physicians and or health care providers to protect the confidentiality of information is superseded by the necessity to protect others only in very specific life threatening circumstances. 
    c. “Need to know”– The number of people in the College who are aware of the existence and/or identity of students, faculty, or staff who have HIV infection should be kept to an absolute minimum of those who truly need to know, both to protect the confidentiality and privacy of the infected person and to avoid the generation of unnecessary fear and anxiety among others. 
    d. Public health reporting requirements – The Student Health Services must strictly observe public health reporting requirements to the local public health authorities.
    e. Secondary lists or records – Neither health officers nor administrators should keep lists or logs identifying individuals tested for antibodies to HIV or known to be HIV infected. The potential for compromise of confidential information far exceeds any conceivable benefit of such listings.

F. Safety Precautions: AIDS and HIV Infection
Purchase shall implement the safety guidelines as developed by the United States Public Health Service for the handling of the blood and body fluids of all persons, not just those previously known to have HIV infection. These “universal” precautions are necessary because many people with HIV infection are not identified in advance. The same procedures should thus be followed for handling the blood and body fluids of any student, faculty, or staff member. 

  1. Disinfection
    Surfaces contaminated by blood or body fluids can be successfully cleaned and disinfected with commercial disinfectant solution or with household bleach, freshly diluted in a 1:10 solution. 
  2. Health Care Providers 
    a. Public Health Service procedures – In order to prevent the accidental transmission of HIV in health care settings, the College Health Services will implement current recommendations from the Public Health Services and will monitor compliance with these procedures. The College will provide educational programs about HIV infection control procedures to all Health Services personnel. 
    b. Equipment – The College Health Services will use disposable, one-use needles and other equipment whenever such equipment will puncture the skin or mucous membranes of patients. The same safety precautions must be used with all patients. If disposable equipment is not available, any needles or other implements that puncture skin or mucous membranes must be stream sterilized by autoclave before re-use, or safely discarded. Extreme caution should be exercised by all handling equipment, particularly in disposal of needles. 
  3. Teaching Laboratories
    Academic faculty and staff will adopt the United States Public Health Service safety precautions for the handling of blood and body fluids of all persons in teaching laboratories. Laboratory courses requiring exposure to blood, such as biology courses in which blood is obtained by finger prick for typing examination will use disposable equipment, and no lancets or other blood-letting devices will be re-used or shared. No student should be required to obtain or process the blood of others. 
  4. Disposal
    Needles and other disposable equipment or supplies which puncture the skin or which contact blood or body fluids shall be discarded into appropriately marked containers following the recommendations of the United States Public Health Service. Such containers must be properly disposed of according to appropriate laws of the State of New York.

G. Educational Programs: AIDS and HIV Infection

  1. General Educational Programs
     Because there is as yet neither a vaccine to prevent HIV infection nor effective therapy   for persons infected with HIV, the primary response of any college to the epidemic of HIV infection must be education. Accordingly, Purchase shall develop and maintain a comprehensive educational program that increases awareness and provides information and skills to prevent the further spread of the virus.
    a. In the design of the format and content of the educational programs, it is important to recognize and address the rich diversity of people in the campus community and to provide opportunities for effective learning by people of any age, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.
    b.  A comprehensive program should be presented for students, faculty, and staff. It should address not only undergraduates, but also graduate and professional students; not only residential students, but also commuters and non-traditional students. Such a comprehensive program should be designed to reach all students at least once during their college career, preferably during their first days on campus during the orientation program.
    c. In order for the educational program to be effective, it must provide current information, use reliable up-to-date materials, and be both easily accessible and widely available. Direct, explicit, clear language should be used whenever possible, as appropriate for the audience.  
  2. Specific Educational Programs
    The college will provide general AIDS education, information about HIV transmission, and training in universal safety precautions to all employees who become exposed to blood and body fluids in the course of their employment.
Skateboarding, Skating, and Bicycling

The college recognizes that students, faculty, and staff use a variety of means of transportation on campus. Although personal choice is important, the college must consider the safety and well-being of the campus community and our visitors and college property.

In an effort to balance our concern for community safety and the ability to use these means of transportation, the college has issued the following policy regarding the use of bicycles, skates (including roller-skates and in-line skates),  and skateboards on campus.

  • All individuals using bicycles, skates, and skateboards are expected to use the equipment in a manner which is appropriate, considerate of safety of others and of college property outside of the main plaza. Individuals who use the equipment recklessly or without care of others’ safety and college property will be confronted, documented, and addressed through the college’s and/or state’s disciplinary systems.
  • Individuals are prohibited from  skating or skateboarding on the main plaza (aka: academic mall). In addition, individuals are prohibited from engaging in tricks (sliding, grinding, jumps, etc.) anywhere on college grounds which involve any college property (i.e., stairs, steps, railing, benches, entrances to buildings). Loitering or “sessioning” in these areas for the purpose of attempting tricks or stunts is strictly prohibited and will be confronted and dealt with through the college and/or state disciplinary systems.
  • Furthermore, the use of bicycles, skates, and skateboards inside of campus buildings, including the residence areas, is strictly prohibited. Bicycles must be stored in bike racks located throughout the campus and should not be brought into the buildings. Skateboards must be picked up and carried when within campus buildings. Skates must be removed before entering campus buildings.
  • The campus should be maintained as a safe and beautiful environment for everyone. Reckless behavior which endangers individuals and property should not be undertaken. It should be noted that the use of these items, in themselves, involves an assumption of personal risk. Persons who use them are personally liable for their actions.

Procedure for Enforcement

Bikers, skateboarders and skaters are subject to disciplinary action for failure to stop at the scene of an accident in which they have been involved that results in property damage and/or injury. Identification must be presented to the other party and the accident reported to the New York State University Police. The college will seek restitution if college property is damaged or destroyed.

University police officers are authorized to take temporary possession of bikes, skateboards or skates from users who act without caution or do not comply with this policy. Parents or guardians of offenders under the age of 17 must appear at the New York State University Police office to claim the bikes, skateboards, or skates.

Noncompliance

Purchase College students who violate this policy shall be referred to the Office of Community Standards for disciplinary action. The privilege to use bikes, skateboards, or skates may be revoked for up to one year for repeated offenses.  

For persons who are not Purchase College community members, the New York State University Police may determine that the offender be banned from riding in certain areas of the campus or on the entire campus for up to one year or longer should there be repeat offenses.

Policy Updated January 2017

Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct exist to create an atmosphere in which all students may feel secure in the constitutional and civil rights granted to them.

See the full Code of Conduct here.

Students with Disabilities

The college is in full compliance with the ADA and Section 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Any student who needs special accommodations because of a disability (i.e., mobility, sensory, psychiatric, or learning disability) must contact Lauren Rodriguez, director of the Office of Disability Resources, at (914) 251-6035 to arrange for accommodations. 

The Section 504 and ADA compliance officer for Purchase College is:
Jerima DeWese, Chief Diversity Officer
Tel. (914) 251-5992
Fax (914) 251-5977

Section 504 and ADA Disability Resources Coordinator for Purchase College Students is:
Lauren Rodriguez, PsyD
Director, Office of Disability Resources
Tel: (914) 251-6035
Fax: (914) 251-5934
Email: ODR@purchase.edu

Tobacco Free Policy

Purchase’s  Tobacco Free Policy

In recognition of the overwhelming scientific evidence that tobacco use causes serious diseases and is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States, Purchase College is instituting a Tobacco Free policy to change the culture of tobacco use on campus. This policy expands on the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the New York statewide smoking ban that took effect on July 24, 2003, which bans smoking in all enclosed workplaces in New York, including bars, restaurants and construction sites.  The policy will apply to any property owned, leased, or operated by the college. In line with the tobacco-free vision of New York held by SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher and Governor Andrew Cuomo, Purchase’s goal is to be completely tobacco-free by the end of the 2017–18 academic year.

Purchase College places a priority on the health and well-being of students, faculty, staff and those who visit the Purchase campus. The Tobacco Free policy will complement the college’s environmental sustainability efforts, help create and preserve equitable and respectful work, study, and living environments, and bring Purchase’s institutional investments in line with the college’s principles on social and environmental responsibility. It will also eliminate harmful exposure to secondhand smoke and prevent litter and chemical leaching from tobacco waste.

 

What Counts as “Tobacco”?

Under the policy, “tobacco” is defined as all tobacco and tobacco-derived products intended for human consumption, including, but not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, e-cigarettes, hookah-smoked products, clove cigarettes, bidis, kreteks, and smokeless tobacco (for example, dip, chew, snus, and snuff). It does not include any product that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for sale as a tobacco use-cessation product.

Because the liquid-nicotine mixture in e-cigarettes is derived from tobacco, it is defined by this policy as a tobacco product rather than as a tobacco-cessation product. While the secondhand effect of the vapor from e-cigarettes may be less harmful than that of tobacco smoke, Purchase is unwilling to expose students to possible harm from an unregulated and untested product. When the FDA makes a ruling on e-cigarettes, this policy will be reconsidered.

The Tobacco Free Committee

Purchase will maintain an ad hoc Tobacco Free Committee to help the campus make the transition from a culture of casual public tobacco use to one that promotes clean air and consideration for the health of others. This committee will oversee the creation of designated smoking areas to be used while the college is making the transition to becoming entirely tobacco free. It will also develop an outreach campaign for members of the community with nicotine dependency, offering help through flyers, posters, emails, information sessions, and support groups. The committee will educate the community about free cessation options, institutional resources, and potential student code of conduct violations so that the policy is clear.  It will coordinate an effort to engage the campus in an on-going dialog with the campus about tobacco. The Tobacco Free policy will be reviewed at least annually and will be revised as needed to ensure that its objectives are attained and that Purchase is in compliance with federal and state law. The committee will contain representatives from the faculty, staff, and student body.

How Will Tobacco Free Work on Campus?

The Tobacco Free policy will have two phases. During the initial phase (from present to June 2018), tobacco use will be strictly limited to designated smoking areas, which will be created around campus by the  the start of the fall semester of 2015. ( Note: Please see the attached smoking zone map) Smokers will be required to use specific receptacles for their litter. Information about Tobacco Free and cessation options will be clearly posted and disseminated around the campus. Smoking elsewhere on campus during this period will be a violation of campus policy. This rule will also apply when students attend college-sponsored off-campus events. By June 2018, tobacco use will not be permitted anywhere on college owned, leased or operated property.

Compliance

This policy is driven by respect for others and the environment and relies on the thoughtfulness, consideration, and cooperation of tobacco users and non-users for its success. The success of this policy will depend on the cooperation of all members of the Purchase College community, both to comply and encourage others to do so.  It is the responsibility of all members of the college community to abide by this tobacco policy. 

An initial violation of the policy will result in only a verbal warning. This warning will include information about the policy, the rationale behind it, and the availability of tobacco-cessation and harm-reduction support services on and off campus. Subsequent noncompliance by students will result in formal discipline under section E12 of the Community Standards of Conduct.

Helping our Community to Stop Using Tobacco

Purchase will make every reasonable effort to assist students, faculty and staff who wish to stop or reduce their use of tobacco products. It will promote awareness of evidence-based tobacco-cessation resources through a multifaceted outreach campaign. Students can find cessation and reduction tools and treatment, including counseling and nicotine-replacement therapy, at Student Health Services and the Wellness Center. Faculty and staff  can get help through the Employee Assistance Program and from their healthcare providers. The Tobacco Free Committee will regularly solicit feedback from the campus community to ensure that the needs of those interested in tobacco cessation are being met.

Advertising, Promotion, and Sales

Tobacco sales are prohibited on the campus. The college will not accept advertising, marketing, distribution, or promotion of tobacco products.

Sponsorships, Gifts, Funding, and Investments

All grants and gifts to Purchase and all solicitations and proposals for such funds must have the approval of the college and must conform to its mission statement and culture of wellness, SUNY policies, and all applicable laws and regulations. With that in mind, Purchase will no longer invest in any direct tobacco company holdings and will divest itself of any remaining investments in the tobacco industry as soon as it is reasonably able to do so. Investment packages that include tobacco-related holdings must be reported to the Tobacco Free Committee annually as long as such holdings remain in those packages.

Changing the Culture

Purchase will actively educate the campus community about the dangers of tobacco use. The Tobacco Free policy will be clearly posted in student handbooks, on the campus website, and in other publications. Freshman seminars will review it, and it will be shared with parents, alumni, and visitors through admissions publications, media, campus announcements, the college website, and other resources. Key components of the policy will be posted on signs around campus (e.g., “Purchase is moving toward being tobacco free”; “Limit tobacco use to designated areas only”). Public announcements will address the policy and its implementation at events on campus.

The Tobacco Free Committee will undertake education and outreach efforts intended to change the culture of the campus community to one that values clean air, mutual respect, and holistic well-being.

Use of Facilities by Third Parties for Free Speech

Summary:
The following constitutes Purchase College’s “time, place, and manner” policy on the use of Purchase College (the “college”)–owned facilities by third parties (not sponsored by the college or by recognized student organizations) for free speech purposes as adopted by the College Council pursuant to a delegation of authority by the SUNY Board of Trustees (see SUNY Policy no. 5603, Use of Facilities by Non-Commercial Organizations).

Reasons for this Policy: 
As an institution of higher education, the college respects and fully supports the rights granted to individuals under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution regarding free speech. As a public entity partially funded by NYS tax dollars, the college is required to designate a public forum for the use of third parties who are not members of the campus community for their exercise of free speech rights. Accordingly, the college will dedicate a portion of its already scarce resources to making such a forum available. These resources include staff time for the management of the designated public forum, the loss of revenue associated with providing the space free of charge, and the cost of providing New York State University Police, where necessary, to provide for the public safety of participants.

In adopting this policy, the college carefully weighed many conflicting  considerations. On the one hand, the college is legally required to provide a designated public forum for free speech by third parties. On the other hand, the college is required to prudently manage NYS property under its jurisdiction; to meet its obligations for the orderly and safe operation of the campus; and to responsibly manage and allocate scarce state resources in pursuit of the college’s educational mission.

Policy Application:
This policy shall apply to all third parties who are not sponsored by the college and/or a student group, who want to use the college’s designated public forum for free speech purposes. This policy does not apply to students or to speakers officially sponsored by recognized student groups, faculty, or staff as other reservation and use policies apply to those campus community members.

Definitions:
Black-out days: The college has “blacked out” certain days on its calendar on which the use of the campus and its facilities, including outdoor spaces, are reserved exclusively for campus-related activities that are at the very core of its primary educational mission. During these blackout periods, no third party shall be allowed to use the designated public forum for free speech purposes. The college defines the black-out periods to include the following:

  1. During the Opening Weekend for the commencement of fall and spring semesters;
  2. During reading periods and examination periods as set forth on the then current academic calendar;
  3. During graduation-related activities and events, including winter and spring commencements;
  4. During major fall or spring campus-wide celebrations, such as concerts, Homecoming, and Culture Shock; and
  5. During the conservation shutdown of educational buildings and administrative offices as defined on its calendar when the temperature of the offices shall be below 60 degrees Fahrenheit (typically between the end of the examination period when students leave campus for the winter holiday break and a few business days after the first of the new year). This time frame is included in the black-out period because administrative offices are typically closed for the receipt of applications and the campus is virtually vacant to conserve energy and to save money to meet state budget reductions.

Designated Public Forums: The college identifies the following area as its designated public forum: the outside area of the Great Lawn bounded to the south by Crossroads dorm and to the north by the Olde Apartments, to the west by the Student Services Building and t the east by the Gym Building. Attached hereto and made a part hereof is a map outlining the designated public forum.

The college selected this outdoor space for its designated public forum area because it is a heavily trafficked pedestrian areaThe use of this space is also not likely to interfere with classroom instruction, dormitory residences, or the operation of administrative offices.

The college president shall have the authority to change, either permanently or temporarily, the identity of the designated public forum to another area of the college campus to address concerns for the health, safety, welfare, and o operation of the campus community.

Third Party: a person(s) who wants to use the designated public forum for free speech purposes and the person(s) is not a student, faculty member, or staff member at the college, and the person(s) is not officially sponsored by either the college and/or a recognized student group to speak at the college.

Policy:
The college is providing a designated public forum for use by third parties for their free speech purposes.

Reservation and Record-Keeping of the Use of Space:

Third parties who seek to use the designated public forum must:

  1. Complete a designated public forum application*; and
  2. File the application with the Rental Office at least three (3) business days before the date the applicant wants to use the designated public forum (applications received after 3pm on a given business day shall be considered as having been received on the morning of the next business day). The applicant assumes responsibility for proper delivery to the Rental Office in a timely manner. The Office is open 8:30 to 5pm, Monday through Friday, for deliveries, except for holidays and certain college black-out days as noted below.

The college shall review the application and respond to the application in a timely manner.

  1. If the application is completed and signed by the applicant, and the desired date and time is available for use, the University shall inform the applicant of its approval to use the designated forum on the date and time so requested. 
  2. If the application is not complete and/or not signed, the college shall return the application to the applicant for completion. The time period of three (3) business days will begin running again once the completed and signed application is received by the Rental Office. 
  3. If the space is already reserved to its capacity for the date and time requested, or if the date and time requested is during a “black-out period” as defined below, the college shall inform the applicant of the same and offer the applicant the next available date and time for the use of the space.

The college shall not:

  1. Inquire as to the nature or content of the free speech;
  2. Charge the applicant an application fee to reserve the designated public forum;
  3. Charge the applicant/third party for the use of the space;
  4. Impose insurance requirements on the applicant; or
  5. Charge the applicant for any additional costs to the college that the college may incur due to the use of the space by the applicant/third party, such as security.

The applicant shall:

  1. Be responsible for any costs for parking on the campus as all students, faculty staff, and visitors are charged for parking;
  2. Be responsible for picking up from the designated public forum any brochures, pamphlets, leaflets, or other handouts or goods that the third-party speaker brought with him/her to disseminate during his/her speech, and properly disposing of the same in public garbage receptacles or taking them with him/her;
  3. The college has a regulation against littering on the campus that applies to all students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Failure to comply with this provision may result in future denial of use of the designated public forum; and
  4. Not use megaphone equipment for the amplification of the speech. Failure to comply with this provision may result in immediate termination of the designated public forum and result in future denial of use.

The college reserves the right to terminate any use of the designated public forum in the event either the speaker or a member(s) of the audience engages in conduct that violates the SUNY Rules for the Maintenance of Public Order, adopted in accordance with Education Law Section 6430 and 8 NYCRR 535, in order to secure the orderly and operation of the campus for the safety of the entire campus.

*Applications to use the designated public forum can be obtained by contacting:

Keisha L. Martin
914-251-6505 or email her at keisha.martin@purchase.edu

All applications must be reviewed and approved. 

Revised October 2015

Working with Community Treatment Providers

The college will collaborate with community physical health, mental health, and substance treatment providers to determine the appropriate level of campus support for students.  However, due to the sensitive nature of the issues likely to be raised by such providers, and the state and federal privacy laws which protect such information, only appropriate staff from the following offices may interact with community treatment providers:

  • Counseling Center (914) 251-6390
  • Health Services (914) 251-6380
  • Disability Resources (914) 251-6035
  • Wellness Center (914) 251-6665

Any other college employee receiving phone calls, emails, information or information requests, forms, letters, etc. must forward such communication to the appropriate office listed above without engaging in discussion with the treatment provider

As a reminder, health-related information should not be forwarded using email, as it is not a secure method of communication.