You can sort all courses offered by session, subject, instructor, and more in the myHeliotrope online course search.

COM 1400: Introduction to Video Techniques and Technology

This introduction to the art and science of video production focuses on developing visual literacy and postproduction skills. Starting with an examination of basic video technology and traditional media aesthetics, all stages of the video production process are covered. Students receive introductory technical training and hands-on experience with digital camcorders, microphones, and nonlinear editing equipment.

Credits: 3

Department: Communication
COM 1500: Introduction to Communication

The history and impact of communication technologies are examined, beginning with speech and moving forward through print and digital media, advertising and public relations, media regulation and potential, and ending with a consideration of the future.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 2000: Spoken Word

The art of the spoken word is studied in many of its forms, including political speeches, story-based podcasts, and slam poetry. Students research and create concise stories; examine the role that rhythm, cadence, structure, and sound patterns play in creating a memorable performance; and then practice delivering the message for their intended audience. Uses and impacts for inspiring, informing, and persuading are considered.

Credits: 2

Department: Communication
COM 2005: Public Speaking

Students develop expertise in public speaking by preparing and presenting different types of speeches for a variety of purposes. The focus is on the main elements of planning and delivering a speech: the message, the speaker, the audience, and the occasion. All speeches are critiqued in class. As an integral part of the course, students learn PowerPoint.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 2030: Going Global: Intercultural Communication

Introduces basic concepts of intercultural communication. By examining communication practices in diverse contexts (e.g., family, education, workplace, health and recreation), students learn how cultural rules and norms are enacted and how violations are sanctioned. International factors, cross-cultural competence, and global citizenship are discussed with the goal of increasing understanding, enhancing each student’s ability to interact appropriately in the U.S. and abroad.

Credits: 2

Department: Communication
COM 2050: Introduction to Media Writing

In this writing intensive course, students build foundational skills in writing for a variety of media and purposes: print, digital, and broadcast media, public relations and advertising. Students begin to explore the divergent applications of written communication by analyzing their roles as both consumers of and writers for media. Ethical and legal issues are also introduced.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3020: Law, Ethics, and the Media

The First Amendment allows the mass media certain freedoms to publish, broadcast, advertise, and promote. Yet with those rights come responsibilities. This course examines the legal and ethical dimensions and issues involved with contemporary American mass media.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3040: Mass Media: A Cultural History

An interdisciplinary (social science and humanities) course that emphasizes critical thinking in understanding the social and historical effects of mass media in the U.S. and throughout the world. This course begins in 19th-century America, when print media shaped and defined the national culture, and concludes in the current century with the mass-media convergence of print, electronic, and digital multimedia that is shaping and defining our global culture.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3100: Communication Research

Students become acquainted with methods that communication practitioners use to conduct different types of research. Goals include learning to identify, understand, and evaluate diverse research strategies; distinguish between qualitative and quantitative methods, the types of knowledge they produce (big/small data), and the strengths and the weaknesses of each; and think critically about objectivity, researcher standpoint, and research ethics.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3110: Strategic Message Design

What are the different forms messages take in spoken and written communication? After examining actual messages in different contexts and assessing their impact on individuals and groups, students learn how to craft messages and select the appropriate timing, style, and medium for delivery. Participants have the opportunity to design, deliver, and test the impact of new messages.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3120: Negotiation Skills

Negotiation is approached from a communication perspective in this course. Students explore the cooperative decision-making process in which individuals and groups work together to attempt to achieve goals that may initially seem divergent. By examining the way language is used to frame arguments and barriers, students practice planning, reframing, and bargaining to maintain roles and relationships.

Credits: 2

Department: Communication
COM 3130: Public Communication Campaigns

Students learn how to inform and influence large audiences about noncommercial issues through a series of purposeful communication activities. By examining cases in environment, health, human and animal welfare, and disaster prevention, participants differentiate successful from unsuccessful campaigns and review the process for crafting appropriate mediated messages and selecting specific channels to produce a desired impact.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3165: American Film, Reflections of a Century I: 1900 to 1949

Early films depict the transition from the Victorian era to the Industrial Age, the birth of big cities, the suffragette movement, and the development of narrative cinema. Topics include World War I and the introduction of the propaganda film, the wild Jazz Age, the cynical gangster movies, the protest films of the Depression era, and the rise of escapist films.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3170: American Film, Reflections of a Century II: 1950 to 1999

Defining trends in U.S. cultural history between 1950 and 1999, as reflected in film. Topics include the re-introduction of realism, counterculture films, films by socially oriented and “new auteur directors,” and the impact of AIDS, relations between the sexes, and modern special effects. Aspects of cinema history are also examined, including the construct and use of certain genres, the relationship between cinematic realism and censorship, and the rise of independent film.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3200: American Film, Reflections of a Century III: The 21st Century

Analyzes trends in American cultural history as reflected in the movies from 1990 onwards, with an exploration of precursors. Topics include the digital age, globalism, millennialism, postmodernism, and what is to come in the future. Students examine connections between Western civilization and landmarks of film history—cinema mirroring society and vice versa.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3300: Management and Communication

The roles and theories of communication and leadership, together with the skills and traits of effective managers, are studied. Students examine how managers use behavioral modification and motivation techniques, develop coaching skills, manage change and conflict, and create a vision for their employees. The topics of strategy, organizational culture, and diversity are also included.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3320: Documentary Production

An examination of the history, cultural impact, and aesthetics of documentary film and video production. Through viewings, lectures, discussions, and hands-on exercises, students learn how to research, write, interview, direct, shoot, and edit a documentary. Using camcorders and editing equipment, students produce their own short documentaries.

Credits: 3

Department: Communication
COM 3350: Persuasive Speaking

Students learn how to influence others by crafting and orally delivering convincing messages that appeal to logic, reason, emotion, and feelings. Ancient rhetorical and contemporary scholarship is used to examine and compare persuasive speeches and advertisements. The class explores written, face-to-face, and digitally-mediated arguments in legal discourse, health, and marketing promotions. The student’s ability to identify speaking differences in style, arguments, and credibility is also sharpened.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3365: Advanced Psychology of Communication

This course focuses on understanding communication in relationships (interpersonal) and within the mind (intrapsychic: thinking, alone time, analyzing, understanding the external world and how one communicates internally). Topics include communication styles and communication in the intimate relationship, within the family, and at the workplace.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication
COM 3700: Teamwork Through Meetings

Knowing how to get work done through meetings is an increasingly important skill set. Students explore the discursive strategies used in a variety of multicultural business meetings, both face-to-face and virtual. Using communication methods, students analyze why some meetings are considered productive and others not so much, as well as the roles, relationships, conflict, and written documentation enacted therein.

Credits: 2

Department: Communication
COM 3701: The Business of Writing

Offers hands-on tools to prepare students to market their work while staying true to their artistic and creative sensibilities. Topics include how to submit work to producers, competitions, and companies. Students learn how to write professional synopses, query letters, and one-sheets, plus the technique of pitching, with practice pitching sessions.

Credits: 2

Department: Communication
COM 3702: Making On-Camera Presentations

After reviewing basic presentation skills and techniques, student gain experience handling digital devices to record presentations of themselves and others. Providing hands-on instruction and practice for conducting and recording professional presentations and interviews (still frame and in motion), the course also covers essential production elements: shooting and editing, interviewing and selecting sound bites, and writing and voicing.

Credits: 2

Department: Communication
COM 3710: A Critical Look at Television in Society: From “I Love Lucy” to Honey Boo Boo

Television is much more than a passive, incessant means of diversion—it is a powerful environment of ideas, emotions, and values that influences people’s thoughts, actions, and relationships. Students become acquainted with current issues concerning television in society and explore the impact of television on society. Aspects examined include the 1950s and mass culture, viewer response, serial/episodic structure, and the rise of cable.

Credits: 4

Department: Communication