For courses offered in the upcoming and current semester: You can sort all courses offered by session, subject, instructor, and more in the myHeliotrope online course search

Below is a partial list of courses that have been approved for liberal studies depth areas (e.g., humanities, natural sciences, social sciences). In addition to the following courses, liberal studies students have access to courses offered by the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the School of the Arts in the fall and spring semesters. Many courses in other areas also fulfill depth or general education requirements.

American Sign Language

ASL 1000: American Sign Language I

A comprehensive introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), beginning with a focus on the linguistic aspects of ASL, including syntax, facial expression, vocabulary, and the manual alphabet. Students progress to conversational signing and finger spelling and develop an ability to communicate on a beginning level.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ASL 1100: American Sign Language II

In this continuation of American Sign Language I, emphasis is placed on conversational signing, syntax, and facial expression. Students are introduced to classifiers and directional verbs, and develop an ability to communicate on an intermediate level.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ASL1000

Department: Liberal Studies

Anthropology

ANT 3140: Women Cross-Culturally

An examination of some of the theoretical literature about gender and the debates concerning the position of women cross-culturally in both “simple” and complex societies.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ANT 3330: Middle Eastern Cultures: Texts and Films

Explores the various cultures, geography, and history of the Middle East, including Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Some time is also devoted to minorities within a larger context. The selected texts and films raise awareness of human rights issues as well as the political, ethnic, and national complexities of the region. Both fiction and nonfiction works are used.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Biology

BIO 1600: The Search for Life in the Universe

Explore the nature of life, examine the history of life on Earth, look for life among the rocky planets and icy moons of our solar system, hunt for extrasolar planets, and join in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Are we alone in the universe?

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
BIO 1750: Can Cancer Be Prevented?

A study of cancer and possible cancer prevention strategies with a focus on modern scientific inquiry. Topics include the scientific method, analysis, and critical thinking; critical reading of various sources of scientific information; and the cellular properties, oncogenes, metastasis, causes, and prevention of cancer.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Business

BUS 1500: Basic Principles of Accounting

An introduction to transactions analysis and the preparation of financial statements, with particular emphasis on external reporting. The course is divided into two parts: the preparation of financial statements; and the analysis of corporate operations, based on financial accounting statements. Purchase College undergraduates cannot take this course for liberal arts credit.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
BUS 1600: The Internet and Business

Students examine the impact of the internet on business and develop a solid foundation for evaluating current and future internet business applications. Topics include internet businesses; the impact of the internet on traditional businesses, including internet marketing, customer relationship management, and virtual workplaces; information businesses (music, software, movies, news); and global issues (outsourcing, offshoring).

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
BUS 3000: Organizational Leadership

Effective, vibrant leadership is essential to the success of any organization. This interdisciplinary course is designed to increase students’ understanding of major leadership behavioral patterns, personal leadership skills, and analysis in for-profit, nonprofit, community, and governmental organizations. Contemporary issues in leadership are addressed in the context of established leadership theory.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
BUS 3090: Business Ethics

Students learn how to integrate ethics with business practices by examining case studies and theories. Confronting ethical dilemmas in the workplace is an experience that affects individuals, organizations, communities, and the environment. Civic- and social-responsibility practices and policies are examined, demonstrating how integrity and moral sensibility can be a part of everyday professional and civic decision-making.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Capstone (for Majors Only)

CAP 3880: Junior Seminar

After examining an interdisciplinary legal problem from multiple perspectives, students conduct in-depth literature reviews as well as plan and write field-based research proposals within a specific area of interest. The goal is to recognize and skillfully demonstrate the difference between disciplinary depth and broad interdisciplinary connections to prepare for the senior capstone.

Credits: 2

Department: Liberal Studies
CAP 4800: Senior Capstone

One-semester project that involves empirical research, library investigation, or an on or off-campus applied learning experience. Regardless of the format, the project will culminate in a significant paper. Course sections are overseen by faculty within each concentration to foster integration of prior coursework, and should be selected in consultation with academic advisors. Required for all liberal studies students.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: WRI1110 Or LWR1110 Or WRI2110

Department: Liberal Studies

Environmental Studies

ENV 1600: World of Weather: Introduction to Meteorology and Global Weather Patterns

An introduction to the basic concepts of meteorology: radiation budget, weather elements, atmospheric stability, general circulation, frontal systems, surface and upper-air weather maps, and the basics of weather forecasting. Students are also introduced to modern weather-display systems using audiovisual support (e.g., computer-generated graphics and internet weather services).

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ENV 3180: Politics of Green

Political ecology is an interdisciplinary discipline that connects politics and economy to problems of environmental control and ecological change. This course examine the essentials of political ecology: its history and emergence, its conceptual and methodological challenges, major questions that it has answered to varying degrees, and major challenges that face the field now and in the future.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

History

HIS 1450: History-on-Hudson: History of the Hudson Valley Region

Dive into a more than 400-year study of “America’s First Great River.” Discover why, where, and how the Hudson River region has had—and continues to have—a vital role in shaping American history and society. The region’s history is examined through a selection of such themes as culture, exploration, art, literature, economics, industry, transportation, international relations, and the environment.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 2260: Popular Music in America: Evolution and Revolution

The invention of sound recording in the late 1800s caused profound aesthetic transformations in music. This course surveys the many styles that have swept through American music—from parlor songs, ragtime, blues, and brass band through R&B, top 40, heavy metal, rap, and hip-hop—and discusses the roles of rural and urban musical centers. Using the last 125 years of technological innovation in recording, students analyze the more significant cultural changes that continue to reverberate throughout American society.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3130: American History and Society Through Music

A narrative survey of U.S. history from the colonial period to the present through an exploration of its musical history. The course investigates America’s fundamental principles of politics, its primary social issues, and its wealth of aesthetic musical initiatives. Students examine the unity, diversity, originality, and adaptability of significant political, social, and musical institutions.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3150: The Mediterranean Origins of Western Culture

Examines the main historical events in the Mediterranean area from late antiquity through the Renaissance. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam were born here, and the diverse peoples and cultures around its shores competed for intellectual and political dominance. These interactions resulted in the legacy of beliefs and institutions at the core of Western culture, including some issues still unresolved today.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3415: The Americas Before 1492

An exploration of Native American life before 1492, using books, documentaries, and films. Topics include the rise and fall of native cultures in the Americas, commerce, politics, economics, agriculture, and urbanization. The focus is on institutions, values, and interrelationships among people across the Americas, and the accomplishments and influences of individual civilizations on the history of the Americas.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3535: The Blue and the Gray: U.S. Civil War

The Civil War was arguably the most controversial and traumatic event in American history. This course considers how and why the war developed, its long-term results, and why it is such an important part of America’s cultural heritage. Through an examination of novels, films, diaries, and letters written by Civil War participants, students analyze the impact of this war and our continuing fascination with it.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3545: The Militarization of American Society

The influence of warfare is arguably the least understood aspect of human history; too often, war is considered like a sporting event—teams, winners, and losers. Students critically examine the effects of warfare on U.S. history in the 20th century. Topics include how militarization and “modern” warfare influence American society and shape its history.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3615: African History

This study of African history addresses the continent’s geography and how it has affected Africa’s place in history, the rise and fall of civilizations, Islamic/Arab influences, European colonization, independence movements, and current challenges. In particular, students examine the slave trade and its effects on African societies, colonial domination, and the rise of nationalist movements.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3650: The American West 1789–1914

Explores the influence of the expanding West on the culture, politics, and society of the United States. Topics include the California Gold Rush, the significance of the Northwest Land Ordinances, the Louisiana Purchase, the Mexican Cession, and the Oklahoma Land Rush. Students consider the influence of the “Wild West” on the American character and explore racial and gender stereotyping in American literature. In addition to readings, traditional Hollywood “westerns” are compared with more modern portrayals of the West.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
HIS 3856: Oral History Interviewing

Students learn how to document community members’ traditions, memories, and stories through audio and video recording to create permanent records that contribute to understanding the past. By using a critical approach, students learn how to uphold professional and technical standards in order to capture, preserve, and make oral history narratives available in different forms for current and future use.

Credits: 2

Department: Liberal Studies

Journalism

JOU 3280: Media Literacy

Media literacy encompasses the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and create media. In this course, students learn to critically examine visual, audio, and online media while gaining an understanding of the media’s effect on culture and society.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Liberal Studies

LBS 3010: Transportation

An interdisciplinary course that examines the way air, ground, and marine transportation is structured and used to move demographically diverse people. Discussions about the role of public participation in planning efforts includes particular attention to youth, minority populations, and people with low income. Programs to increase participation from people traditionally under-heard in planning processes are examined and proposed.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LBS 3011: Health

The modern conception of health and its resulting issues are examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include the origins of emerging health and related public policy issues; the impact on the local, national, and global economy and educational systems; national security; preventive efforts; and approaches to planning policy that address these health challenges now and in the future.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LBS 3012: Water

An interdisciplinary course that examines physical aspects of the world’s water, from oceans and rivers to streams and ponds. Noting the role that water plays in ecosystems and social systems provides the basis for further exploration into the history of use, contamination, and protection. The physical and chemical properties of water provide the basis for questions of safety and sustainability.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LBS 3013: Food

Food preferences differ culture by culture. This interdisciplinary course explores practices and politics of food production, consumption, and regulation locally and globally. After taking a historic look at how food practices have changed, students examine microbial and chemical agents that may contaminate food supplies and learn practical considerations for preventing food scarcity and contamination on small and large scales.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LBS 3014: Fundamentalism

Contemporary culture cannot be adequately understood without considering the impact of religious extremism. While other factors play a role, it is religious passions that fuel the jihadist movement in the Islamic world, incite violence in the occupied Palestinian territories, and amplify culture wars between secular and religious forces in the U.S. This course examines the root causes of such cultural phenomena, asking whether fundamentalism can exist in modern society without leading to bloodshed.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Literature

LIT 3085: Literature of the American West

No American geographical fact is more significant than the West less a place than an idea, an imaginative provocation. Many American writers have been provoked to represent the West, and students read from among their work, including such writers as Raymond Chandler, Sandra Cisneros, Jack London, Nathanael West, Walter Van Tilburg Clark, Willa Cather, and many poets.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3295: Dark Fairy Tales

To modern audiences, “fairy tale” suggests beautiful princesses and handsome princes, ball gowns, and singing mice, but fairy tales have much darker roots. Alongside true love, innocence, and bravery lies infanticide, incest, murder, and cannibalism. In this course, students study a selection of fairy tales and explore their origins, variants, interpretations, and the archetypal characters who inhabit them.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3352: Love in Literature

From Adam and Eve to the present, numerous authors have written about love. In this course, students examine forms and expressions of both romantic and erotic love in Western literature, from the Bible and ancient Greeks to Bob Dylan. Writers studied include Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Nabokov, in addition to love poems, recent American short stories, and more.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3400: Short Fiction

An examination of the “middle genre,” encompassing the novella and the short novel. Readings provide ample opportunity to sample works embodying the intensity of short fiction and some of the expanded characterization and plot development of the novel. Readings include works by several significant 19th- and 20th-century authors from many countries.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3427: 20th-Century World Literature

Students consider world literature of the 20th century as it reflects and questions national and international boundaries, politics, religion, freedom, nationalism, sexuality, gender, and identity. Readings include a broad cross-section of contemporary writings by international authors to facilitate discussion of social norms and values and the diversity of global literary tradition.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3571: Holocaust Memoir and Diary

Holocaust scholar Lawrence Langer asks, "To whom shall we entrust the custody of the public memory of the Holocaust?" This course examines eyewitness testimony produced either during or after the Holocaust. Students read works such authors as Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, Kazik (Simha Rotem), Emanuel Ringelblum, Anne Frank, and Hanna Senesh, a true Jewish Joan of Arc.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3636: Modern American Poetry

Modern and contemporary American poetry is studied with an emphasis on craft and the creative process. Poets include T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Robert Frost, and Sylvia Plath, among others. Attention is given to the imagery, structure, and sound patterns (or “music”) of the poems. Poetry writers are encouraged to enroll, and anyone interested in poetry is welcome.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LIT 3677: Modern American Short Stories

Concise and focused, the short story has been a lens through which Americans have explored their identities. Stories written in the last 25 years examine the changing sense of what being an American means.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Mathematics

MAT 1001: Using Excel in the Workplace

Students learn how to employ Excel to create and modify spreadsheets, create macros and scripts, create charts and graphs, import data, create concept maps and sequentially rank information. By learning how to harness Excel’s data analysis and visualization tools, they can analyze information, spot trends, and access information easily and recognize its importance in making critical financial decisions.

Credits: 2

Department: Liberal Studies
MAT 1600: Introductory Statistics

Statistics are used everywhere in the modern world. This course covers descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, methods of dispersion, and graphs; and inferential statistics, including normal distributions and hypothesis testing, Pearson correlation, and linear regression.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Music

MUS 1550: Fundamentals of Music

Explores the elements of music, including melody, rhythm, harmony, tone color, texture, and structure. Students acquire basic literacy in music notation and score analysis while being guided through an in-depth listening experience of representative works spanning the history of Western classical, folk, and popular music. Experience in reading music is not required.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
MUS 3470: American Music: A Cultural History

Using an interdisciplinary approach, students analyze the social and historical effects of American music, from the music of Native Americans and the early Europeans in America to gospel, blues, jazz, rhythm and blues, rock ’n’ roll, rap, hip-hop, and beyond. The evolution and convergence of musical genres and forms are also examined, along with the artists, their aesthetics and audiences, and the evolving history of American culture.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Psychology

PSY 1700: Introduction to the Brain and Behavior

An overview of the exciting field of behavioral neuroscience. The four content areas are basic neural processing and neuroanatomy; imaging the brain; the thinking, feeling, remembering, and learning brain; and the ethical brain. In addition, the ways in which brain-behavior relationships are portrayed in the popular media are discussed.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3110: Forensic Psychology

Students hone critical thinking and evaluative skills in examining data, evidence, and assumptions underlying the judicial process and the application of psychological principles. The research and clinical practice of forensic psychology in both civil and criminal law-enforcement settings are studied. The training, roles, and responsibilities of forensic psychologists along with methods of interrogation, criminal profiling, and investigation are also examined.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3125: Adult Development

Focusing on the longest phase of the life cycle, adulthood, this course examines the developmental processes from the transition to adulthood through old age. Students explore current theories regarding development and examine current research on adults’ capabilities and changes over time, adaptive responses to continuous changes in life, and reciprocal influences of the environment and development.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3140: Religion and Psychology

In this study of psychology in relation to religion, students explore the definition of religion, its personal meaning to people, and its social and political meaning in the community. The importance of ritual is discussed, and conversion is examined to understand its meaning. The middle of the course focuses on such theorists as Freud, Jung, and Maslow and the role religion played in their theories. Finally, the role religion and culture play in psychotherapy and the difference between religions and cults are examined.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3150: Educational Psychology

Psychological themes, together with cognitive and social-emotional development, are studied in the context of the education environment. Emphasis is on the role of emotional climate in the classroom and its overall relationship to learning. Student variability (e.g., attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders) is evaluated. Sociological and legal issues pertinent to today's classroom are also examined.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3245: Psychology and the Media

The media profoundly affect how humans understand themselves and the world in which they live, and their cognition, emotion, socialization, and behavior. Students examine the application of psychological principles throughout several forms of media, including news, advertising, educational and public information, social media, and entertainment. Implications for consumers, educators, children, parents, and individuals are also considered.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3260: Multiple Intelligences

The theory of multiple intelligences suggests that there are several distinct forms of intelligence. This course examines the initial interest in interspecies differences, followed by a critical look at the use of intelligence tests as classification tools and predictors of academic success. Students explore different forms of intelligence and ways of teaching children, and work with schoolchildren to study one form of intelligence.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3315: The Psychology of Aging

Based on changes occurring throughout life-span developmental psychology, this course evaluates what is myth, stereotype, potential, and reality about old age. Students examine the theoretical and empirical developments in such areas as psychosocial functioning, including identity and personality development; cultural norms and expectations, including role and status changes; physical and intellectual change; death and dying; and health nutrition.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3350: Developmental Psychology

A study of human development from infancy through childhood, with particular emphasis on social interaction, cognition, language, play, and representational activity.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3365: Advanced Psychology of Communication

This course focuses on understanding communication in relationships (interpersonal) and within the mind (intrapsychic: thinking, alone time, analyzing, understanding the external world and how one communicates internally). Topics include communication styles and communication in the intimate relationship, within the family, and at the workplace.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3367: Communication Through Art Therapy

Art therapy offers patients with progressive and chronic illnesses a means to communicate through artwork when language or other avenues of communication are unavailable. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of art therapy. Lectures, readings, PowerPoint presentations, and experiential projects provide students with an understanding of how to analyze and interpret artwork produced by patients.

Credits: 2

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3690: Personality Assessment

Focuses on how personality measures are constructed and how scores on these measures are interpreted and used. The strengths and weaknesses of various projective tests, personality inventories, single-trait measures, IQ tests, behavioral indicators, and physiological measures are reviewed. Topics include the stability of personality, whether or not IQ tests actually measure intelligence, and the accuracy of people’s self-descriptions of their personalities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSY1530 Or BPS1530

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3720: Child Psychopathology

Addresses early and profound deviations in infancy, childhood schizophrenia, and organic disturbances, as well as the theoretical work of Stern and Mahler on the concept of self. Other topics include depression and the consequences of loss, pathologies of initiative and early socialization, neurotic process and issues of excessive/inadequate control, mental retardation, neglect and abuse, and developmental issues around cultural/ethnic differences.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3730: Counseling and Psychotherapy

A study of the basic theories and their applications in counseling and psychotherapy. Theories studied include behavior therapy; drug therapy; interpersonal psychotherapy; psychoanalysis; and group, art, movement, and the “newer” therapies. Variations on the above as applied to different clinical populations are emphasized, as are issues of research and ethics in counseling and psychotherapeutic practice.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PSY 3760: Psychology of Personality

Personality psychologists study consistent ways people think, feel, and behave. This course focuses on classic and contemporary theoretical approaches to personality and how theory influences the research questions psychologists ask, the methods they employ, and their interpretation of results. An examination of research findings furthers understanding of commonalities as well as individual differences in people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSY1530 Or BPS1530

Department: Liberal Studies

Religious Studies

REL 3200: Gods, Goddesses, and Demons

An examination of the psychology and spiritual significance of mythopoetic images and the theme of human crisis, individual and communal, in selected epic poems and spectacles from ancient Greek, Indo-Tibetan, and contemporary cultures.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
REL 3250: World Religions: An Anatomy of the Sacred

“God is dead,” Nietzsche famously proclaimed to signal the waning power of religion. In spite of the influence religion exerts, one is reminded of the lack of understanding of the world’s major faiths. This course is a study of the origins, evolution, and the traditions of the major and minor religions of the world.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
REL 3310: Cultural Survival and Environmental Action

Exploring indigenous cultures of North America, Central Asia, Africa, and Australia, this course examines the challenges faced by native traditions. Topics range from the forces of colonialism to globalization, which have an impact on a sense of place and ecology. This context provides the background and leads to implications for environmental action.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
REL 3350: Healing and the Arts: Indo-Tibetan Traditions

Indian and Tibetan traditional arts evolved from ancient techniques for rebalancing natural energies through aesthetic experience and awareness. Students explore these traditional musical, visual, literary, theatrical, and ritual arts and the meditative philosophies behind them. The course also observes techniques of current practitioners and relates them to practices cultivated by traditional healers for living in harmony with nature and attuning to the elemental energies of life.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
REL 3410: Environmental Sustainability and Spirituality

An examination of the writings, actions, and spiritual traditions of nature activists in the context of global climate change, food sustainability, and other environmental issues. Students explore the question, “How do people’s values affect their thinking about nature and their actions in the natural world?”

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
REL 3450: Buddhist Ideas and Practice

Investigates practical Indian, Tibetan, and Zen teachings and their relationship to meditative practice, somatic awareness, ethical engagement, and personal and collective well-being. Students evaluate how people learn, know, and do what is good, i.e., that which promotes individual and collective health and happiness. The effects and applications of these practices and teachings are also explored.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Sociology

SOC 3315: Contemporary Popular Culture

Combines readings, viewings, and discussion of various forms of contemporary culture since the mid-1960s, such as popular films and music, design and fashion, architecture, magazines, art, television, and the new imaging technologies. Topics include avant-garde, popular, and mass culture; high and low aesthetics; stereotypes; cultural hierarchy; identity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity; and American concepts of age and class.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
SOC 3355: Sociology of the Five Senses

Using a variety of sensory mediums—such as radio (sound), movies and photography (sight), sculpture (touch), and cooking (taste, smell)—this course explores different sensory cultures (blind and deaf), their social meanings, and social movements; the evolution of medical terminology; media representations such as sign language and Braille by, for, and about these cultures; and how they have changed since the early 1900s.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
SOC 3415: Racial Inequalities

Given the ethnic complexity of society, major social institutions—including education, criminal justice, health care, social services, and business—face many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and future of race and ethnicity in American society, and how immigration, culture, religion, education, and income play parts in prejudice, discrimination, and racial inequalities.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
SOC 3485: Crime and Delinquency

Crime and delinquency are analyzed as social phenomena, and their relationship to various social institutions is examined. Students are also given an overview of the theories of crime causation, as well as the nature and role of the police, courts, and prisons in society.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
SOC 3555: Sexual Assault: The Courts and Society Today

Students examine the different types of sexual assault; the effects on victims, their families, and society; and the legal process unique to sexual assault prosecutions. Topics include legal protection for special victims; motivation of criminals; date rape, domestic violence, and battered women’s syndrome; and crimes against children. The roles of investigators, doctors, forensic scientists, district attorneys, judges, experts, and psychological counselors are also analyzed.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
SOC 3575: Studies in Victimology

Focuses on the central character in a criminal act—the victim. Objectives include understanding victimization and learning how to offer a victim real help. Diverse reactions are analyzed and various forms of practical help are examined. Special attention is given to such crimes as sexual assault and the various categories of abuse (child, adolescent, elder, parental, and spousal), and to the survivors of homicide victims.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Theatre and Performance

THP 3160: America’s Theatre of Protest

Examines the means by which leading, contemporary American playwrights have tackled many burning social issues, including racial discrimination, gender bias, corporate abuse, and violence against gays and lesbians. Kushner’s Angels in America is used as a model for discussion of several important writers whose dramas have had an impact on American culture and effected change.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
THP 3240: 20th-Century World Drama

Explores 20th-century world drama from an end-of-the-millennium perspective. Plays are chosen from North America, Africa, Asia, and Europe for cross-cultural thematic investigations. Close reading of the plays, along with class discussions, encourages students to theorize on the inter- and intra-textual nuances dramatized in the plays. The emphasis is on students’ response to the works, although they are expected to become familiar with various postmodernist theories, including feminist and postcolonial studies.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
THP 3255: Musicals: Stage, Screen, and Beyond

Musicals are used as the focus for comparing works of art. Broadway musicals are often based on movies, and vice versa—and both draw from literature. They also generate multiple adaptations, recordings, and broadcasts. Topics include the relationship of theatre and film, use of song and dance, and how similar ideas and stories are handled in different media and eras.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
THP 3340: The Great Broadway Songwriters

Come taste the finest sampling of the great Broadway songwriters. Each class examines a particular songwriter (Cole Porter, Stephen Sondheim), idea (the subversives: Weill and Bernstein), or era (contemporary voices on Broadway). Students savor recordings, investigate the dramatic qualities of the songs, and analyze lyrics, melody, and song form.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
THP 4200: Approaches to Shakespeare

Explores the variety of ways in which readers, critics, actors, and directors have interpreted, and can interpret, Shakespeare's plays and poetry. While written work and some research are required, there are also opportunities for oral presentations and performance.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies

Writing

WRI 1500: Creative Writer's Block/Unblock

Students develop strategies for overcoming creative writer’s block. Through a series of physical exercises, visualizations, and writing prompts, students learn to overcome obstacles that prevent them from writing or completing a written work. By building a toolkit of simple tactics, students learn how to become more productive creative writers.

Credits: 2

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 2150: Fiction Writing Workshop

A workshop for beginning writers, with an emphasis on finding story ideas, beginning and ending narratives, creating plot and conflict, developing characters, controlling voice and point of view, and handling narration. Students read, discuss, and revise their work regularly. Individual requirements are developed with the instructor, who reviews and evaluates each writer’s work.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 2160: Creative Writing Workshop

This course in creative writing allows students to explore various genres, including poetry, the short story, and the memoir. Students should be prepared to write, revise, and share portions of their work with the class and to read a selection of works by contemporary authors.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 2170: Poetry Writing Workshop

Focusing on the process of writing poetry, this course facilitates writing new work and sharpening revision skills. Students read contemporary poetry, participate in writing exercises, explore the writer’s craft, critique poems, and discuss the road to publication.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 3150: Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop

For fiction writers with some experience. Students read and discuss their work regularly and revise their stories. Specific requirements are developed with the instructor, but writers normally work on at least two stories during the term or on a longer project (a novella or novel). The instructor periodically reviews and evaluates each writer’s work.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 3160: Creative Writing Workshop (Advanced)

This course in creative writing allows students to explore various genres, including poetry, the short story, and the memoir. Students should be prepared to write, revise, and share portions of their work with the class and to read a selection of works by contemporary authors.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: WRI2160 Or CWR1010 Or AWR2120

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 3170: Poetry Writing Workshop (Advanced)

Focusing on the process of writing poetry, this course facilitates writing new work and sharpening revision skills. Students read contemporary poetry, participate in writing exercises, explore the writer’s craft, critique poems, and discuss the road to publication.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: WRI2170

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 3250: True Stories: The Craft of Memoir

Students learn how to examine and write their own stories through in-class exercises and discussion of both student and published work. Beginning writers, as well as those with a particular project in mind, learn how to place their stories in the larger context of the world and employ storytelling techniques, including imagery, voice, dialogue, and character development.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
WRI 3260: Creative Nonfiction

Students examine how experience, research, and imagination are integrated in this evolving genre. Discussions focus on traditional published works and those that play with the boundaries of the nonfiction, integrating traditional styles to create new ones. Students analyze one another’s attempts to artfully place the subjective in the context of the larger world and create their own original works.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies