Purchase College Catalog  2020 - 2021

Contents

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President’s Welcome

Purchase College is a place where creativity happens everywhere and where Think Wide Open isn’t just a slogan, it’s a clarion call and a way of life.

Purchase College

Founded in 1967 as part of the State University of New York comprehensive system, Purchase College was the fulfillment of Governor Nelson Rockefeller’s vision to create a learning community which combined professional conservatory programs in the performing and visual arts with rigorous studies in the liberal arts and sciences.

This vision continues to be the guiding force in our quest to provide an exceptional educational experience.

We are grateful to our many alumni and community members who support the college through scholarships, professorships, and distinguished programs. We will continue to provide access to scholarship and creativity to meet the needs of all of our constituents.

Purchase College is a vibrant, dynamic and diverse community. Join us here on campus, or virtually, and explore the many opportunities for engagement and leadership. Resources for learning and personal growth abound. Attend a performance, exhibition, or lecture; get involved and enjoy the rewards of making a difference.

Purchase welcomes you to Think Wide Open!

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About Purchase College

Mission, Vision, Values

Purchase College, SUNY, offers a unique education that combines programs in the liberal arts with conservatory programs in the arts in ways that emphasize inquiry, mastery of skills, and creativity. Our graduates contribute to the arts, humanities, sciences, and society.

Vision

Purchase College will be recognized nationally and internationally as the leading public institution to pair conservatory programs in the arts with liberal arts programs. We will continue to create opportunities for transformative learning and training in a community where disciplines connect, intersect, and enhance one another.

Values

Purchase College celebrates individuality, diversity, and creativity in a community of educational excellence.

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Academic Programs Overview

  • Purchase College combines, in one college and on one campus, four distinctive yet interacting academic foci: film and media studies, humanities, the natural and social sciences, and the performing and visual arts.

    As of this year, the college offers:

    • 50 undergraduate majors, 33 minors
    • 5 graduate programs
    • post-baccalaureate performers certificates and post-master’s artist diplomas in music
    • numerous internship and study abroad opportunities

    Approximately 70 percent of the matriculated students at Purchase College are enrolled in the BA, BS, and MA programs; the remaining 30 percent are enrolled in the BFA, MusB, MM, and MFA programs. In response to our rapidly changing global society, the college is continuing to develop integrative and interdisciplinary programs as well as innovative opportunities for international and online studies.

    Detailed information on the Purchase College School of the Arts and School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, their academic units, and the programs offered is available in the Academic Programs and Courses section of this catalog. In addition, Purchase College has one of the largest and most diverse continuing education programs in the State University of New York system. The School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education offers the liberal studies degree completion program with four majors, specifically designed for adults and transfer students who need to complete their Bachelor’s degree within a tight time-frame and with a flexible schedule. The school also offers both credit-bearing and noncredit courses for adults, college students, and eligible high school students; Professional certificate programs; And noncredit programs in the arts for children and teens.

    In addition, the school administers the college’s online winter session and its summer sessions, which attract students from colleges and universities across the nation.

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Nondiscrimination Policy

  • Purchase College is committed to fostering a diverse community of outstanding faculty, staff and students, as well as ensuring equal educational opportunity, employment, and access to service, programs, and activities, without regard to an individual’s race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, military status, domestic violence victim status, or criminal conviction. Employees, students, applicants, or other members of the Purchase community (including vendors, visitors, and guests) may not be subjected to harassment that is prohibited by law or treated adversely or retaliated against based upon a protected characteristic.

    Purchase complies with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination and harassment. These laws include the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as Amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, and the New York State Human Rights Law. These laws prohibit discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment and sexual violence.

    Sexual harassment is defined as: Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

    1. submission to such contact is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or education
    2. submission or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting the individual
    3. such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s welfare, academic or work performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile, or demeaning learning or work environment

    Sexual harassment may include:

    1. subtle persistent pressure for sexual activity
    2. unnecessary touching, pinching, and/or brushing against a person
    3. sexual coercion or assault
    4. demanding sexual favors with implied or overt threats concerning work or academic decision or preferential treatment
    5. unwelcome verbal/expressive behavior of a sexual nature (e.g., jokes, sounds, obscene phone calls, demeaning graphic portrayals)
    6. stalking, cyber stalking, and failure to accept the termination of a consensual relationship with repeated overtures or other aberrant or negative behavior

    Sexual violence has been defined as “physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent,” including rape, sexual battery, and sexual coercion.

    Domestic victim status has been defined by the Human Rights Law as an individual who is a victim of an act which would constitute a family offense under N.Y. Family Court Act § 812. It is unlawful to discriminate against a domestic violence victim in hiring for a job, job advancement, requests for use of leave time, or other terms, conditions or privileges of employment. It is also unlawful for an employer to take an action in retaliation for filing a complaint of discrimination.

    On-campus inquiries or complaints regarding violations of the Nondiscrimination Policy or Title IX may be addressed to:

    Jerima DeWese
    Affirmative Action/Chief Diversity Officer and Title IX Coordinator
    Purchase College
    735 Anderson Hill Road
    Purchase, NY 10577
    (914) 251-5992
    Jerima.DeWese@purchase.edu

    Inquiries may also be directed to:

    New York Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Education
    32 Old Slip, 26th Floor
    New York, NY 10005-2500
    Tel: (646) 428-3800, Fax: (646) 428-3843
    TDD: (800) 877-8339
    OCR.NewYork@ed.gov

    updated 5/3/2018

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Additional Information


Campus Overview

Campus in fallStand in the middle of campus and you’re 30 miles north of midtown Manhattan, but with nature as far as the eye can see.

Tucked away on a 500-acre former estate in Westchester County, our unique sprawling campus was designed by master architect Edward Larrabee Barnes. Almost all the buildings on the Purchase campus are the same color. Why is that? Well, there’s a historical reason and a metaphorical one.

The Story Behind the Brick

Our campus master plan relied upon several highly renowned architects to design the buildings on the Main Plaza. To unify these diverse structures and bring coherence to the campus, the architects were required to use the same shade of brick.

We like to think the consistency and order of the buildings’ facades is offset by the explosively colorful, diverse, and unconventional intellectual and artistic activity that happens inside them. Behind our uniform brick walls are classrooms, laboratories, performance spaces, and studios—those spaces where the real heart of campus can be found.

The Purchase Experience

Life here is hands-on and community-focused. We all pitch in to make Purchase a sustainable and diverse home for creative minds.

We’re DIY meets intellectualism, boundless intensity infused with an inquisitive spirit.

We’d love for you to come see us—schedule a tour and get the rundown from our Admissions Ambassadors.

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Your Right to Know

Higher Education Opportunity Information


Your Right to Know logoThe Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 contains numerous federal reporting and disclosure requirements for information from various administrative areas of higher education institutions. This website has been created to provide quick access to this information.

To the right are general consumer information subject areas, which provide links to references, reports, and additional details. For related information, please refer to Public Reports, which includes the college’s designated contacts for public institutional data and for the annual campus security report.

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SUNY Board of Trustees

The Board of Trustees is the governing body of the State University of New York. It consists of 18 members, 15 of whom are appointed by the Governor, with consent of the NYS Senate. The president of the Student Assembly serves as a voting member, and the presidents of the University Faculty Senate and Faculty Council of Community Colleges serve as non-voting members.

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SUNY Chancellor’s Cabinet

Chancellor Jim Malatras

Jim Malatras
Chancellor


Executive Leadership

Robert Megna headshot

Robert Megna
Senior Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer

Tod Laursen

Tod Laursen
Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor


Alphabetical (A-Z)

Sandra Casey

Sandra Casey
General Counsel in Charge

Johanna Duncan-Poitier headshot small

Johanna Duncan-Poitier
Senior Vice Chancellor for Community Colleges and the Education Pipeline

Stephanie Fargnoli

Stephanie Fargnoli
Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Health and Hospital Affairs

Robert Haelen

Robert Haelen
Senior Vice Chancellor for Capital Facilities & General Manager of the Construction Fund

Eileen McLoughlin

Eileen G. McLoughlin
Senior Vice Chancellor for Finance and Chief Financial Officer

Teresa Miller

Teresa Miller
Senior Vice Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Diversity Officer

Paul N. Patton headshot

Paul N. Patton
Senior Vice Chancellor and Chief Human Resources Officer

Travix Proulx

Travis Proulx
Vice Chancellor, Government Affairs and Marketing

Leo Rosales

Leo Rosales
Vice Chancellor, Press and Communications

Grace Wang

Jinliu “Grace” Wang
Senior Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development

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Purchase College Leadership


Purchase College Cabinet


  • Barry Pearson, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

    Barry Pearson

    Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

  • Jerima DeWese

    Jerima DeWese

    Chief Diversity and Affirmative Action Officer
    Title IX Coordinator and ADA Compliance Officer

  • Donna Frithsen

    Donna Frithsen

    Interim Vice President for Institutional Advancement
    Interim Executive Director of the Purchase College Foundation and Charitable Entities

  • Chief Dayton Tucker

    Dayton Tucker

    Chief of New York State University Police

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Academic Requirements

Undergraduate Core Curriculum / General Education

The core curriculum at Purchase College satisfies the SUNY general education requirements and engages all undergraduate students in essential learning.

All Purchase undergraduates complete coursework in a common core curriculum as they progress toward graduation in their chosen majors. The core curriculum ensures that students in all majors develop a foundation in a broad range of general education knowledge and skill areas, expressed in terms of student learning outcomes (SLOs).

  • Because these SLOs are shared across all 64 SUNY campuses, meeting a general education requirement at Purchase satisfies that requirement at any SUNY campus and vice versa.
  • Completing the Purchase College core curriculum satisfies all SUNY general education requirements.
  • Transfer students who have completed 30 general education credits and any 7 of the 10 SUNY general education content categories before admission to Purchase College will be awarded credit for fulfilling the Purchase core curriculum.

The student’s advisor and the registrar monitor each student’s progress toward the fulfillment of the core curriculum requirements; however, the final responsibility for completing the requirements rests with the student.

Approved General Education Courses, by SUNY Campus

This site, maintained by the SUNY System Administration, provides links to lists of approved general education courses at each SUNY campus, including Purchase core curriculum courses that satisfy SUNY general education requirements.

Undergraduate Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS)

  1. Earn a minimum of 120 credits. Of the 120 credits, a minimum number of credits in the liberal arts are required: 90 for the BA, 60 for the BS. A total of 45 credits must be earned in upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) courses. A maximum of 4 physical education credits may be applied toward the degree.
  2. Complete a minimum of 60 credits outside the student’s board of study (major).
  3. Complete the core curriculum/general education requirements.
  4. Complete all requirements for the major.
  5. Earn a minimum 2.0 (C) cumulative GPA at Purchase College.

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) and Bachelor of Music (MusB)

  1. Earn a minimum of 120 credits, at least 30 of which must be liberal arts credits.
  2. Complete the core curriculum/general education requirements.
  3. Complete all requirements for the major.*
  4. Earn a minimum 2.0 (C) cumulative GPA at Purchase College.

*The specific number of credits required for each performing and visual arts major is listed under each major’s academic requirements.

Graduate Degrees

Master of Arts (MA), Master of Fine Arts (MFA), and Master of Music (MM)

  1. Earn a minimum 3.0 (B) cumulative GPA at Purchase College.
  2. Complete all requirements for the major.

Academics Program Descriptions

School of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The goal of a liberal arts education is to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to critically appreciate, analyze, and resolve problems—both those encountered in the classroom and in society. To achieve this, the liberal arts curriculum is designed so that students are exposed to many fields of study while they gain mastery in a single discipline. Striking the right balance between in-depth study in a narrow area and exposure to a broad array of disciplinary perspectives enhances personal and professional success. Programs are designed to provide students with the concepts and critical thinking abilities necessary to understand, create, and communicate, as well as the requisite analytical skills to work effectively in their chosen fields of study.

Academic Organization

In the liberal arts and sciences at Purchase College, majors, interdisciplinary programs, and numerous concentrations and minors are offered by the School of Film and Media Studies, the School of Humanities, and the School of Natural and Social Sciences. Most undergraduate majors lead to the Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree. A Bachelor of Science (BS) degree is also available in biology, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree is offered in film. In the School of Humanities, the Master of Arts (MA) degree is offered in 20th-century art history.

Interdisciplinary Studies

Within the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, it is possible to major in one of three interdisciplinary BA degree programs: gender studies, Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies, and liberal arts. Students who wish to pursue an individualized program of study that cannot be accommodated within any of the conventional majors can work with faculty members from different departments to create a program of study leading to the BA in liberal arts. In addition, interdisciplinary minors are available in Asian studies, gender studies, global black studies, and Latin American studies.

Departments

Faculty in the liberal arts and sciences are organized by departments—groups of faculty members in the major disciplines. Departments assume major responsibility for the development of specific programs, the determination of program requirements, and student advising. In the case of interdisciplinary programs, faculty from various departments collaborate to provide those functions. When a student is ready to select a major, the appropriate department identifies a qualified advisor for the student. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the requirements of each program. New departments are created to shape and supervise new programs as student needs require and faculty resources permit.

Faculty

Faculty appointments in the liberal arts and sciences are made on the basis of effectiveness in teaching and dedication to undergraduate education, with attention to scholarly accomplishment and to the intellectual breadth essential to implement programs. Of our full-­time faculty, approximately 92 percent hold a doctorate or other terminal degree; Others are award-winning authors, journalists, and filmmakers. In addition to general teaching and advising responsibilities, faculty members guide tutorials and supervise independent research projects and senior theses.

Academic Advising

All students in the liberal arts and sciences have faculty advisors and plan their semester’s work in consultation with these advisors. Students are also strongly encouraged to use the services of the Advising Center. In particular, students who have not declared their major are encouraged to meet with an advisor in the Advising Center for guidance.

School of Film and Media Studies

Welcome to Film and Media Studies at Purchase.
Get involved in the production and critique of film, media, and video art.

Undergraduate Courses

Cinema Studies

Description:

An Intensive Immersion in the Art of Film

The cinema studies major offers students an opportunity for intensive study of the art of film through a broad range of courses in history and aesthetics.

  • All students begin with yearlong introductory surveys of film and modern art, then proceed to more advanced courses that focus on a wide variety of directors, national cinemas, genres, modes (narrative, documentary, avant-garde), and critical/theoretical approaches.
  • In their senior year, students explore and extend their knowledge of cultural, historical, industrial, philosophical, and artistic perspectives on the medium in their senior project.

Interdisciplinary and Rigorous

This interdisciplinary degree program is rigorous and highly selective, with official admission to the program contingent on successful completion of Introduction to Cinema Studies I and II during the freshman year and a qualifying examination in film history and aesthetics, which is given at the end of the freshman year.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all cinema studies majors must meet the following requirements (53–54 credits):

  1. CIN 1500/Introduction to Cinema Studies I (4 credits)
  2. CIN 1510/Introduction to Cinema Studies II (4 credits)
  3. One art history course (3–4 credits), chosen from the following or approved by the cinema studies program coordinator:
    ARH 1020/History of Art Survey II
    ARH 1060/Touchstones of Modern Art
    ARH 1070/The Work of Images: The Function of Art in Western Culture
    ARH 2050/Introduction to Modern Art
    ARH 2060/Art Since 1945
  4. One of the following courses (4 credits):
    CIN 2000/Close Analysis
    CIN 2500/Principles of Montage
    CIN 3005/Cinema and the Archive
  5. Six upper-level elective courses in cinema studies* (24 credits total)
    *Learning assistantships, internships, and independent studies cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.
  6. CIN 3890/Cinema Studies Junior Seminar (4 credits)
  7. CIN 4890/Cinema Studies Senior Colloquium (2 credits)
  8. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I (4 credits)
  9. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II (4 credits)

Notes:

  1. A grade of B or higher is required in CIN 1500 and 1510.
  2. To advance to the sophomore year, students must pass a qualifying examination in film history and aesthetics, which is given at the end of the freshman year.

Faculty

  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, University of Rochester
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, University of Vermont
    • MA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Brock University, Ontario
    • MA, Ryerson University and York University, Ontario
    • PhD, University of Chicago
  • Lecturer, Cinema Studies
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, New York University
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Lecturer in Cinema Studies
    • BA, University of South Africa
    • MA, University of Witwatersrand
    • PhD, University of South Africa
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies and History
    Director, School of Film and Media Studies
    • PhD, University of Maryland
  • Associate Professor of Film and Cinema Studies
    Dean for Global Strategy and International Programs
    • BA, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • MA, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
    • MPhil, PhD, Yale University
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Hunter College, City University of New York
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Liaoning University (China)
    • MA, Beijing Film Academy
    • PhD, University of Chicago

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Practice in Screenwriting
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BA, Vassar College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BA, University of Notre Dame
  • Associate Provost for Academic Affairs
    • BA, University of Toronto
    • MA, PhD, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Associate Professor of Philosophy
    • BA, University of California, Santa Cruz
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Professor of Literature
    • BA, Yale University
    • MA, PhD, Rutgers University
    • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching
  • Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Grinnell College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Associate Professor of Screenwriting
    • BA, City College of New York
    • MFA, Yale School of Drama
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

Courses

An overview of the development of film as an art and as an industry from silent to digital cinema. Students learn the stylistic, narrative and industrial developments of cinema through the analysis of classic films.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

An intensive study of film history with analysis of specific films that represent stages in the evolution of the formal aspects of cinematic expression. Film showings, lectures, seminars.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

A continuation of CIN 1500.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500

Department: Cinema Studies

The techniques of filmic expression are examined through a focused, detailed analysis of cinematography, editing, lighting, mise-en-scène, and soundtrack in celebrated cinematic works from around the world. Course content is organized around the establishment or subversion of narrative, generic, and stylistic conventions through the works of one director, a particular genre, or a film movement.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Examines the history of music videos, studying their effectiveness as a sales mechanisms as well as their influence on how today’s movies, television and commercials are photographed. Students are required to shoot practice exercises throughout the semester, complete a final paper, and shoot a music video on their own for a campus band or musician. Students must have experience operating a video camera and have access to a digital editing platform or be familiar with Final Cut Pro.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

The goals of this course are two-fold. First, the history of silent film through the advent of sound is explored to reveal what early cinema can teach about the present and future of visual culture. Second, students use this exploration into early cinema to improve their film research skills, from data gathering to revision.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An intensive course for cinema studies majors that combines hands-on practice with close analysis. Students explore the art of montage by analyzing the film language of great directors and by shooting and editing short video projects, with an emphasis on the major principles of montage.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Research and practice in film programming practices and histories. Students research historical and contemporary case studies in film programming and exhibition while engaging in their own on-campus programming. They organize film series and screenings, gaining hands-on experience with and studying diverse perspectives on programming, distribution, curating, fundraising, advertising, engaging in audience outreach, event managing, researching, and writing.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Third cinema was a movement proposed by Latin American directors in the 1960s and further developed by African directors in the 1970s. It addresses important questions about independent national cinemas, colonialism, race, and identity. This course examines the movement and its global influence, with emphasis on the cinemas of Latin America, Africa, black Britain, and American minorities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An intensive focus on the intersection between cinema and history. Students examine the debates around cinema’s status as historical document, surveying different approaches to the relationship between cinematic formal traditions and social history. The course emphasizes the analysis of primary sources, such as reviews, posters, magazine and newspaper articles, personal correspondence, trade publications, and blogs.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Through a historical survey of documentary and ethnographic film, this course explores documentary theory, aesthetics, and ethics. Topics include early cinema, World War II propaganda, cinema verité, radical documentary, the essay film, counter-ethnographies, and contemporary mixed forms. Films by the Lumières, Flaherty, Marker, Rouch, Minh-ha, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Asian cinema is often rechanneled by the socio-political and cultural situations created by colonialism, wars, revolutions, and global capitalism. This course examines Asian cinemas within the context of international film history and explores significant genres, movements, and themes from the 1920s to the present. The course investigates how the transnational cinematic flow engages with discourses on nationalism, internationalism and cosmopolitanism.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1510 Or CIN1030

Department: Cinema Studies

Students in this course will write, shoot and edit short documentary and/or fiction films reflecting the culture and country where the films are shot. International student teams work together on locations in USA, Haiti and Africa to produce films which will be screened at cultural events and film festivals.

Credits: 1

Department: Cinema Studies

Working in collaboration with students from film schools in France and Africa, students engage in preproduction via video conference on film projects they will complete together during a subsequent summer study abroad session. Students also examine contemporary cinematic trends in France and Africa, with special focus on diverse geographical settings, cultural and aesthetic histories, and conditions of production and exhibition.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An intense focus on sound technology, with careful attention to the way image, dialogue, music, and sound interact in both film and video. The history of sound technology and sound theory are explored by comparing sound innovations in other fields (music, radio, television) to developments in film/video. Films include The Jazz Singer, The Conversation, Pi, and Run Lola Run.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An exploration of cult films and the subculture surrounding them. What elements determine the second life of films beyond their initial phase of consumption? Do these films share certain characteristics, or does their cult status depend entirely on viewing practices? How do these subcultures police their boundaries? What reading strategies do these subcultures employ? These questions also allow students to reflect on their attachment to films.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Examines the state of television today, with special attention to new genres, narratives, technologies, audiences, and corporate practices, with special attention to the growth of cable networks, online sites, streaming serials, new modes of spectatorship, and new forms of fan culture.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A survey of the development of broadcasting and electronic media in the United States. It emphasizes the cultural and institutional history of the medium, as well as the aesthetic of televisual genres.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1500

Department: Cinema Studies

A survey of the history of Mexican cinema from the early 1930s to the present. Students examine popular genres like la comedia ranchera (Mexican cowboy musical), el género cabaretil (dancehall film), and el cine de luchadores (wrestling film) as well as the work of the most prominent Mexican filmmakers (e.g., Arturo Ripstein, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, Nicolás Echeverría, María Novaro, Guillermo del Toro).

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

The films covered offer an opportunity to deeply analyze the formation of national identity, migration, gender and race relations, social inequalities, the rural and urban worlds, and political events that have had an impact on the contemporary societies of Portugal, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, and Angola.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A survey of animated filmmaking from the inception of cinema to the contemporary era.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Explores the role of cinematic representation in shaping the urban imagination. Taking both a historical and a comparative approach, students study the figuration of American, European, and non-Western cities from the silent era to the digital age. Discussions include how cinema has portrayed these metropolitan areas and their people, cultures, and public and private spaces.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An examination of improvisation in scripts, performances, and the directorial design and production process. Students study the techniques of such filmmakers as John Cassavetes and Mike Leigh, the basics of improvisation taught by Viola Spolin and others, and theories of aleatory form; participate in improvisatory scenes; and make a film using improvisational techniques.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An advanced seminar on theories of cinematic and computational media via “the war machine.” Focus is on the relationship between cinematic and military techniques and technologies—what Virilio dubbed “the deadly harmony” between eye and weapon. Emphasis is also placed on the sociopolitics of code, the ramifications of informatic capture and the formation of coded bodies, and the rise of new machines of war and resistance.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Students discuss and analyze films in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

As people migrate across the globe, their media forms move with them—sometimes following them, documenting their movement, other times traveling with them, as traces of their home cultures. Focusing on a variety of transnational media forms, this course examines how media producers treat themes of home, nation, belonging, migration, immigration, displacement, alienation, border crossing, and mobile identities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or MSA2200 Or NME2100

Department: Cinema Studies

A detailed examination of a filmmaker’s career. Students analyze films in light of a filmmaker’s entire output while situating the artist’s creative process in relation to the industrial and historical context. The course also introduces students to the tradition of auteur criticism.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Designed to foster screenwriting, beginning with creation of the script and working toward completion of a short film by the end of the term. Creative writing and cinema studies students collaborate at all stages of the process, including writing, producing, directing, and editing.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

In this course, affect is considered as a form of power—the embodied capacity to affect and be affected. Students explore affective genres of visual culture, such as horror, comedy, melodrama, and pornography. The course draws on a range of theoretical perspectives on affect and emotion, emphasizing work from psychoanalysis, philosophy, feminism, and queer theory.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A study of contemporary global cinema and recent trends in cinematic style and narrative. The course focuses on non-American/non-European cinemas and co-productions and on important developments in the regional cinemas of Africa and Latin America. The final quarter examines “cinema” from a global perspective, particularly the extent to which new technology and cultural circuits have fostered techniques, styles, and narrative forms.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Examines recent debates in media theory, offering critical frameworks to understand the complexities of what a “medium” is, its forms and aesthetics, how it circulates and interacts with subjects and objects, and how it culturally signifies. Critical inquiry is grounded in a range of media texts, from films to reality TV, video games, and artworks.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Focuses on the changing landscape of national and regional cinemas of Europe from the 1980s to the present, including the advent of the MTV-influenced cinéma du look movement in France and the neorealist, indie-inspired filmmaking in the Balkan and former Soviet states. The contested (re)definition of what now encompasses ”European cinema” is a defining undercurrent of the course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An introduction to the history and modes of film criticism, using the films of Alfred Hitchcock or John Ford (depending on the instructor) as the focal point. The goal is to familiarize students with the diversity of critical approaches in film studies, to make them better critics, and to do so by understanding both the aesthetic qualities and social forces that have made Hitchcock (or Ford) not only one of the great film personae of the 20th century, but also a marketing device, an aesthetic, a genre, and a field of study.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Networked computing has reconfigured cultural production, distribution, textual practices, and consumption. Students investigate how cinema registers these shifts by analyzing films that address the internet and by examining the ways that computing technologies renew film’s significance. Readings cover the latest conversations in media theory, addressing such issues as photographic indexicality, database narratives, digital aesthetics, software studies, and social media.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Historical trauma has characterized the 20th century. Traumatic events return in unexpected forms, haunting communities and shaping both collective memory and mourning practices. Taking a comparative approach across national cinemas, this course analyzes the historical context, style, and narratives of films that circle around the question of trauma. The course covers German, Israeli, Chilean, Japanese, Russian, and American cinemas.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Major tendencies in Eastern European cinemas between World War II and the late 1980s are explored. Focusing on Polish, Hungarian, Czechoslovakian, and Yugoslav films, students examine the development of these national cinemas in the sociopolitical context of state socialism, and the flourishing of these cinematic traditions into internationally recognized movements and schools. Major thematic and stylistic preoccupations of Eastern European filmmakers are addressed through a close study of works by Polanski, Wajda, Forman, Jancso, Makavejev, Kusturica, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Racial imagery in the U.S., from the minstrel era to the present, is examined. Students interrogate the mythologies of this imagery as depicted in U.S. literature and film; rethink key analytical categories in cinema and literary studies in light of U.S. race history (genre and spectatorship); and study the racial uses of and meanings behind certain technical innovations in U.S. literature and filmmaking.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Emerging queer cinema is explored in its historical contexts and its relation to contemporary theories of gender, sexuality, and their intersection with race, class, and nationality. The course focuses on the “queering of the gaze,” interrogating conventional notions of representation, desire, identification, filmmaking, and spectatorship. Featured directors: Warhol, Fassbinder, Haynes, Von Trotta, Akerman, Rozema, La Bruce, Araki, Denis, Jarman.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

An in-depth look at French-language cinema “beyond the hexagon”—that is, film and media originating from regions of the world outside of France, including Africa, the Middle East, the French Caribbean, Belgium, Switzerland, and Québec. The impact of diverse geographical settings, cultural histories, and conditions of production and exhibition are addressed, along with such factors as colonialization, hybridity, diaspora, and globalization.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Stanley Kubrick was one of the most original and cinematic of all film directors. His films were highly original in form, with an innovative use of the medium’s primary elements, including editing, composition, and camera movement. Most were also adaptations of classic and contemporary literature. His ability to transform an author’s literary vision into his cinematic vision was one of the keys to his genius. This course analyzes his films on their own terms and in comparison to their literary sources.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An exploration of the cinema of David Cronenberg from the beginning of his career to the present.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A detailed examination of the notion of film genre, and consideration of one or more classical Hollywood genres, including the western, musical, melodrama, and film noir.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

In light of a resurgence of the western in film and television, this course spans the history of the genre, from the earliest silent screen versions of dime store novels to its contemporary manifestations. While paying careful attention to the western as myth, epic, and landscape art, the course also explores themes of freedom, justice, and individualism as embedded and transformed in the genre.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Film noir represents the intersection of theme and style that gave American films from 1941 to 1955 a new cynicism, moral ambiguity, and atmosphere of terror. This course attempts to define and explore the concept of film noir by close analysis of films like The Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, Detour, The Big Heat, The Big Combo, Somewhere in the Night, and Kiss Me Deadly.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Film and theories of the American avant-garde cinema since 1943. The approach is historical, surveying the various periods in the American avant-garde and their relation to contemporary cultural phenomena. Among the artists considered are Harry Smith, George Landow, Jonas Mekas, Ken Jacobs, Ernie Gehr, Stan Brakhage, Maya Deren, Kenneth Anger, Michael Snow, and Hollis Frampton.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Examines the historical, cultural, and production contexts of experimental and avant-garde filmmaking. This course attempts an internationalist breadth of coverage by examining the European historical avant-gardes, the American avant-garde of the pre– and post–World War II periods, the underground and independent film movements of the 1960s, and the function of experimental cinema in shaping personal and communal identities (feminist, queer, and minorities).

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

History of American independent filmmaking from the 1940s to the present. Focuses on a range of directors, including Sam Fuller, Morris Engel, John Cassavetes, and Robert Altman.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An examination of the political imaginary of 21st century Hollywood film. Drawing on the writings of Siegfried Kracauer, students place contemporary American cinema in a comparative historical framework in order to understand the complex ways that ideological formations (imperialism, authoritarianism, racism, neoliberalism, leftism/progressivism) are encoded within the imagery and narratives of popular film and related media.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A survey of the most important developments in film theory. Early theoretical discussions were mostly guided by the need to understand and to legitimize film as a distinct art form and as a new technology of seeing. As a result of the legitimization of film as a cultural fact, film theory became more specialized and a field of its own, alongside art history, literary theory, and philosophy. This course explores how each of these fields has contributed to a deeper understanding of cinema.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Investigation of a range of filmmakers who attempt to convey the spiritual through manipulation of film form. Films by Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer, Tarkovsky, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

In this course on internationally acclaimed auteurs of East Asian cinema (Japan, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea), emphasis is placed on the concepts of “national cinema” and “new waves.” In particular, the critique of nationalism via a radicalization of both content and form in the various new waves is examined.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A key element of the classical Hollywood tradition (e.g., classical form, the auteur, the star system, or studio practices) is considered in detail.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

American cinema underwent significant upheaval during the 1950s with the crumbling of the studio system, the proliferation of television, fallout from the McCarthy hearings, and the Cold War. This course examines how such directors as Minnelli, Fuller, Welles, Preminger, Sirk, and Ray responded to these extremes, with attention to the historical circumstances and formal innovations that defined the era.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Howard Hawks and Billy Wilder—two of Hollywood’s greatest directors—made sophisticated, brilliantly crafted variations on such genres as the gangster film, comedy, western, musical, and film noir. This course examines the complex issues surrounding authorship in Hollywood film, while considering films to be artworks, social artifacts, and commercial entities shaped by genre expectations and factors beyond the control of any individual creative figure.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

A study of American mainstream films of the “New Hollywood” or “New American” period of cinema, c. 1965 to the present. Students explore the evolution of American popular cinema in relation to stylistic innovation in international cinema, shifting audience demographics in the domestic market, and industrial and social change in the U.S.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Andy Warhol was the most influential visual American artist to emerge during the 1960s, redefining the practice and meaning of fine art and popular culture. Turning his studio, the Factory, into an avant-garde version of a Hollywood soundstage, Warhol created films that are astonishingly rich in pictorial and behavioral nuance. This course examines Warhol’s films and his legacy in film/video art.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Survey of Italian cinema of the postneorealist era, with special focus on the films of Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An advanced seminar focusing on the criticism of André Bazin, a co-founder of the influential magazine Cahiers du Cinéma and prolific author (What is Cinema? Vol. 1 and 2); the cinema that he championed, including Italian neorealism; his influence on post–World War II film studies and criticism; and his current renaissance in contemporary filmmaking and criticism.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Examination of the rise of New German Cinema in the 1960s and 1970s, with special attention paid to cultural, political, and aesthetic contexts. Directors studied include Alexander Kluge, Volker Schlondorff, Werner Herzog, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and Helma Sanders-Brahms.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An examination of cinema in the Israeli and Palestinian context, from the Lumière brothers’ actualities to contemporary productions by Ari Folman, Amos Gitai, Michel Khleifi, and Elia Suleiman. What role has the medium played in articulating ethnoreligious identity, national ideology, traumatic historical experience, and conflicting territorial claims? How do Middle Eastern films challenge traditional conceptions of cinematic space and time?

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

The French refer to filmmaking as the seventh art, i.e., an art form on the level of other fine arts. This course examines French cinema from the silent era to 1970, with special focus on poetic realism and the French New Wave. Films by Vigo, Carné, Renoir, Melville, Truffaut, Godard, Rivette, Rohmer, Resnais, Marker, Varda, and others.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

The profile of what people think of as “French” cinema has undergone considerable change from the turbulent post-1968 period to the present. This course focuses on major developments in contemporary French cinema from the vantage points of aesthetics, industry, and culture. The role of government subsidies, large European co-productions, and shifts in cultural attention from high-art auteurs (individual authors) to the banlieue (suburb) are studied closely.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Melodrama is both a historical genre and a mode of imagination that operates across media. To bridge these two aspects of melodrama, the course examines its theatrical origins, the film genres that employ its rhetorical devices (the woman’s film, action and disaster films, horror), and its further development in television series and soap operas.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An examination of how environments are represented across media forms and how they mediate cultural practices. Media forms include landscape painting, nature photography, art installations, music, nature writing, science fiction writing, and eco-cinema. Cultural practices include romantic, philosophical, and aesthetic traditions; indigeneities, nationalism, environmentalism, warfare, eco-mafias; and the arts and sciences of biomedia.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or MSA1050 Or ANT1500

Department: Cinema Studies

A survey of the most important developments in film theory. The goal is to familiarize students with the diversity of critical approaches in film studies and increase understanding of both the aesthetic qualities and social forces at work. Topics include the relationship of film to other forms of media and alternative or counter-hegemonic conceptions of cinema.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

In this advanced seminar comparing the directors Welles and Resnais, their entire oeuvres and their engagement with contemporary theories and philosophies are addressed.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Science fiction is addressed as an expanded field of inquiry into bodies, machines, science, and technology. The course focuses on narratives about metropolis, colony, utopia, and other technologies of state, self, gender, race, and capital. It also focuses on various figures (e.g., automaton, android, cyborg, avatar, alien) that have populated films from the birth of cinema to the present.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

Prepares cinema studies majors for the conception and writing of their senior project. The course emphasizes research skills, the formulation of a prospectus and a literature review, the development of a bibliography and a filmography, and the outline of a schedule for completion of the project.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: Cinema Studies

An introduction to the craft of digital filmmaking: cinematography, lighting, staging, sound mixing, and editing. Students work in groups on short exercises to develop their skills and collaborate on a final short film.

Credits: 3

Department: Cinema Studies

In this introduction to the basics of documentary filmmaking, students learn what it means to construct a visual argument, with attention to process, place, documentary ethics, and good interviewing techniques. Production is complemented by screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM1050 Or CMS1400 Or COM1400

Department: Cinema Studies

In this continuation of Documentary Filmmaking, students design, research, and produce their own documentary film. Screenings, class discussions, and group critique complement the production of the film.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM3025 Or CIN3320

Department: Cinema Studies

An intensive production-oriented course designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of storytelling in narrative film. The course covers dramatic and stylistic elements of filmmaking. Students direct and edit three short films during the semester, each assignment demonstrating specific principles covered in class.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM1050 Or CMS1400 Or COM1400

Department: Cinema Studies

Students closely analyze the construction and purpose of a short sequence in the context of the overall story. This course examines the various emotional and intellectual levels layered within a scene that can and do impact the audience. Students write, direct, and edit a short film during the semester.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: CIN1100 Or FLM3050

Department: Cinema Studies

An overview of the development and tradition of Chinese cinema through representative screenings of important films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the historical and political context(s) that informed the creation and reception of these films and learn critical scholarly terminology and historical issues related to the analysis of Chinese film.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Students explore the underlying historical narratives of films from 1930 to 1960 that address topics from early America. These narratives are compared to the ways Hollywood recast historical lessons to suit modern circumstances and to promote “American values” challenged by economic depression and the rise of fascism and communism. Special emphasis is on the works of Ford and Capra.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Considers the intersections of sexual difference and cinema. Topics include theories of enunciation and sexual difference, female authorship and the idea of “women’s cinema,” gender and genre, woman as spectacle, the female spectator, and feminist film theory. Representations of sexual difference in films by selected male directors are studied as a means of examining the institution(s) of cinematic expression. The bulk of the course is devoted to studying women directors as they attempt to work within and against that institution.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Surrealist literature, films, and art in France, Spain, and Latin America. Artists include Aragon, Breton, Buñuel, Césaire, Char, Dali, Eluard, and Lorca. Works are read in translation and lectures given in English; students with French and/or Spanish are encouraged to read in the original language.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

In 1991, The Real World pioneered a genre of “unscripted” television that reshaped national media culture, culminating in the reality of the 2016 election. Students study theories of Hall, Habermas and Gramsci to explore how the genre reflects and shapes attitudes of U.S. audiences to surveillance, class conflict, and the performance of truths. Examples include Jersey Shore and American Idol.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 Or MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: Cinema Studies

Students collaborate with students in other cultures, using the Internet to produce videos on subjects of mutual interest. Because the focus is on developing a cross-cultural dialogue, basic video production experience is expected. Before moving to video, the two groups collaboratively write fiction. During the semester, they meet in video conferences with their peers abroad to discuss their productions. Previous semesters have included collaborations with students at universities in Belarus, Turkey, Mexico, Germany, and Lithuania.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

An interdisciplinary examination of the subject of happiness, using a variety of ancient and modern literary and philosophical works as well as films. Students analyze the texts and films for their specific content but also for a deepened sense of the possible relationships between visual and discursive representations of narratives.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Do photographic images have privileged access to truth? This course explores the complicated relationship between truth and visual (particularly filmic) images. It begins with Plato on the “fakery” that is painting, turns to 17th-century “faithfulness” and “sincerity” in still-life painting and scientific drawing, and looks in depth at 20th-century writings about the nature of photography and realism in representation.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

A critical examination of influential attempts to understand the nature of the cinematic medium. Questions raised include: Is film a fine art? Must a movie “represent reality” if it is to succeed as a movie? Are there certain insights into human experience that are better expressed through film than through other media? Readings include Siegfried Kracauer, André Bazin, and Stanley Cavell.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or PHI1515 Or PHI2110 Or PHI3212

Department: Cinema Studies

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Spain and Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Films are discussed and analyzed in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

Department: Cinema Studies

Film

Description:

The BFA film program provides highly motivated and talented students with intensive conservatory training in all aspects of filmmaking. Students develop significant skills in directing, cinematography, editing, production, screenwriting, and film analysis. By the end of the sophomore year, students consult with the film faculty and choose to focus on either narrative, documentary, or experimental film production in their junior year.

The primary emphasis of the BFA program is on writing/directing. At the end of the junior year, however, film majors who have demonstrated exceptional talent in cinematography or screenwriting have the option of specializing in those areas, subject to approval by the program faculty. The faculty’s decision is based on demonstration of the student’s technical and artistic proficiency.

Facilities

Film majors enjoy a high equipment-to-student ratio and have access to fully equipped newly renovated sound stages, a mix studio, an equipment store, state of the art screening rooms, and digital editing studios.

About Our Alumni

More than 85 percent of film program alumni have found work in the film and television industries. These are just a few of our representative alumni: Jessica Brunetto, Ilya Chaiken, Austin Chick, Rocco Caruso, Bob Gosse, Nick Gomez, Brandon Harris, Hal Hartley, Azazel Jacobs, Lesli Klainberg, Dani Michaeli, Whitney Ransick, Jimmie Joe Roche, Jeffrey Schwarz, James Spione, Chris Wedge, and Julia Wrona.

Updated 9-22-20

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all film majors must complete the following requirements (104–106 credits, outlined below by year) and maintain the board-of-study standards for academic and professional conduct.

Requirements for the major include:

  1. A minimum of 24 credits in film history, criticism, and/or theory: CIN 1500 and 1510 plus four additional courses
  2. Satisfactory completion, as determined by the Film Board of Study, of the 16-credit senior thesis film

Note: Criteria for advancement also include the student’s fitness and potential for a professional life in the field, as determined by the board of study. Advancement each year is by invitation of the board of study following a scheduled, mandatory review of each student’s work. Any student on warning or probationary status is reviewed at the end of the semester (fall or spring). There is an ongoing assessment of professional growth in all work for all students.

Freshman Year | Sophomore Year | Junior Year | Senior Year

Freshman Year: 31 credits

FLM 1090 and 1100/Exercises in Storytelling* 6 credits
FLM 1160 and 1170/Film Workshop* 10 credits
FLM 1250/Filmmakers Acting Workshop 2 credits
CIN 1500 and 1510/Introduction to Cinema Studies I and II 8 credits
FLM 2010/Film Editing I 3 credits
FLM 2090/Cinematography I 2 credits
*Part One and Two (two-semester course)
Note: CIN 1500 and 1510 are prerequisites for most film history courses.

Sophomore Year: 27 credits

FLM 2000 and 2050/Introduction to Documentary: Nonfiction Film* 10 credits
FLM 2020/Film Editing II 3 credits
FLM 2100/Cinematography II 2 credits
FLM 2310 and 2320/Directors’ Scene Workshop* 6 credits
FLM 2810/Writing for Film I 2 credits
CIN —/Film history elective 4 credits
*Part One and Two (two-semester course)

Junior Year: 24–26 credits

One of the following two-semester courses: 6–8 credits
FLM 3200 and 3210/Film Directors’ Workshop* (8 credits) or
FLM 3460 and 3470/Documentary Workshop I and II (8 credits) or
FLM 3610 and 3620/Experimental Workshop* (6 credits)
FLM 3090/Cinematography III 2 credits
FLM 3250/Directing the Actor 2 credits
FLM 3320/Screenwriting 3 credits
FLM 3650/Advanced Sound 3 credits
CIN —/Two electives in film history, criticism, and/or theory 8 credits
*Part One and Two (two-semester course)

Senior Year: 22 credits

FLM 3725/The Business of Film

2 credits
FLM 4180 and 4190/Senior Production: Filmmaking* 16 credits
CIN —/One elective in film history, criticism, and/or theory 4 credits
*Part One and Two (two-semester course)

Faculty

  • Lecturer in Film
    • BFA, New York University
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, University of Rochester
  • Lecturer in Film/Video minor
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Assistant Professor of Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • EdM, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Lecturer in Film
    • MFA, NYU Graduate School in Film
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BA, Vassar College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BA, University of Notre Dame
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BA, UC Berkeley
    • MFA, American Film Institute
  • Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Professor of Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MA, New York University
  • Lecturer in Film
    • AB, Harvard University
  • Lecturer, Film
    • BA, Wellesley College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Film/Video minor
    • BA, Loyola Marymount University
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting and Film
    Media Manager
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Assistant Professor of Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Film
    • B.A. Film Production, UCLA
    • B.A. International Development Studies, UCLA
    • M.A. Visual Communication, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Lecturer in Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Film and Cinema Studies
    Dean for Global Strategy and International Programs
    • BA, University of Wisconsin, Madison
    • MA, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
    • MPhil, PhD, Yale University
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Hunter College, City University of New York
  • Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Liaoning University (China)
    • MA, Beijing Film Academy
    • PhD, University of Chicago
  • Visiting Assistant Professor
    • BFA, New York University
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Courses

An introduction to the craft of digital filmmaking: cinematography, lighting, staging, sound mixing, and editing. Students work in groups on short exercises to develop their skills and collaborate on a final short film.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

A series of weekly exercises to develop the student’s ability to write short stories. The problems of exposition, characterization, conflict, and action are discussed and studied. Limited to freshman film majors.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

A series of weekly exercises to develop the student’s ability to write short stories. The problems of exposition, characterization, conflict, and action are discussed and studied. Limited to freshman film majors.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Introduces the possibilities of film technique. Short projects in motion picture cinematography, lighting, sound recording, and continuity editing, augmented by lectures, demonstrations, film analysis, and readings. In the spring, systems of cinematic structure and form are emphasized.

Credits: 5

Department: Film

Introduces the possibilities of film technique. Short projects in motion picture cinematography, lighting, sound recording, and continuity editing, augmented by lectures, demonstrations, film analysis, and readings. In the spring, systems of cinematic structure and form are emphasized.

Credits: 5

Department: Film

An introduction to the role of the actor in filmmaking situations. Freshman film students engage in actual acting training to learn how actors and filmmakers can best interact and to experience how best to understand the acting process.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

Practical aspects of documentary filmmaking. Students produce four to five short films each term (including describing a process, a place, an interview, and a film portrait). Production is complemented by screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations.

Credits: 5

Department: Film

Students learn the fundamentals of film language through editing and are provided with professionally produced picture and sound rushes that they sync-up, structure, and edit into a complete film. Additional individual and group projects are assigned.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Students learn the fundamentals of film language through editing and are provided with professionally produced picture and sound rushes that they sync-up, structure, and edit into a complete film. Additional individual and group projects are assigned.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Practical aspects of documentary filmmaking. Students produce four to five short films each term (including describing a process, a place, an interview, and a film portrait). Production is complemented by screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations.

Credits: 5

Department: Film

Basics of photography, camera operation, crew organization, picture composition, and lighting.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

Camera movement, angles and blocking, studio lighting procedures, and introduction to gaffing and electrics.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: FLM2090 Or TFI2090

Department: Film

In this introduction to directing narrative film, students produce scenes from their own original and previously produced scripts. They chose materials and cast, direct, and edit four to five short narrative films each term.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

The techniques of writing for the screen in both the narrative and documentary forms. Emphasis on the construction of dramatic material without the use of spoken dialogue leads to a better understanding of the power and importance of visual imagery as a prime component in storytelling, and to a heightened awareness of the camera’s role in the writing process.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

In this introduction to the basics of documentary filmmaking, students learn what it means to construct a visual argument, with attention to process, place, documentary ethics, and good interviewing techniques. Production is complemented by screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM1050 Or CMS1400 Or COM1400

Department: Film

In this continuation of Documentary Filmmaking, students design, research, and produce their own documentary film. Screenings, class discussions, and group critique complement the production of the film.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM3025 Or CIN3320

Department: Film

An intensive production-oriented course designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of storytelling in narrative film. The course covers dramatic and stylistic elements of filmmaking. Students direct and edit three short films during the semester, each assignment demonstrating specific principles covered in class.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM1050 Or CMS1400 Or COM1400

Department: Film

Students closely analyze the construction and purpose of a short sequence in the context of the overall story. This course examines the various emotional and intellectual levels layered within a scene that can and do impact the audience. Students write, direct, and edit a short film during the semester.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: CIN1100 Or FLM3050

Department: Film

Individual projects in advanced cinematography.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

Advanced techniques in cinematography and lighting, with group and individual projects.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: FLM3090 Or TFI3090

Department: Film

An advanced two-semester course designed to explore the technique, practice, and theory of motion picture directing. Exercises in mise-en-scène, screenwriting, and fiction filmmaking. Students must write, cast, and direct a complete narrative short film for presentation at the end of the spring term.

Credits: 4

Department: Film

An advanced two-semester course designed to explore the technique, practice, and theory of motion picture directing. Exercises in mise-en-scène, screenwriting, and fiction filmmaking. Students must write, cast, and direct a complete narrative short film for presentation at the end of the spring term.

Credits: 4

Department: Film

Examines the role of the director in casting the right actor, and aiding actors in creating character and performances through rehearsal, discussion, improvisation, and on-set techniques. Students study directing, learning techniques of acting and what actors need from the director in terms of preparation and performance.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

A practical course in the writing of screenplays. A preliminary screenplay for the senior thesis film must be completed by the end of the semester.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

An intermediate-level course in the practice of documentary filmmaking. A series of exercises in 16mm and video documentary production are complemented by screenings, class discussions, group projects, and demonstrations. Students research, design, and complete a documentary film.

Credits: 4

Department: Film

An intermediate-level course in the practice of documentary filmmaking. A series of exercises in 16mm and video documentary production are complemented by screenings, class discussions, group projects, and demonstrations. Students research, design, and complete a documentary film.

Credits: 4

Department: Film

Students conceptualize and produce experimental media projects using techniques and concepts of avant-garde filmmaking, video art, and performance art. Nontraditional and personal forms are emphasized. Construction of a DVD anthology and off-campus excursions are also required. Both FLM 3610 (fall) and 3620 (spring) are required for film students planning an experimental thesis project for junior review.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Students conceptualize and produce experimental media projects using techniques and concepts of avant-garde filmmaking, video art, and performance art. Nontraditional and personal forms are emphasized. Construction of a DVD anthology and off-campus excursions are also required. Both FLM 3610 (fall) and 3620 (spring) are required for film students planning an experimental thesis project for junior review.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Committed to using sound tracks as fully as the image track, this course implements theory by teaching choice and placement of microphones, dialogue track prep, music editing, use of sound FX and tone, and prepping for a professional sound mix. Students visit with a professional sound editor and attend foley, dubbing, and mix studio demonstrations.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Strategies for the structuring and pacing of films, taught through the editing of specific film projects.

Credits: 3

Department: Film

Prepares students for entry into the film industry. Covers basic techniques used to raise money for, produce, and distribute films.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

Construction and writing of screenplays, with exercises in characterization, plotting, etc. Story treatments for both fiction and documentary films are stressed.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

An intensive, one-semester workshop course in which students write, produce and direct a short documentary or narrative film. Production proceeds only after faculty approval of the screenplay, casting, and production schedules. Students assist in the production of one fellow classmate’s film. Projects developed for this course may be used in conjunction with senior theses requirements of other majors.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (FLM3050 And FLM3025 ) Or (FLM3610 And FLM3620 )

Department: Film

Students work under faculty supervision in the field on student-generated documentary productions.

Credits: 2

Department: Film

Film/Video Production

Description:

Minor in Film/Video Production

The minor in film/video production is designed for students who want to integrate production skills with their major. After completing two foundation courses in screenwriting and basic digital production, students take specialized courses in narrative and documentary, or experimental filmmaking. The final capstone course allows students to spend an entire semester developing a single film project of their choice.

Students should have attained sophomore status (or completed a total of 32 credits) before signing up for this minor. It is ideal for students who are interested in pursuing a senior project that involves a film or video.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Film/Video Production

Five courses, as follows:

  • FLM 1050/Introduction to Digital Filmmaking
  • PSW 1010/Screenwriting I
  • One of the following two-course sequences:
    • FLM 3025/Documentary Filmmaking and FLM 3050/Directing the Scene
    • FLM 3460/Documentary Workshop and 3620/Experimental Workshop
  • FLM 4010/Short Film Production


Additional elective courses:
CIN 2200/Music Video and Popular Culture
CIN 2500/Principles of Montage
CIN 3040/Film Sound: Technique and Theory
NME 3010/Cross-Cultural Video Production
PSW 3120/The Writer and the Documentary
PSW 3400/The TV Writer’s Room
PSW 3500/Writing the Web Series

For course descriptions, go to:
CIN prefix: Cinema Studies
FLM prefix: Film
NME prefix: New Media
PSW prefix: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Notes:

  • CIN 1100, being replaced in fall 2018 by FLM 3050, satisfies the requirement for FLM 3050.
  • COM 1400/Introduction to Video Techniques and Technology, offered by the School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education, may be taken in lieu of FLM 1050.
  • COM 3320/Documentary Production, offered by the School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education, may be taken in lieu of FLM 3025.

Media Studies

Description:

In the media studies program, students learn how to combine cultural theory, critical cultural production, and do-it-yourself (DIY) aesthetics to explore the roles that media technologies and the arts play in everyday life.

Creative practices are approached historically and ethnographically, and considered within their rich cultural, geographic, and political economic contexts. This includes students’ own low-cost, open-ended, and tactical DIY productions, such as mashup advertisements, sound installations, and performance art—practices of experimentation, protest, and speculation that engage contemporary social concerns.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, students majoring in media studies must complete a minimum of 10–11 courses with a grade of C or higher and an 8-credit senior project (40 credits minimum total) as follows:

  1. MSA 1050/Introduction to Media Studies (3 credits)
  2. MSA 2200/Media Institutions and Forms (3 credits)
  3. MSA 3400/Critical Perspectives on Media, Society, and the Arts (4 credits)
  4. MSA 3450/Research Methods in Media, Society, and the Arts (4 credits)
  5. Three electives (at least 9 credits total)
  6. One course in art history (visual or performing) or media history (at least 3 credits)
  7. Two or three courses in studio art and/or media production (at least 6 credits total)
  8. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I (4 credits)
  9. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II (4 credits)

New courses may be added to the following lists. Students should consult their advisor to determine whether a course not on these lists fulfills the elective requirement.

Anthropology (School of Natural & Social Sciences):
ANT 2175/Language, Culture, and Society
ANT 2250/Film and Anthropology
ANT 2320/Performing Arts in Cross-Cultural Perspective
ANT 2340/Drugs, Bodies, Design
ANT 2470/Museum Anthropology
ANT 2555/Magic, Witchcraft, and Modernity
ANT 2610/Introduction to Ethnomusicology
ANT 2730/New Black Ethnographies
ANT 3185/Global Media, Local Cultures
ANT 3345/Media and Performance in Africa
ANT 3350/Myth, Ritual, and Performance
ANT 3380/Avant-Garde Cultures and Everyday Life
ANT 3410/Anthropology of Art and Aesthetics
ANT 3415/Anthropology of Sound and Listening
ANT 3540/Sensing and Knowing in Anthropology, Psychology, and the Arts
Cinema Studies:
CIN 3000/Cinema and Revolution
CIN 3030/Documentary Film and Theory
CIN 3060/Cult Cinema
CIN 3070/Television Studies
CIN 3200/Film, Media, and War Machines
CIN 3330/Genres of Affect
CIN 3500/Cinema in the Internet Age
CIN 3540/Queer Cinema
Media Studies:
MSA 2210/Transhumanist Media (added Spring 2018)
MSA 2235/Computers and Culture
MSA 2450/Sounds of Protest
MSA 3150/Outsider Art
MSA 3160/Queer Media Convergence
MSA 3350/The Body: Medium and Message
MSA 4110/Lively Geographies
MSA 4160/Material Cultures
MSA 4750/Special Topics in Media, Society, and the Arts
Literature (School of Humanities):
LIT 2195/Italian American Literature and Popular Culture
New Media:
NME 2250/Art and Technology
NME 3010/Cross-Cultural Video Production
NME 3040/Internet as Public Art
Philosophy (School of Humanities):
PHI 2780/Philosophy of Art: From Plato to Postmodernism
PHI 3275/Light and Truth: Film, Photography, and Reality
PHI 3610/Frankfurt School Critical Theory
PHI 3716/Philosophy and Film
PHI 3785/Art and Morality
Sociology (School of Natural and Social Sciences):
SOC 2105/Art and Outsiderness
SOC 3005/Feminism, Art, and Performance
Theatre and Performance (Conservatory of Theatre Arts):
THP 3120/Gameplay and Performance
THP 3130/Transmedia and Performance
THP 3250/Theories of Drama and Performance

Minor requirements:

The minor in media studies is designed to provide students with a broad knowledge and understanding of theories and methods of analysis of media and the arts, while at the same time allowing for skill development in an art form.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the Chair of the media studies program.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Media Studies

  1. MSA 1050/Introduction to Media Studies (3 credits)
  2. Three electives; at least two of these must be taught by faculty in the Media Studies Board of Study (9–12 credits)
  3. At least 4 credits in studio art and/or media production courses

Faculty

  • Professor of Anthropology
    Director of Natural and Social Sciences
    • BA, Yale University
    • MIA, Columbia University
    • PhD, Stanford University
  • Professor of Media Studies and Anthropology
    • BA, University of Chicago
    • MA, New School for Social Research
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Stony Brook University, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Grinnell College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Associate Professor of Media Studies and Anthropology
    • BA, Hampshire College
    • MA, University of Washington
    • PhD, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Media Studies
    • BA, Hunter College, City University of New York
    • MS, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
    • PhD, Ohio University

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BA, Brown University
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Professor of Sociology
    • BA, MA, University of New Orleans
    • PhD, New School for Social Research
  • Associate Professor of New Media and Graphic Design
    • BS, MS, Middle East Technical University (Turkey)
    • MA, PhD, New School for Social Research
  • Associate Professor of Anthropology
    • BA, Trinity College
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, Columbia University
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology
    • MA , Brooklyn College
    • MPhil,Goldsmiths College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin

Courses

An introduction to theories of the media, visual, and performing arts. Using semiotics as a point of departure, students explore the language and iconography of visual communication. The course focuses on works of art, advertising, television, and the web as social contexts of cultural production and analyses the role that ordinary people play in the production of media.

Credits: 3

Department: Media Studies

An examination of media forms (e.g., postcards, radio, TV, internet, mobile media technologies) and media institutions (e.g., movie studios, marketing and advertising companies, regulatory agencies) within historical and cultural contexts. Students explore the multiple ways that human engagements with the world are mediated and how media forms contribute to the production of social norms, practices, and senses of identity and community.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: Media Studies

Students focus on how humans are represented and configured across media platforms, how the self is culturally constructed, and how technology continually redefines the meaning of “human.” The class also considers what these figurations indicate about contemporary political subjectivities, gender identities, and species belonging. The work of notable thinkers, including William Gibson, Masamune Shiroh, Stellarc, and Spike Jonze, is studied.

Credits: 3

Department: Media Studies

Examines the connections between computers and culture, with a critical look at how computers may be changing and shaping culture, and how culture affects people’s use and understanding of computers. The course focuses in particular on the ways in which gender, race, and class affect people’s experiences with and understanding of computers. Both work and leisure uses of computers are considered.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: Media Studies

Examines cultural representations of poverty, work, and wealth in American popular culture. Students consider how mediated narratives of class conflict reflect and reinforce divisions between social classes (the 99 and 1%) and within them (immigrants and “white working class”). Students develop a deeper appreciation of how class “works” as an economic and political system, and how it is lived.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: Media Studies

In 1991, The Real World pioneered a genre of “unscripted” television that reshaped national media culture, culminating in the reality of the 2016 election. Students study theories of Hall, Habermas and Gramsci to explore how the genre reflects and shapes attitudes of U.S. audiences to surveillance, class conflict, and the performance of truths. Examples include Jersey Shore and American Idol.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 Or MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: Media Studies

Media convergence refers to large-scale changes in the ownership and production of media content, as well as the role that audiences and consumers have in its development. This course examines media convergence from the perspectives of queer theory and history, and asks how queer identities, sensibilities, styles, and practices both shape and are shaped by media convergence.

Credits: 4

Department: Media Studies

An intensive examination of critical and theoretical work on media, society, and the arts. Classic and contemporary theories (e.g., Marxism, structuralism, organizational and cultural production, various cultural studies approaches) and topics (e.g., hegemony, cultural capital, high vs. low culture, elite and commercialized culture) are explored.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (MSA1050 Or NME1050 ) And MSA2200

Department: Media Studies

Ethnography, one of the key methodological innovations of anthropology, is used in this course to examine life in a media-saturated world. Focusing on an emergent ethnographic literature that examines the relationships between mass media, popular culture, and social and technological networking, the course situates everyday interactions with media within broader theoretical, historical, and cultural contexts.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (MSA1050 Or NME1050 ) And MSA2200

Department: Media Studies

Students look at forms of production and exchange in various contexts throughout the world that are alternatives to dominant, formal economies. These include trash picking and trash art-making, piracy and counterfeiting, independent farming, and alternative banking. Students consider the notion of value in a variety of ways and trace how production, exchange, circulation, and consumption elaborate new forms of social life.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (MSA1050 Or NME1050 ) Or ANT1500 Or CAN1500

Department: Media Studies

Focuses on the histories, politics, and aesthetics of drag. Students engage a variety of work in gender and queer studies, and they also learn how to do drag through a series of practice-based workshops.

Credits: 4

Department: Media Studies

The topics, which vary, are selected from among the special interests of faculty.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: Media Studies

New Media

Description:

The New Media B.A. Program at Purchase College offers an interdisciplinary curriculum that lies at the intersection of art, society, and technology. Students study the effects of digital media from multiple perspectives, giving them the tools to be well-rounded citizens in an increasingly complex society and allowing them to develop their own voice through guided research and hands-on production.

In this program students learn about current technology and acquire the knowledge and skills needed to understand forthcoming technologies, not least in relation to key social and historical contexts. The program’s strong liberal arts component provides students with critical and conceptual frameworks which, when combined with the acquisition of practical skills, help to prepare them for the workforce and/or graduate study.

Courses are drawn from the visual and performing arts, computer science, the social sciences, and other liberal arts disciplines. Students majoring in New Media are offered a structured, well-rounded foundation covering a range of methodologies and content areas, with analysis and production often present within the same course. Collaboration is particularly encouraged, as are experimental and creative approaches to media production and distribution. Each semester the New Media program and the Neuberger Museum of Art co-host a series of lectures and workshops by accomplished artists, technologists, and theorists in the field of new media.

Advanced Standing and the Senior Project

After applying for and receiving advanced standing, new media majors pursue a program of upper-level study designed by the student. This provides students with the opportunity to pursue individual interests while at the same time developing a focus in new media. As part of this program of study, all students are expected to complete an 8-credit senior project, which is supervised by a faculty member of the New Media Board of Study. Various types of senior projects are acceptable, and collaboration among students is encouraged.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all new media majors must complete the following requirements (64–71 credits):

Freshman and Sophomore Years (Foundation): 30–31 credits

Students must earn a grade of C+ or higher in each of these courses. Those who earn a grade lower than a C+ must petition the New Media Board of Study to retake the course. To pass NME 2100, students must attain at least a 2.67 (B-) GPA in the foundation courses. In any given semester, students should not enroll in more than three foundation courses and we recommend against taking more than two studio or lab courses.

  1. PHO 1100/Introduction to Digital Photography: 4 credits
  2. MSA 1050/Introduction to Media Studies: 3 credits
  3. NME 1060/Introduction to Sound: 3 credits
  4. NME 1160/Design Principles: 4 credits
  5. NME 1450/Programming for Visual Artists: 4 credits or MAT 1520/Computer Science I
  6. One 2000-level technoculture course (3–4 credits), chosen from the following or approved by the student’s faculty advisor; it should be taken after MSA 1050 has been successfully completed: – MSA 2235/Computers and Culture – NME 2250/Art and Technology
  7. NME 2420/Video Art I: 4 credits
  8. NME 2750/Introduction to the Web: 4 credits
  9. NME 2100/New Media Advanced Standing: 1 credit

New media majors typically apply for advanced standing in their fourth or fifth semester, while concurrently completing the courses required in the first two years of study. A student may be in the process of fulfilling a maximum of two foundation courses concurrent with advanced standing. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of the new media program, it is important that students be strongly focused and self-directed. Therefore, the transition to advanced standing is taken very seriously by the New Media faculty.

In order to have a clear picture of each student’s preparedness, the department requests that each student submit materials for review. This advanced-standing website must be submitted two weeks before the beginning of registration for the following semester. Students register for NME 2100/New Media Advanced Standing, and are assigned a faculty member who will be their Advanced Standing Advisor to help them navigate the process. A series of workshops are also provided by staff to help with any technical issues.

To apply for advanced standing, each student must build a website consisting of:

  1. a portfolio of work, which shall be presented on the student’s webpage
  2. a written discussion of the student’s development to date (this two- to four-page document shall include a discussion of courses completed or in progress, projects undertaken, and recent life experiences that have led to the current proposal)
  3. a proposed academic program that the student intends to follow until graduation (this two- to four-page proposal shall include a list of all courses that the student plans to take in his or her remaining semesters, the general area of the intended senior project, and an indication of what projects and internships the student will develop to prepare for a successful senior year)
Please note: The New Media Board of Study reviews the website and determines whether the student receives advanced standing. Advanced standing is a prerequisite for many of the upper-level courses that constitute the major. It is possible to retake Advanced Standing a second time the following semester, but students must speak with their advisor and the New Media chair before reapplying. Students who are ultimately not approved for advanced standing will need to complete their BA in a different major.

After Passing Advance Standing

Refer to Applying for Advanced Standing for detailed information. After being accepted for advanced study, requirements are as outlined below. Students must earn a grade of C+ or higher in each of these courses, excluding the senior project.

  • one upper-level history/theory course: 3–4 credits
  • one anthropology/sociology course: 3–4 credits
  • four elective courses chosen for their relevance and applicability to the student’s course of study in new media: 12–16 credits
  • and the synthesis courses, taken in the junior and senior years (16 credits, plus an optional internship):
    1. NME 3880/Junior Seminar in New Media: 4 credits
    2. NME 3995/Internship in New Media (optional): variable credits
    3. NME 4880/Senior Seminar I in New Media: 2 credits
    4. NME 4890/Senior Seminar II in New Media: 2 credits
    5. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
    6. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

ARH 3405/Design History and Theory: 1750–Today: 4 credits
ARH 3531/New Media and Contemporary Art: 4 credits
CIN 3200/Film, Media, and War Machines: 4 credits
DES 3240/Design Issues: 3 credits
DES 3300/History of Graphic Design Survey: 4 credits
NME 3040/Internet as Public Art: 4 credits
MTH 4120/History of Recorded Music I: 2 credits
MTH 4130/History of Recorded Music II: 2 credits
VIS 3000/Art in the Age of Electronic Media: 3 credits

The following list includes courses offered by the media studies program and by the School of Art+Design.

ANT 2320/Performing Arts in Cross-Cultural Perspective: 3 credits
ANT 3185/Global Media, Local Cultures: 4 credits
ANT 3345/Media and Performance in Africa: 4 credits
ANT 3410/Anthropology of Art and Aesthetics: 4 credits
MSA 3160/Queer Media Convergence: 4 credits
MSA 3400/Critical Perspectives on Media, Society, and the Arts: 4 credits
MSA 4750/Special Topics in Media, Society, and the Arts: 4 credits
VIS 3500/The Arts for Social Change: 3 credits

Courses in the following lists are subject to change, and new courses may be added. Students should consult with their faculty advisor when choosing electives.

New Media
NME 2470/Drawing, Moving, and Seeing with Code
NME 3010/Cross-Cultural Video Production
NME 3050/Information Aesthetics
NME 3150/Material Distribution: Billboards, Wheatpaste, and Pamphlets
NME 3170/Digital Design and Fabrication
NME 3210/Tactical Practical
NME 3215/New Directions in Virtual Space
NME 3220/Forms of the Moving Image
NME 3230/Real-Time Media Processing
NME 3265/Social Design
NME 3340/Photography Expanded
NME 3350/Digital Printmaking
NME 3430/Video Graphics
NME 3455/Dark Ecology Studio
NME 3545/Community-Centered Media
NME 3560/Introduction to Physical Computing: Getting Outside the Box
NME 3675/Copy, Paste
NME 3720/Interactive Installation: Hacking the Everyday
NME 3770/Experimental Web Practice
NME 4150/Special Projects in Tiny Computing

Film:
FLM 3610/Experimental Workshop (Part One)
FLM 3620/Experimental Workshop (Part Two)

Mathematics/Computer Science (School of Natural & Social Sciences):
MAT 1420/Programming Games
MAT 3146/Scripting for the Web
MAT 3440/Creating User Interfaces
MAT 3530/Creating Databases for Web Applications
MAT 3540/Social Software
MAT 3650/Networking and Security
MAT 3670/Robotics
MAT 3755/Mobile Computing
MAT 3765/Mobile Media

School of the Arts:

Studio Composition (Conservatory of Music):
MCO 1310/Studio Composition I
MCO 1320/Studio Composition II
MCO 2310/MIDI Composition I
MCO 2320/MIDI Composition II
MCO 3330/Studio Production I
MCO 3340/Studio Production II
MCO 4350/Digital Audio I
MCO 4360/Digital Audio II

Theatre and Performance (Conservatory of Theatre Arts):
THP 3120/Gameplay and Performance

School of Art+Design:
DES 3090/Interactive Design
DES 3190/Motion Graphics for Designers
DES 4170/Advanced Web Design: Special Projects
PRT 3000/The Animated Print
SCP 3155/Performance Art
SCP 3310/Digital Dimensions
SCP 3420/Video Art II
SCP 3630/Sound/Interactive Media I
SCP 3640/Sound/Interactive Media II

Faculty

  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BA, Brown University
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Assistant Professor of New Media
    Digital Photography Instructional Support Specialist
    • BFA, MFA, Parsons the New School for Design
  • Lecturer, New Media
    • BA, Cornell University
    • MFA, University of London
  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BFA, Nova Scotia College of Art & Design
    • MFA, University of California, Berkeley
  • Lecturer in New Media
    • BFA, Cooper Union
  • Lecturer in New Media
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of New Media and Computer Science
    • BA, Brandeis University
    • MFA, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Assistant Professor of New Media
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, Transart Institute, University of Plymouth (UK)
  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BFA, San Francisco Art Institute
    • MFA, University of California, Davis
  • Assistant Professor of New Media
    • BA, Tufts University
    • BFA, School of the Museum of Fine Arts
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Associate Professor of New Media
    • BA, Wesleyan University
    • MFA, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Lecturer in New Media
    New Media Technician
    • BFA, Icelandic College of Art and Crafts (Reykjavik)
    • MFA, Concordia University (Montreal)
  • Associate Professor of New Media and Graphic Design
    • BS, MS, Middle East Technical University (Turkey)
    • MA, PhD, New School for Social Research

Contributing Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Sculpture
    • BA, Bates College
    • MFA, School of Visual Arts
  • Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Grinnell College
    • PhD, University of Texas, Austin
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Studies
    • BA, Stony Brook University, SUNY
    • MA, PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Lecturer of Sculpture
    • BFA, Pratt Institute
    • MPS, New York University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • MA, PhD, Stanford University
  • Professor Emerita of Mathematics/Computer Science
    • SB, University of Chicago
    • MA, Columbia University
    • PhD, New York University
  • Associate Professor of Art History
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MA, University of Iowa
    • PhD, University of Southern California

Courses

An introductory survey of music, theatre, and dance in Western and non-Western cultures, including the relationships between music and religion, dance and weddings, theatre and curing. The course also explores the performing arts as aesthetic phenomena in their own right. Live performances by non-Western performers and optional field trips are planned.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: ANT1500 Or MSA1050 Or NME1050

Department: New Media

An examination of contemporary art outside of the traditional media of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Looking at painting-based performances of the 1950s, feminist body art, guerrilla television, and current political interventions based in digital media, students identify the strategies artists used to create new forms, and assess their success in modifying our understanding of the world.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: New Media

An advanced seminar on theories of cinematic and computational media via “the war machine.” Focus is on the relationship between cinematic and military techniques and technologies—what Virilio dubbed “the deadly harmony” between eye and weapon. Emphasis is also placed on the sociopolitics of code, the ramifications of informatic capture and the formation of coded bodies, and the rise of new machines of war and resistance.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

A focused inquiry into the process of designing for, and the creation of, interactive platforms for the purposes of entertainment, persuasion, recreation, and/or human enrichment where the viewer is an active participant. This course is an intensive investigation into considerations surrounding interactive, or experience-oriented, design spaces, and samples supplemental readings from sociology, anthropology, and game theory. You will be required to work collaboratively to pursue concepts through a series of physical and digital investigations.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (DES2460 And DES3510 ) And DES3200

Department: New Media

Builds on the principles and skills of time-based and interactive design introduced in DES 2460. Technique, theory, and practice are further explored through projects using time, on-screen spatiality, transition, kinetic typography, narrative, and sound. Projects address linear and nonlinear environments such as film and television titling, DVD menus, web splash pages, and graphics for mobile devices.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: DES2460 Or VDE2460

Department: New Media

A combined lecture/studio course that examines ethical and social issues in contemporary artistic production and design. The goal is to develop active research about such urgent issues as ecology, body politics and gender, race and urban justice, and human rights, with respect to new futures. Projects incorporate art installations, visualizations, websites, performances, and public campaigns by focusing on creative public engagement.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME2100 Or (DES2600 And DES2460 )

Department: New Media

Focuses on print communication, primarily graphic design, in the Western world from the late 19th century to the present. A brief summary of important historical precedents launches a chronological series of lectures on significant movements and individuals and the economic, political, and technological developments that have influenced modern and contemporary print communication.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

An introduction to problem solving, using computers. Emphasis is on programming, including the study of syntax, semantics, logical structures, graphics, and object-oriented programming. General topics of algorithm development, formulating problems, finding methods for computer solutions, differences among computer languages, and trends in the industry are also discussed. Experience is acquired through hands-on labs and several programming assignments.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

Building on the programming introduction in the prerequisite course, students learn about scripting for websites, including HTML, JavaScript, CSS, and php. Topics include the use of cookies, localStorage, video/audio, geolocation, an application program interface such as the Google Maps API, responsive design, and accessibility. Comparisons are made between scripting and compiled languages and client versus server computing.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAT1520 Or NME1450 Or MAT1540

Department: New Media

Introduces concepts and skills used in analyzing and designing interfaces for computer applications. As students study techniques and “rules of thumb,” they discover that the design and implementation of each interface is a unique challenge, which requires creativity and consideration of technical, aesthetic, and psychological factors. Includes the use of XML, XSL, XHTML-MP, VoiceXML, and usability studies.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAT1520 Or NME1520

Department: New Media

Covers the key conceptual and practical aspects of networking and security, which are increasingly important in the era of the internet, Windows, and Unix. TCP/IP communications protocols are explored at multiple levels of the protocol stack. Performance and reliability issues are also studied, using campus intranet and internet connections as well as protocol analyzer and network management tools. Security topics include encryption, authentication, and the likely change from clear-text to Kereberos-type tools.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAT1520 Or NME1520

Department: New Media

An introduction to theories of the media, visual, and performing arts. Using semiotics as a point of departure, students explore the language and iconography of visual communication. The course focuses on works of art, advertising, television, and the web as social contexts of cultural production and analyses the role that ordinary people play in the production of media.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media

Examines the connections between computers and culture, with a critical look at how computers may be changing and shaping culture, and how culture affects people’s use and understanding of computers. The course focuses in particular on the ways in which gender, race, and class affect people’s experiences with and understanding of computers. Both work and leisure uses of computers are considered.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: New Media

Media convergence refers to large-scale changes in the ownership and production of media content, as well as the role that audiences and consumers have in its development. This course examines media convergence from the perspectives of queer theory and history, and asks how queer identities, sensibilities, styles, and practices both shape and are shaped by media convergence.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

A hands-on, introductory audio class in which students learn how to use sound in practical and creative ways, in three phases of production: acquisition, manipulation, and reproduction. Students also learn some of the history of artists and makers who use sound as their medium, as well of some of the technical and theoretical aspects of how sound is created and perceived.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media

A hands-on introduction to the language of design and design principles with emphasis on composition, color, and type. Software for vector image creation is taught alongside understanding the full design process, from visual research to beta testing. Print output is introduced, although the focus is on screen-based media.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

Using a visual environment that provides immediate feedback, students are taught the basic principles of programming and, by extension, math. Lectures focus on key aspects of programming and how working artists use code creatively in their practice. In this course, math is never the end but rather the means to problem-solve during the creative process.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

Students take this course in the semester that they apply for Advance Standing. Grading is on a pass/no credit basis. Advanced Standing is a portfolio review that asks students to present work from the broad range of foundation classes they have taken. After applying for and receiving Advanced Standing, New Media majors pursue a program of upper-level study in which they may pursue a broad range of individual interests.

Credits: 1

Department: New Media

Examines the interplay between new art forms and technologies from early modernism through today. Focusing on how the two fields have developed in relation to each other, the course addresses two questions: what is the relationship between technology, technique, and art, and how has it changed over time? This is both an art survey course and a study of related philosophical questions.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: New Media

An introduction to video as a creative visual, auditory, and spatial medium. Students learn the fundamentals of video production with the goal of making original work in the genres of single-channel tape, performance, and installation. At the same time, students are introduced to key works in the history of time-based arts in a weekly thematic program of viewing, listening, reading, and critique.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1010 Or NME1100 Or NME1060 Or VIS1330

Department: New Media

An intermediate lecture/studio course that explores techniques for creating dynamic, poetic, and lifelike animations in code. Students learn techniques to program movement and the simulation of natural systems and behaviors, and develop works that respond to various inputs. Projects are developed using open-source software environments like Processing and p5.js.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: VIS1450 Or MAT1520 Or NME1450 Or NME1520 Or MAT1420 Or NME1420

Department: New Media

An exploration of the ways in which various media technologies promote investment and disinvestment in history, community, and tradition. This course pursues the argument that technology does not derive from, but creates the fundamental structures of human experience, affecting people socially, politically, psychologically, and neurologically. Primary authors include Plato, Kant, Marx, Freud, Heidegger, Derrida, Stiegler, and Malabou.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1050 Or MSA1050

Department: New Media

Students gain a solid understanding of website creation, using HTML and Cascading Style Sheets. Scripting languages and libraries are also introduced to create more advanced interactions or animations. Along with technical skills, students learn web design fundamentals and how artists have used and even served as authors of the web since its inception.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1160

Department: New Media

Students collaborate with students in other cultures, using the Internet to produce videos on subjects of mutual interest. Because the focus is on developing a cross-cultural dialogue, basic video production experience is expected. Before moving to video, the two groups collaboratively write fiction. During the semester, they meet in video conferences with their peers abroad to discuss their productions. Previous semesters have included collaborations with students at universities in Belarus, Turkey, Mexico, Germany, and Lithuania.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

A growing dialogue surrounding internet art echoes the rhetoric of community-oriented art practices and public art movements of the past. Topics include an introduction to the history of public art; current internet art practice and theory; how networks can serve physical situations or communities, rather than being a purely screen-based phenomenon; policies that are shaping the functionality of the internet; and new artistic possibilities that arise as ubiquitous computing integrates with public space.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

A hands-on examination of what it means to live in an information age. Students learn to make sense—and sometimes, new meaning—of data through creative visualizations. The course considers audience together with the politics of information and the persuasion of the visual.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1160

Department: New Media

Examines how contemporary artists and activists are using print media to communicate ideas in public spaces. The course also more generally considers how printed matter has been used to expand popular consciousness since the invention of the printing press. Students produce their own print interventions for public spaces and incorporate digital media to sustain interaction.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Focuses on the relationship between digitally aided production processes and traditional techniques of drawing and object building. Emphasis is placed on the fabrication of objects and prints in multiples that interact with physical space and the body. Students are also encouraged to develop their own drawing tools and initiate ideas around making with new media technologies.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

The first rule of guerrilla warfare is to know the terrain. Today’s terrain is one of symbols, media spectacles, and technology that artists are uniquely equipped to navigate. In this course, students learn to combine sociological research, communications strategy, technological methods, and artistic tactics to plan effective social interventions. Students should bring their passion, thoughtfulness, compassion, and planning skills.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Focuses on establishing a broad understanding of the 3-D game engine Unity and a critical understanding of the discourse surrounding modern virtual environments. Students are encouraged to deviate from traditional 3-D games, bringing content and forms of storytelling from other areas of interest. Artists and texts that examine our cultural fascination with the virtual are presented in class. Students are introduced to Unity and to the programming language C#, but some prior programming experience is expected.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME1450 Or MAT1520

Department: New Media

Students explore the various ways that artists distribute and present video and the moving image. Examining issues of audience, the physical experience, and the social aspects of media distribution, this course focuses on the life of video after it is rendered. Topics include video installation, the moving image online, live video performance, and video remixes and re-edits.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Using Pure Data, an open-source, graphical programming environment, students experiment with real-time media processing while exploring conceptual concerns and implications through historical and theoretical readings. Students are encouraged to explore personal experiments integrating these conceptual ideas into projects that may include algorithmic or interactive audio performances, screen-based visuals, or interaction with physical devices.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Focusing on specialized topics in new media, students work closely with faculty to explore new areas of their practice and research. Students develop projects in particular area of specialization. The curriculum will vary in relation to the faculty member’s practice and research.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

What does it mean to be a photographer in the age of ubiquitous imaging technologies (e.g., cellphones, surveillance cameras, satellites, and drones), social media, and online image databases? Students explore questions related to the status of photography, consider interdisciplinary approaches using emerging technologies (including online platforms, laser cutters, and drones), and work collaboratively in a studio-based environment.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: PHO1100 Or NME1010

Department: New Media

An introduction to fine art digital printing and contemporary digital photography. Students expand their two-dimensional image-making skills while developing their artistic vision through the creation of a cohesive body of print-based work. Topics concerning the importance of contemporary photography are discussed in class through lectures and presentations. Students are expected to combine contemporary ideas with the rigor of printing quality images.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

An advanced workshop for highly motivated students who have expressed interest and fluency in time-based video work. The class is devoted to the production of various independent video projects, culminating in a thesis project; in addition, students do multiple presentations focusing on situating their work within historical and contemporary contexts. A wide variety of time-based artworks are explored, including single-channel, multi-channel, and video installation work. Students are expected to have competency with digital video cameras, sound, and editing techniques.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (SCP2420 Or VSC2420 ) Or NME2420 And NME2100

Department: New Media

An exploration of the ways that graphic techniques can be used by video artists, animators, and designers in their work. Through lectures and presentations, students are exposed to the work of artists who use a variety of approaches, from abstract animation to kinetic text and transformation of live-action video. Students learn about key framing, matting, compositing, working in 3-D spaces, and other computer-based video processes. A special emphasis is placed on issues in contemporary video art, and the ways in which video graphics are used to explore these ideas.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Students expand their video production skills while increasing their knowledge of the history and theory of video and performance art. In solo and collaborative assignments, students create projects that grow out of class discussions. Topics include relationships between live, remote, virtual, public, and private performance; action and document; sets and sculptural objects; autobiography and use of the body; and politics of the camera. Contemporary video performance is situated in the context of the history of photographic media as well as contemporary new-media tools and practices.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2420

Department: New Media

People are entangled in a dark ecology, in which humans, marshes, car parks, and foreign rubber plantations are all intimately connected. Students explore methods of investigation drawn from both scientific and artistic modes of inquiry, such as mapping, poetic and scientific sensing, visualization, and photography. How can public interventions shift how individuals perceive and represent their deep connections to environmental systems?

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1450 Or MAT1520

Department: New Media

Student groups are paired with local organizations with which they work throughout the semester. After site visits, interviews, and research, students identify a specific problem or need that they can address through media art production. Students learn about the inner workings and critical impact of participating organizations while helping to envision and implement change through creative thinking and technical know-how.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Students break down the physical barrier of the personal computer and bring computing into the “real” world. The main tool used for this purpose is the Arduino, an open-source micro-controller popular with artists and makers. Students are introduced to theories of game design (both historical and modern) and apply them to their class projects; the course also explores the societal implications of building and programming and repurposing personal electronics, and examines artists and makers who have used physical computing for creative expression.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (NME1420 Or MAT1420 ) Or (NME1520 Or MAT1520 )

Department: New Media

The ease with which digital tools allow people to copy, paste, and recombine creative work challenges long-held ideas about originality and creativity. In this combined studio/lecture course, students examine the theory and history of appropriation, sampling, quotation, and reuse in the arts, while simultaneously creating their own multidisciplinary works that engage with contemporary ideas related to these issues.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

Considers how artists have traditionally managed interactive spaces and how new technologies expand and shift the meaning of interactivity in contemporary art. “Circuit bending,” an approach to electronics that repurposes older machines and toys, is also introduced. Students create their own interactive artworks; emphasis is on nontraditional uses of materials. Arduino microcontrollers and the Processing open-source platform are demonstrated in class and available to students.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

The internet is examined as a tool for artistic expression and action. Students consider what is unique about the internet; exploit its potential as a means for communication, distribution, simulation, and interaction; and experiment with web production. A wide range of internet art projects are studied to stimulate ideas and give students an understanding of what is happening in the “net art” world. Students are expected to challenge standard notions of how the web functions.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2730 Or MAT3730

Department: New Media

A hands-on examination of how digital games can go beyond pure entertainment and be used as a means for educating people about important social and global issues. Students work on Web-based Flash games, social networking games, or mobile games that are conceptualized, designed, and developed to effect change.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

Students develop a definition of new media through a range of learning experiences. These include a survey of work in the field, with guest artists and class trips to galleries, media production houses, and events; students’ critical writing and interactive discussions about what they are experiencing; and teacher-structured and student-initiated collaborative projects in which students test different creative roles, using various media.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: NME2100

Department: New Media

Students create custom projects using inexpensive, bank card–sized computers for art installations and works for the public good. In the process, their knowledge of text-based interfaces, free culture, collaboration, circuit building, and the history of creative computing/hacking is deepened.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: NME1450 Or MAT1420 Or MAT1520

Department: New Media

Students meet weekly to discuss some of the seminal texts in new media and to make presentations on their senior project proposals. By the end of the semester, each student has a website describing his or her project and a working timeline.

Credits: 2

Department: New Media

Students meet weekly to develop their senior projects further, design the new media exhibition, and practice writing proposals to external organizations and preparing their résumés.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: NME4880

Department: New Media

An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of digital photography. Exposure, composition, color, retouching, resolution, and preparation of image files for on-screen and print use are among the techniques covered. Assignments include both technical and aesthetic concerns.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

Students explore the effect of landscapes and surroundings in Pisciotta, Italy, and develop their personal vision by observing and leveraging those landscapes and translating their experiences into powerful images. Working with digital cameras (a simple one is fine), students create a personal photographic essay, depicting what they see through the lens of their surroundings.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

In this digital fabrication course, students explore the relationship between the three-dimensional world and digital technology. In this creative new-media environment, students are given a foundation for developing 3-D content and integrating it into their preferred field. Students generate digital objects, prepare them for real-world fabrication, and create virtual-reality simulations and photorealistic sculpture proposals. This course will utilize laser-cutters, CNC router and 3D printers.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: VIS1260 Or NME2100

Department: New Media

Sound is explored as material in the context of the visual arts, using DAT recorders, sampling, synthesis, processing, computers, sensor control, and MIDI systems. Projects may include making sonic instruments, sounding objects, and experimental video; ambient, interactive, performative, and multimedia installations; and surround-sound DVDs. Advanced technological means enable uncharted explorations in the time-based arts.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media

A continuation of SCP 3630, for advanced sound and multimedia projects. Sound is further explored in ambient, interactive, performative, time-based, and site-specific installations. Tools available include the Kurzwell K2600 Architectural Synthesis System and Macintosh computers with mixing, synthesis, and DVD surround-sound mastering technology. Interactive programs in the studio include MAX, Jitter, and Cyclops.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (SCP3630 Or VSC3630 ) Or NME3630

Department: New Media

Explores the genre of alternate reality or pervasive gaming currently used as an alternative to traditional performance by contemporary theatrical and visual artists, dancers, and musicians. The blurring distinctions between game and narrative are examined, opening new possibilities for performance. Students design and stage their own live alternate-reality game as a means of storytelling or extend an existing narrative through transmedia.

Credits: 4

Department: New Media

An overview of electronic media and its relationship to the fine arts. This course covers the genre from its infancy to the present and focuses on the study of the art and artists critical to the genre’s development. Lectures, hands-on demonstrations, and visiting artists are augmented by assigned readings, critical writing, and examinations.

Credits: 3

Department: New Media

Playwriting and Screenwriting

Description:

Professional writers increasingly work in multiple modes of expression. In the playwriting and screenwriting BA program at Purchase College, students learn to write for both the stage and the screen through studies that engage with these disciplines at the introductory through advanced level. After the foundation courses, writers can choose to continue to study both playwriting and screenwriting or to focus exclusively on one craft.

The curriculum helps students develop a sophisticated eye and gain a deeper understanding of the art and craft involved in making theatre and film. Being at Purchase means a professional approach—working alongside talented film and theatre majors, actors, theatre designers, musicians, visual artists, and dancers in a world-renowned artistic community few other schools can provide. The college’s proximity to New York City provides a distinct advantage: students are taught by industry professionals and have access to all the culture and excitement the city has to offer, and to theatre, film, and television production facilities for their studies and internships. The affordability of Purchase is vital to the economic freedom needed in pursuing a career as a dramatic writer.

The program includes required and elective courses in playwriting and screenwriting; theatre and film history; writing for television, new media, and documentaries; and directing for both stage and screen. Because playwriting and screenwriting are performance arts, students are encouraged to present their work to an audience as much as possible. In their final year, students work with a faculty mentor to develop a substantial senior project: a full-length play, feature-length screenplay, teleplay, or documentary script. Other courses provide the student with portfolio materials in the form of writing samples, both on the page and short works on the screen.

This BA program also provides a solid foundation in the liberal arts, with majors required to complete a minor in a non-theater/film related field of study. This still leaves plenty of room for students to explore other interests, including study abroad programs—all of which enriches their sensibilities as dramatic writers.

The program also offers a minor in playwriting and a minor in screenwriting, open to students in all disciplines.

Note for Transfer Students

Students interested in transferring from another school into this BA program and earning the degree in four semesters (entering as a junior) should be aware that they must have already taken:

  • introductory screenwriting
  • introductory playwriting
  • at least one semester of either theatre or cinema history (recommended)

Junior transfers must register for PSW 2000 and 2010 in their first semester.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all playwriting and screenwriting majors must meet the following requirements (54 credits):

Foundation courses: 23 credits

  1. PSW 1000/Playwriting I: 4 credits*
  2. PSW 1010/Screenwriting I: 4 credits*
  3. CIN 1030/History of Film Art: 4 credits
  4. CIN 1500/Introduction to Cinema Studies I: 4 credits (required through spring 2019)
  5. PSW 2000/Screenwriting II: 4 credits
  6. PSW 2010/Playwriting II: 4 credits
  7. THP 2885/Theatre Histories I or THP 2890/Theatre Histories II: 3 credits

*Students must earn a minimum grade of C- in PSW 1000 and PSW 1010 in order to continue in the sequence to PSW 2000 and PSW 2010, respectively.

Note: CIN 1500/Introduction to Cinema Studies I satisfied the film history requirement (CIN 1030) through spring 2019.

Electives: 17 credits**

Students choose their electives in consultation with their faculty advisor. At least 10 of the 17 credits must be upper level. Courses in the list of examples are subject to change, and new courses may be added.

**A minimum grade of C- is required for any elective pre-requisites.

Synthesis courses: 14 credits

  1. PSW 3880/Junior Seminar: 4 credits***
  2. PSW 4880/Senior Colloquium in Playwriting and Screenwriting: 2 credits
  3. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  4. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

***A minimum grade of C- is required in the Junior Seminar as pre-requisite for the Senior Project.

CIN 1510/Introduction to Cinema Studies II
COM 3701/The Business of Writing
PSW 1250/Plays and Playgoing
PSW 3000/Screenwriting III
PSW 3120/The Writer and the Documentary
PSW 3130/Site-Specific Playwriting
PSW 3150/How to Say It: Pitch Sessions and Public Speaking for Writers
PSW 3155/The Art of Rewriting: Killing Our Darlings
PSW 3200/Playwriting III
PSW 3230/Writers’ Scene Workshop
PSW 3300/Writing for Television
PSW 3310/Book Writing: Story Structure in Musical Theatre
PSW 3400/The TV Writer’s Room
PSW 3500/Documentary Theatre: Performing Real Life
PSW 3600/Songwriting for the Musical
PSW 4150/Making New Plays
THP 2205/Shakespeare Then and Now
THP 3725/Adapting Literature for Performance

Second Liberal Arts Major or Minor, or Other Study Electives Requirement

Effective fall 2018, playwriting and screenwriting majors have the option of either completing a second liberal arts major or minor or other study electives to fulfill this requirement. A minor is strongly encouraged. The list of approved majors/minors is as follows: anthropology, art history, Asian studies, biology, chemistry, environmental studies, French, gender studies, global black studies, history, Italian, Jewish studies, Latin American studies, linguistics, literature, mathematics/computer science, philosophy, philosophy and art, political science, psychology, sociology, or Spanish.

This requirement is not fulfilled by certain second majors and minors. Students are still encouraged to pursue these studies and there is room in their schedules to do so. Excluded majors/minors are: arts management, film/video production, music, theatre and performance, creative writing, communications, and visual arts.

If a student wishes to pursue liberal arts study in a field which does not offer a minor, a five course concentration with two upper level electives (minimum of 18 credits including a minimum of six upper-level credits) can be substituted in consultation with their advisor.

Playwriting/Screenwriting Double Majors

Playwriting/Screenwriting double majors are required to take Junior Seminar in either playwriting or screenwriting. They are not required to do the Senior Project or Senior Colloquium if they choose a Senior Project in their other major. Double majors in the non-excluded areas of study will fulfill the required minor.

Minor requirements:

The college also offers separate Minors in Playwriting and Screenwriting.


Faculty

  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BFA, New York University
    • MFA, Yale School of Drama
  • Associate Professor of Practice in Screenwriting
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Professor of Theatre and Performance
    Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, Louisiana State University
    • MA, PhD, New York University
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BFA, MFA, New York University
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, Yale University
    • MA, New York University
    • MFA, Brooklyn College
  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, University of Southern California
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, University of Tampa
    • MFA, University of Iowa
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BFA, Rhode Island School of Design
    • MFA, Yale University
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting and Film
    Media Manager
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • MFA, Brown University
  • Lecturer Playwriting
    • BA: Brown University
    • MSt: New College, University of Oxford
    • MFA: Hunter College
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, University of California, Los Angeles
    • MFA, Columbia University

  • Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, Lutheran College
    • MFA, Brooklyn College

  • Director of New Plays Now
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting
    • BA, Tufts University
    • BFA, School of the Museum of Fine Arts
    • MFA, Bard College
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting
    • MFA, Catholic University
    • JD, Rutgers Law School

  • Lecturer
    Director, Academic Resource Center
    • MusB, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MM, New York University
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • MFA, National University of Theatre and Film, Bucharest
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, Antioch College
    • MFA, New York University

  • Associate Professor of Screenwriting
    • BA, City College of New York
    • MFA, Yale School of Drama
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Seattle University
    • MFA, Bennington College
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting and Film
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY

Contributing Faculty

  • Lecturer in Theatre and Performance
    • BA, MFA, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
  • Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MFA, New York University

Courses

An introduction to the basic techniques of writing for the stage, beginning with the story. Multiple short writing assignments emphasize character, plot, diction, subtext, and meaning. They include writing from personal experience, adapting a short story and a classical play, and using a current news story as inspiration. Students discuss Aristotle’s elements as they pertain to the scene, apply basic elements of the craft, read several short plays, and attend performances on campus and in New York City.

Credits: 4

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Introduces the student to writing a dramatic story for the screen, placing an emphasis on discovery, good work habits, critical assessment, and rewriting as essential to the professional writer. Through numerous assignments, students learn the basics of dramatic story structure, revealing character, writing dialogue, genre, and use of story suspense. All techniques are applied in a final short screenplay.

Credits: 4

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

What makes a play alive, provocative, and vital? Using classics of dramatic literature as well as plays that are new to the stage, students read and examine the ideas and mechanics of the play. An examination of some key texts and theories, including Aristotle’s Poetics, Brecht’s Epic Theatre, Artaud’s Theatre of Cruelty, and Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed lead to a fresh look at the old and the new. Students attend plays on campus and in New York City, and meet some of today’s leading theatre artists.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Using an existing short piece of fiction, students delineate the elements of the story, experiencing their importance and power; translate the short story into a screenplay for a narrative film; and complete two drafts of a 25-page screenplay. In the process, they learn the techniques of adaptation for the screen and a deeper level of dramatic story structure. Emphasis is on discovering the dramatic character when evaluating the merits of a particular adaptation, which extends to evaluating one’s own ideas for a screenplay; introducing genre and story types; and research as a dramatist’s fundamental tool.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010 Or DWR1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Building on PSW 1000, students read and attend new plays, develop in-class writing exercises, and then write and revise a 30-page play.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1000 Or THP3590 Or DWR1000 Or DRA3590

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

An introduction to full-length narrative and the three-act structure. The art and craft of screenwriting are explored through analysis and developing, writing, and rewriting a longer screenplay (60 pages), with an emphasis on what Hollywood looks for in a screenplay. Techniques covered include voice-over, establishing shots, montages, and creating tension and payoff. The business of the screenwriter, how to pitch, and finding work/selling a screenplay are also covered.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW2000 Or DWR2000

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

In recent years, opportunities in nonfiction work have grown significantly. In this course, students screen and analyze documentary films, and produce their own short nonfiction film on digital video. Field assignments include researching and conducting interviews; written assignments include narration exercises, documentary summaries, and scripts. Students also learn the basics of Final Cut Pro editing software.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010 And CIN1500

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Explores techniques for developing narrative and dramatic structures in specific spaces/sites. Students read, view, and discuss sample works and theoretical investigation as a means to contextualize our inquiry, while also doing a series of ‘building block’ exercises both in and out of the classroom. Small modular writing assignments build to a final full-length piece.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

An exploration of revision techniques and strategies in a workshop environment. Students revise existing material through examinations of character, dialogue, and structure; text analysis; and other tools. First drafts and production drafts of contemporary American plays are also studied and discussed.

Credits: 4

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Students research, gather, and incorporate ideas from a variety of sources to write a new full-length play. Weekly readings of plays are paired with focused writing exercises. The course culminates in a public reading of excerpts from students’ completed plays. Students also explore the business of playwriting, touring a theatre in New York City and meeting with artistic staff.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW2010 Or THP3591 Or DWR2010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Explores the fine anatomy of writing the scene, with emphasis on writers looking at their work from the perspective of the director and on working with actors. Students write and direct a dramatic scene in digital video and learn to produce their video, using Final Cut Pro editing software and the basics of camera/lighting techniques.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW2000 Or DWR2000

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Screenings and discussion of various forms of the medium, including the sitcom, television movies, and documentary and experimental forms. Students write a script that is critiqued in class and rewritten, with concentration on the world of the story, tone, character, style, dramatic tension, pacing, and evolving narrative.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010 Or DWR1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Examines the history and craft of storytelling in musical theatre. Students consider song topic and placement to structure a short original musical. The ability to read and write music is not required.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1000 And PSW1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Students experience the real-world model of collaboratively writing a television series in a “writer’s room.” With the instructor as “show runner,” the class creates a half-hour series and together writes a pilot episode. Each student then writes an episode for the series. Episodic story structure, weaving multiple story lines, the tradition television series, and newly emerging variations are covered.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010 Or DWR1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

The landscape of short-form, online, episodic storytelling is surveyed, and each student is required to conceive a short-form episodic series, create the show “bible,” and write and produce a pilot “webisode” for that series. Emphasis is on story structure and telling a story in a nontraditional form.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW1010 Or DWR1010

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Students will gain an understanding of the craft of writing and combining lyrics and music. Focus is placed on the process of artistic collaboration as librettists and composers are paired to create original songs. Students will also survey musical writing teams and repertoire. Composers must have the ability to create scores and regularly perform their work.

Credits: 4

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Students develop ideas for their senior project—a play or screenplay. They research, develop, and present their scenarios to the class for response and critique.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PSW2000 And PSW2010 And (CIN1500 Or CIN1510 ) And (THP2885 Or THP2890 )

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Writers and actors learn tools for working together on new plays. Taught by a playwright and a director, the class studies different collaborative models, including devised theatre, and explores communication strategies for working through creative friction. The course culminates in a final showcase on campus.

Credits: 3

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

During the solitary pursuit of writing their first full-length play or screenplay, students come together regularly to share in-process work for feedback and critique. A completion schedule is created, and assignments are given to aid in the scriptwriting discovery process. Classes are also devoted to visiting professionals who relate their experiences in the business of being a playwright or screenwriter.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: DWR3880 Or THP3890 Or PSW3880

Department: Playwriting and Screenwriting

Playwriting

Minor requirements:

The minor in playwriting is designed for students in all disciplines who want to explore and develop skills in writing for the stage.

Many students who pursue this minor are majoring in disciplines like theatre and performance, arts management, and gender studies. The skills developed in playwriting complement a liberal arts education.

Students interested in the minor must submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study. Upon admission to the minor, the student will be assigned a minor advisor from the playwriting faculty.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Playwriting

Five courses, to include:

  • PSW 1000/Playwriting I (4 credits)
  • THP 2885/Theatre Histories I or THP 2890/Theatre Histories II (3 credits)
  • PSW 2010/Playwriting II (4 credits)
  • Plus two of the following courses:
    PSW 1250/Plays and Playgoing (4 credits)
    PSW 3155/The Art of Rewriting: Killing our Darlings (4 credits)
    PSW 3200/Playwriting III (4 credits)
    THP 2205/Shakespeare Then and Now (3 credits)
    THP 2885/Theatre Histories I or THP 2890/Theatre Histories II (3 credits)
    THP 3495/Black American Drama (4 credits)
    THP 3525/LGBTQ Drama (4 credits)

Faculty

  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BFA, MFA, New York University
  • Lecturer in Playwriting
    • BA, University of Tampa
    • MFA, University of Iowa
  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, University of Southern California
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Seattle University
    • MFA, Bennington College

Screenwriting

Minor requirements:

The minor in screenwriting is designed for students in all disciplines who want to explore and develop skills in writing for film and television.

Many students who pursue this minor are majoring in disciplines like cinema studies, media, society, and the arts, creative writing, journalism, or theatre and performance. The skills developed in screenwriting complement a liberal arts education.

Students interested in the minor must submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study. Upon admission to the minor, the student will be assigned a minor advisor from the screenwriting faculty.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Screenwriting

Five courses, to include:

  • PSW 1010/Screenwriting I (4 credits)
  • CIN 1500/Introduction to Cinema Studies I (4 credits)
    or
    CIN 1030/History of Film Art (4 credits)
  • PSW 2000/Screenwriting II (4 credits)
  • Plus two of the following courses:
    PSW 3000/Screenwriting III (4 credits)
    PSW 3120/The Writer and the Documentary (4 credits)
    PSW 3230/Writers’ Scene Workshop (4 credits)
    PSW 3300/Writing for Television (4 credits)
    PSW 3400/TV Writers’ Room (4 credits)
    PSW 3500/Writing the Web Series (4 credits)

Updates to the 2019-20 Course Catalog

April 21, 2020

  • Added CIN 1030 as alternative to CIN 1500

Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Practice in Screenwriting
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Screenwriting
    • BFA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Screenwriting
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Associate Professor of Screenwriting
    • BA, City College of New York
    • MFA, Yale School of Drama

Graduate Courses

Media Arts

Applications Not Accepted for 2020-21.

Description:

The MFA program in media arts trains students in the progressive, experimental, and participatory forms of creative, critical practice that comprise the cutting edge of contemporary media arts.

Collaboration and Social Engagement

Students collaborate with local communities and galleries to create socially engaged media art that addresses the community’s aspirations, concerns, and needs. Through these partnerships, students explore new modes and sites of media creation, exhibition, and reception. The program stresses the value of hands-on creation and collaboration, pairing students with artists and scholars active in contemporary media arts.

Multidisciplinary Curriculum

Our multidisciplinary curriculum encourages students to think beyond medium-specific approaches, providing them with ample elective choices within and beyond media arts. During their first year, students work in a collaborative environment, a directed studio in which students participate in web-based and installation-based media art. These collaborative works prepare students for their capstone project, a yearlong thesis individually supervised by a faculty member.

Immerse, Transform, and Imagine

This graduate program immerses students in dynamic media projects with neighboring communities. Focusing on a process-based model, students come to understand the transformational role that arts can play in communities. By motivating students to imagine futures through research-based art production, the program enables them to work across a variety of media and platforms, an essential skill that will allow graduates to position themselves within the ever-shifting media industry and landscape.

Requirements:

Students may elect to complete a two-year or a three-year program for the MFA in media arts.

Sixty credits can be completed in two years or 62 credits can be completed in three years. (29 credits in the common core; 23 credits of electives in media arts practice and media history and theory; an 8-credit thesis project as the culminating creative experience; and two elective credits in teaching assistantships for the three-year program).

A minimum 3.0 (B) cumulative GPA must be earned at Purchase College.

Two-year model | Three-year model

Two-year model

First year

Fall (14 credits)
MAC 5010/History and Theory of Media I 4 credits
MAC 5050/Media Arts Practice I 4 credits
MAC 5100/Media Arts Critique I 3 credits
MAC 5030/Pedagogy Workshop 3 credits
Spring (15 credits)
MAC 5020/History and Theory of Media II 4 credits
MAC 5060/Media Arts Practice II 4 credits
MAC 5105 Media Arts Critique II 3 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits

Second year

Fall (16 credits)
MAC 5040/Critical Research Methods in Media 4 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits
MAC 5990/MFA Thesis I 4 credits
Spring (15 credits)
MAC 5070/Topics in the History and Theory of Media 4 credits
MAC 5100/Media Arts Critique III 3 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits
MAC 5991/MFA Thesis II 4 credits

Three-year model

First year

Fall (11 credits)
MAC 5010/History and Theory of Media I 4 credits
MAC 5050/Media Arts Practice I 4 credits
MAC 5100/Media Arts Critique I 3 credits
Spring (11 credits)
MAC 5010/History and Theory of Media II 4 credits
MAC 5060/Media Arts Practice II 4 credits
MAC 5105/Media Arts Critique II 3 credits

Second year

Fall (11 credits)
MAC 5040/Critical Research Methods in Media 4 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits
MAC 5030/Pedagogy Workshop 3 credits
Spring (9 credits)
MAC 5070/Topics in the History and Theory of Media 4 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits
MAC 5998/Teaching assistantship 1 credit

Third year

Fall (9 credits)
MAC 5990/MFA Thesis I 4 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits
MAC 5998/Teaching assistantship 1 credit
Spring (11 credits)
MAC 5991/MFA Thesis II 4 credits
MAC 5110/Media Arts Critique III 3 credits
MAC 5/Media Arts elective 4 credits


Courses

This first half of a two-semester survey spans the appearance of print media to the development of early cinema, and reflects the interdisciplinary and evolving nature of media studies. Topics include the major theories of media and technology, the historical context in which each medium has appeared, and the schools of thought that have shaped people’s understanding of media and guided the analysis of media texts.

Credits: 4

Department: Media Arts and Culture

This second half of a two-semester survey spans the development of classical cinema to the burgeoning of new media environments, and reflects the interdisciplinary and evolving nature of media studies. Topics include the major theories of media and technology, the historical context in which each medium has appeared, and the schools of thought that have shaped people’s understanding of media and guided the analysis of media texts.

Credits: 4

Department: Media Arts and Culture

Designed to introduce graduate students to the fundamental methods and issues that arise in teaching media arts and media studies. The class explores the most contemporary methods in media pedagogy and media practices with the goal of preparing students to design their own courses in media arts and media studies.

Credits: 3

Department: Media Arts and Culture

Traces the steps entailed in making media art that responds to real-world situations, paying close attention to the complex, evolving relationship between situation and media forms. Students explore how makers can combine ethnography, design methods, and creative communication tactics to generate situations of ethical aesthetic reflection and potential social change.

Credits: 4

Department: Media Arts and Culture

The first half of a two-semester sequence designed to foster the growth of media artists through a model of teacher-led, peer-based learning that spans several parallel activities: critique, discussion, collaboration, and engagement with media art practitioners and the world of media art.

Credits: 4

Department: Media Arts and Culture

The second half of a two-semester sequence designed to foster the growth of media artists through a model of teacher-led, peer-based learning that spans several parallel activities: critique, discussion, collaboration, and engagement with media art practitioners and the world of media art.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAC5050

Department: Media Arts and Culture

Technology as a means to extend human sensory perception—from older mediums such as early photography, film, and sound recording to more recent developments in digital media and representation—is covered in detail. Major concepts include issues of tactility, affect, and materialization, as well as the role of sense and perception as it relates to the commodification of everyday life.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAC5010 And MAC5020

Department: Media Arts and Culture

Students examine Critical Pedagogy and its relationship to art. From Joseph Beuys to more recent examples, artists have been making schools to radically expand the definition of art and for other political purposes. We will discuss why and collaborate on several “school forms” of our own to take place on campus and off.

Credits: 3

Department: Media Arts and Culture

The first in a three-course sequence focused on the centrality of critique for the development of any creative practice. A critical model is developed that relies on both individual voices and collaborative process. Students hone and exercise their critical voice by learning to situate their practice historically and socially. All students participate in the thoughtful assessment of their classmates’ work and benefit from critiques by invited professionals and by organized visits to contemporary artists working in New York City.

Credits: 3

Department: Media Arts and Culture

The second in a three-course sequence focused on the centrality of critique for the development of any creative practice. A critical model is developed that relies on both individual voices and collaborative process. Students hone and exercise their critical voice by learning to situate their practice historically and socially. All students participate in the thoughtful assessment of their classmates’ work and benefit from critiques by invited professionals and by organized visits to contemporary artists working in New York City.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: MAC5100

Department: Media Arts and Culture

The third in a three-course sequence focused on the centrality of critique for the development of any creative practice. A critical model is developed that relies on both individual voices and collaborative process. Students hone and exercise their critical voice by learning to situate their practice historically and socially. All students participate in the thoughtful assessment of their classmates’ work and benefit from critiques by invited professionals and by organized visits to contemporary artists working in New York City.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: MAC5100 And MAC5105

Department: Media Arts and Culture

First part of a two-semester sequence. Students produce a work of media art and a scholarly contextualization of their work within the contemporary field. Students work under the direction of a faculty member to create a work of media art and to master the relevant literature, demonstrating a significant contribution to the field of media arts.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAC5010 And MAC5020

Department: Media Arts and Culture

Second part of a two-semester sequence. Students produce a work of media art and a scholarly contextualization of their work within the contemporary field. Students work under the direction of a faculty member to create a work of media art and to master the relevant literature, demonstrating a significant contribution to the field of media arts.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: MAC5990

Department: Media Arts and Culture

School of Humanities

With small classes, dynamic students, world-renowned guest artists and scholars, and one-on-one work with distinguished faculty, the School of Humanities provides an exceptional liberal arts education at a public institution. You will hone your writing, expand your thinking, encounter the world, and make your mark.

Undergraduate Courses

Art History

Description:

The art history BA centers engagement with art—as a material, critical, and social practice—in a curriculum designed to foster students’ curiosity and intellectual growth. The program is committed to the rigorous interrogation of received histories and their relation to entrenched systems of oppression, and to producing scholars equipped to contribute to building a more just world.

The study of art history introduces students to all periods of history and many of the world’s cultures. The program offers study of the various forms of art and architecture: painting, sculpture, graphics, decorative arts, photography, design, and performance. Scholarly approaches to these media emphasize social, cultural, and political history and explore a wide range of interdisciplinary and theoretical methods.

Study on Campus, in New York City, and Abroad

The program is designed to introduce not only subjects but approaches: visual and stylistic analysis, criticism, iconography, historiography, and methodology. Because art history requires the study of original works of art, many courses are supplemented by field trips to museums and art galleries in New York City, just 20 miles south of the Purchase campus. The on-campus Neuberger Museum of Art is also a major resource. Internships and the college’s study abroad programs provide many opportunities for undergraduates to get involved in the art world outside the classroom.

The Junior Year

During the junior year, students select a broad field of study that includes the architecture, sculpture, and painting of one of several periods or areas (e.g., Renaissance, African, or modern). Students are urged to take at least three courses outside art history related to their area of study (e.g., courses in 19th- and 20th-century literature, history, and/or philosophy, if the focus is on the modern period). The Junior Seminar in Art History examines selected approaches to the study of art history by analyzing various interpretations of the work of a single artist.

The Senior Project

The program culminates in a two-semester senior project, in which each student uses the methods of art history in an in-depth project that may take a variety of forms: a research thesis, an exhibition at the Neuberger Museum of Art, or a critical study.

After Graduation

Many alumni choose to pursue their interest in art history through employment at museums and galleries, often earning advanced degrees in art history and museum studies. Other alumni have chosen to work in such fields as art education, film production, publishing and as art handlers and transporters. Still others pursue careers outside of the arts, but find the critical thinking, visual literacy, and subject matter of this field meaningful and useful to their lives and work.

Updated 9-24-20

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all art history undergraduate majors must complete 14 courses and an 8-credit senior project, as follows:

  1. ARH 1010/History of Art Survey I
  2. ARH 1020/History of Art Survey II
  3. ARH 1021/History of Art Survey II Discussion
  4. Six specialized art history courses, which must include:
    • ARH 3880/Junior Seminar in Art History
    • One course in the history of art before 1800
  5. Two studio courses in the visual arts
  6. Three courses in related disciplines and/or a foreign language
  7. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  8. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Note: An art history course offered by the School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education may not be used to fulfill requirement 1, 2, 3, or 4 above, but may be used as a general elective.

Internships may also be taken at the Neuberger Museum of Art or at area museums and galleries. Internships can count toward the elective academic requirements for the major.

Art History majors with a particular interest in museums may want to consider the Museum Studies Minor as a supplement to the major.

Minor requirements:

The minor in art history is designed for undergraduate students in all disciplines at Purchase College who are interested in art history and visual culture.

Students interested in pursuing this minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. Upon admission to the minor, the student is assigned a minor advisor from the art history faculty.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Art History

Six courses in art history, as follows:

  1. ARH 1010/History of Art Survey I
  2. ARH 1020/History of Art Survey II
  3. ARH 1021/History of Art Survey II Discussion
  4. Three specialized art history courses (2000 level or above)

Note: Art history courses offered by the School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education may not be used to fulfill these requirements.


Faculty

  • Lecturer in Art History
    • BA, University of Albany, SUNY
    • MA, University of Illinois
    • PhD, University of Bradford
  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, University of California, Santa Barbara
    • MA, PhD, Stanford University
  • Lecturer in Art History
    • BA, MBA, PhD, New York University
  • Professor of Art History
    • BS, Wheelock College
    • MDiv, Harvard University
    • PhD, Emory University
  • Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Harvard University
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Associate Professor of Art History
    Director, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • BA, Tufts University
    • MA, George Washington University
    • PhD, Rutgers University
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Duquesne University Honors College
    • MA, New York University
    • MPhil, Graduate Center, City University of New York
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Professor of Art History
    • BA, Hampshire College
    • MA, PhD, Boston University
  • Associate Professor of Art History
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MA, University of Iowa
    • PhD, University of Southern California
  • Assistant Professor of Art History
    • BA, Wellesley College
    • PhD, University of Chicago

Contributing Faculty

  • Alex Gordon Curator of Art of the Americas, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • MA, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
    • BA, MA, PhD, University of Montreal
  • Associate Professor of Painting and Drawing
    • BA, Princeton University
    • MA, Chelsea College of Art and Design, London
    • MFA, Rhode Island School of Design

Courses

The art and architecture of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and medieval Europe, presented in terms of their visual and cultural significance.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A survey of the history of Western art, including the works of Masaccio, Van Eyck, Donatello, Bosch, Michelangelo, and Leonardo; followed by the rise of national styles in the 17th and 18th centuries in France and England. Nineteenth-century neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and postimpressionism, as well as modernism and developments in 20th-century art, are also covered. The discussion is required.

Credits: 3

COREQ: ARH1021

Department: Art History

A discussion of the history of Western art, including the works of Masaccio, Van Eyck, Donatello, Bosch, Michelangelo, and Leonardo; followed by the rise of national styles in the 17th and 18th centuries in France and England. Nineteenth-century neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and postimpressionism, as well as modernism and developments in 20th-century art, are also covered.

Credits: 1

COREQ: ARH1020

Department: Art History

In this seminar-style course, freshmen will explore the aesthetic, historical, and literary context of a given exhibition at the Neuberger Museum of Art. Through close observation, readings, and discussion, students will gain a deep knowledge of the artists in the exhibition, the aesthetic and social questions relevant to the artists’ work, and the curatorial logic guiding the exhibition.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The work of Courbet, Manet, and the circle of the Impressionists sets the stage for the revolutionary modern movements of the 20th century (e.g., Cubism, Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism). The course concludes with those artists who came to prominence in America at the time of World War II.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Introduces the diversity of practices that have dominated the history of art since World War II. Movements include: Abstract Expressionism, postwar European painting, happenings, Fluxus, Pop art, minimalism, conceptual art, performance art, and postmodernism. While European and North American art are emphasized, Asian and Latin American art are also addressed, particularly in the context of increasing globalization.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Explores a range of topics, including the history of art museums, current theories and methodologies of display, and museum administration. In addition to class discussion, students meet with museum personnel from the Neuberger Museum of Art to learn the basics of museum operations, including curatorial work, exhibition design, registration, education and public programming, marketing, public relations, and finance.

Credits: 3

Department: Art History

An examination of painting, sculpture, and architecture during the European Middle Ages, from the end of the Roman Empire through the Gothic era (c. 300–1400). French and Italian art are emphasized, but works from every part of Christian Europe, from England and Spain to the Byzantine Empire, are included.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

What is American about American art, and how have questions of race and ethnic and cultural identity shaped our visual culture? Offering an interpretive overview of American history through the lens of American culture, this course traces the formation of American identity from the eve of the European arrival in North America to shortly before the beginning of World War I.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An examination of painting, sculpture, and architecture produced in Italy from the late 13th century to the late 15th century, including Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Brunelleschi, Piero della Francesca, and Botticelli.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An examination of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy during the 16th century. The course begins with an in-depth study of the works of Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Bramante, Giorgione, and Titian, and then traces the evolution of the anticlassical style known as mannerism.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Developments in Greek sculpture, vase painting, and architecture are traced from the destruction of the Mycenaean palaces (c. 1200 BCE) to the rise of the Roman Empire (1st and 2nd centuries BCE). Topics include the impact of Near Eastern civilizations on early Greek culture, the “classical” style’s florescence in 5th-century Athens, and the creation of the Hellenistic world by Alexander the Great.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A survey presenting key artistic works from the cultures of West Africa and the Congo region. Students learn about the artistic, social, and political aspects important to these works and the artists that make them. Primary themes include accumulative and multimedia aesthetics, sustainable materials, music and performance, gender, divination, royalty, spirituality, nomadism, collective production, and contemporary art.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Begins by examining the relation between landscape and modernity in nineteenth-century painting and photography, ranging from Impressionism to travel and survey photography. We then track modern art’s changing relation to both the natural and built environment through land art, earth art, and the New Topographics movement of the 1960s and 1970s, concluding with contemporary art of the human-altered environment.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

This survey examines the arts and architecture of Africa in a global context from the 13th century to the present. In regional studies of the continent’s vast territory and diaspora, we analyze artworks to consider their roles in daily life, ritual, displays of power and prestige, artistic exploration and innovation, and more. Weekly visits to the Neuberger Museum are required.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Examines the arts and architecture of Africa in the 20th and 21st centuries, engaging critically with how the field of modern and contemporary African art has developed. Students consider the influence of cross-cultural interactions on artistic practices, concepts of traditional, popular, and high art, colonialism and independence movements, primitivism, the rise of African modernisms, Afro-futurism, and more.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An introduction to women artists from the Renaissance era through the Enlightenment, including Anguissola, Gentileschi, Vigée-Lebrun, and Kauffmann. Topics include access to professions, constructions of sexuality and gender, and attitudes toward the body in representation.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Since the 1800s, the avant-gardes have tried to resist the delimited role of fine art in Western culture. In this course, students examine the strategies that avant-garde artists have used to reconnect their art practice with the more contentious areas of social and political life.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Art History

Students contextualize Beninese contemporary art and culture into the larger context of West African history. Readings in African history and post-colonial theory accompany hands-on workshops on how to make and write about art while visiting Benin. Students will write response papers, participate in class discussions, and make work using the methods presented in the course.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Half of this team-taught course is devoted to examining Johannes Vermeer’s subjects, painting techniques, and reception. The other half examines the invention and use of comparable subjects and literary techniques during the three eras in which Vermeer figured prominently on the global stage: the Dutch Golden Age, the American Gilded Age, and the US financial boom of the 1990s.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Takes a broad view of the aesthetic, historical, and conceptual development of modern and contemporary art and architecture of the Middle East. Topics include legacies of Orientalism; colonialism and decolonization; religion and secularization; relationships between art and nation-building; the rise of petrocultures; and questions of reception in the context of global contemporary art.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Explores the history of twentieth-century architecture through the modern city, tracing the rise and occasional decline of the metropolis internationally. Students analyze how architects and urban planners proposed new visions of urban life and devised solutions for urgent social and political problems related to urbanization (e.g. public space, housing, gentrification, globalization).

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

How and why do certain artworks become embroiled in major public debates, political scandals, and legal disputes? Beginning with the 1863 Salon des Refusés and continuing to the present day through an itinerary that travels the globe, students will examine the role of controversy in defining art, society, and how we imagine the relationship between the two.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The paintings of Michelangelo Mersisi da Caravaggio (1571–1610) had a revolutionary impact on the art world of his era, and the fascination with his extraordinary re-evaluation of pictorial effects continues to this day. This course examines Caravaggio’s art and career and considers responses to his work by other artists, including film directors, up to the present.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

This seminar focuses on the inception of the “readymade” and the abandonment of traditional forms of painting in the work of Marcel Duchamp, as well as the later development of readymade practices in the context of New York and Paris Dada. The history of the readymade as an artistic strategy is traced.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1010 Or ARH1020 Or ARH2050 Or ARH2060

Department: Art History

Based on objects in the Neuberger Museum of Art. Students undertake independent research projects on works in the museum’s collection, investigating issues of documentation and interpretation. Limited to art history majors.

Credits: 3

Department: Art History

Examines the relationship between the traditional crafts and the upheavals of modernity. Beginning with the Arts and Crafts movement in the 19th century and continuing to the present day, students explore how craft is framed as protest against industrialization, as utopian model of labor and exchange, and as aesthetic transformation.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Surveys American painting, sculpture, decorative arts, and architecture until the opening of the Armory Show in 1913. The course explores the distinctiveness of the American art tradition.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994 Or HIS1000-2994 Or HIS3000-3994 Or HIS4000-4994

Department: Art History

A study of African American painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, drawings, photography, film, and vernacular and popular art. The course begins with the Afro-Atlantic era and covers images made by Southern artists in the 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as artists associated with the “New Negro” movement, the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights movement, and postmodernism.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A study of artists and exhibitions from and about Africa, spanning a wide variety of traditional and new media. Important exhibitions like The Short Century: Independence and Liberation Movements in Africa, 1945–1994 (2001) and Looking Both Ways: Art of the Contemporary African Diaspora (2004) are analyzed. Themes include framing “Africa,” African identities, memory and place, and popular culture.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Focuses on women artists and their place within the art-historical narrative of the 20th century. Students examine both the diverse practices of women artists and the reception of their work by critics, dealers, and collectors.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An introduction to a wide range of photographic practices, from the medium’s conception in the 19th century to the ubiquitous online photo-sharing of today. Lectures have a special focus on the major artistic developments of photography. Topics include the significance of vernacular practices and their historical contexts in different parts of the world.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Treats the history of photography in a global framework. Topics include the transformation of photography as it spreads from Europe to Africa, the Americas, Asia, and the Middle East; the decentering of European modernism in postmodernism; the role of photography in colonialism and decolonization; and its role in fine art as well as vernacular portraiture, journalism, documentary, and other fields.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Examines the photographic medium from its earliest forms through the 1920s and 1930s. Topics include technical innovations, manipulations and interventions, function and reception, the relationship to the fine arts, and debates about photography’s claims of realism.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A study of the German painter, printmaker, and draftsman Albrecht Dürer. The artist’s interests in science, politics, religious conflicts, sexuality, and the non-Western world are emphasized.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994 Or HIS1000-2994 Or HIS3000-3994 Or HIS4000-4994

Department: Art History

Examines the history of painting and sculpture in Northern Europe from the 14th century to c. 1570. Flemish, Dutch, French, German, and Czech works are considered, with emphasis on such artists as the Limbourg Brothers, Van Eyck, Bosch, Dürer, and Bruegel.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994 Or HIS1000-2994 Or HIS3000-3994 Or HIS4000-4994

Department: Art History

From ancient to neoclassical, Campania’s monuments are overwhelming with the riches of the past. Students delve into the histories of these great works and the ways they have shaped the modern world through the development of revivalist styles, academic disciplines, and tourism as a leisure activity. Includes visits to such historic sites as Pompeii, Paestum, Amalfi, and Naples.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Founded in Italy in 1909, Futurism declared a love of speed, aggression, and technology, and rejected the clichés of nature, love, and antiquity. This course addresses the ways in which Futurists attacked the conventions of art, includes a more general discussion of Futurist art in Italy in relation to its past, and investigates the influence of Futurism in France, Britain, and Russia.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Investigates the themes, diverse genres, and major figures in 17th-century Dutch painting. Current problems of interpretation are examined, including the idea that there may have been a specifically northern form of visual thinking.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Despite a growing interest in the work of the Russian avant-garde, there is still relatively little known about the artists of the late Russian Empire and the early Soviet Union. This course addresses the broad scope and multidisciplinary practice of Russian modernism, from the shocking primitivism of The Rite of Spring to the cold pragmatism of constructivism.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Explores the scope and complexity of pre-Columbian art and civilizations, which flourished in Mesoamerica and the Andes. While these societies were responsible for outstanding achievements in mathematics, astronomy, and agriculture, their most enduring contribution is manifested in their art and architecture. Includes required visits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Museum of Natural History.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An examination of the visual arts in Venice and its hinterland from the early Middle Ages to the end of the Venetian Republic in 1797. In addition to in-depth treatment of such artists as Bellini, Carpaccio, Giorgione, Titian, and Tiepolo, the social context of the arts and the unique urban development of Venice are studied in detail.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A study of the representation of Asians, Africans, and Americans (and their native lands) in European and American art from the end of the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Some consideration is also given to the impact of non-Western arts on the European tradition.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Design is both a noun and a verb. This course deals with the idea of design as a cultural phenomenon and a creative practice. Contemporary design and its making are situated within a broad methodological framework, drawing from existing and emerging theories in anthropology, art history, film studies, criticism, the history of technology, and architecture.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Focuses on contemporary Latin American artists working in and out of Latin America: Gabriel Orozco, Guillermo Gomez Peña, Adriana Varejao, Teresa Margolles, Carlos Garaicoa, Betsabeé Romero, Javier Tellez, Nadín Ospina, Tania Bruguera, and Nicolás de Jesus. Students analyze the way these artists address such questions as urban violence, social inequality, pollution, emigration, and national identity.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Examines the history of design as it parallels the history of technology and industrialization. Covering a variety of design disciplines, including architecture and urban planning, graphic design, fashion, and industrial design, this course focuses less on aesthetics than on the cultural programs that have shaped buildings, objects, and communication systems for more than two centuries.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The simultaneous development of various painters associated with Impressionism (e.g., Monet, Renoir, Morisot, Pissarro, Manet, Degas, Cassatt) is presented. This radical new art movement is traced from the first Impressionist exhibition of 1874 to the last exhibition of 1886 and the appearance of the post-Impressionists. Students explore the shared relationships of the Impressionist artists.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Examines a selection of poetry, short stories, novels, and films from different historical periods that foreground the visual arts through various means, including the character of the artist, the practices of art, the nature of creativity, and the critical reception of art.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

European art from the French Revolution to 1900, with movements in France, Germany, and England receiving particular attention. Major artists studied include David, Gericault, Delacroix, Ingres, Frederich, Constable, Turner, the Pre-Raphaelites, Daumier, Manet, Degas, Monet, and Gauguin.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Art History

An examination of visual artists who have used performance as an integral component of their practice, with emphasis on post-1950 object-oriented work (rather than theatre or dance). Both primary texts and critical interpretations are studied.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH2050 Or ARH2060

Department: Art History

An examination of contemporary art outside of the traditional media of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Looking at painting-based performances of the 1950s, feminist body art, guerrilla television, and current political interventions based in digital media, students identify the strategies artists used to create new forms, and assess their success in modifying our understanding of the world.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Art History

Examines photography as a medium used by European colonizers and its subsequent use by Africans for self-definition and liberation. Topics include early studio photography, photographs in cultural outlets like the Nigerian edition of Drum magazine, photography during the apartheid era, and contemporary work. The political and stylistic aspects of portrait, documentary, ethnographic, pop, and abstract images are considered.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

From photography’s 19th-century origins to contemporary practices, this survey course explores how and why photography became central to arguments about the modernity of African visual art. Moving from one regional focus to the next, students examine photography’s role in expeditionary and ethnographic projects, identity formation, political activism, spirituality, documenting the landscape, and representing the fantastical and the everyday.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A variety of intersections between extreme mental conditions and the production of works of art during the modern period are investigated. Topics include connections between creativity and mental instability, artists with a history of mental disorder, and theories about stylistic or formal affinities between madness and art.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Focuses on the work of French artists from the early modern era to the French Revolution, with special attention to the Gallic obsession with realism, alongside the more abstract aspects of representation.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Conceptions of what sculpture can be were radically transformed over the course of the 20th century. This course presents a survey of 20th-century sculpture, with emphasis on innovative materials and techniques, the changing relationship between viewer and object, and new modes of exhibition. The work of Duchamp, Bourgeois, Calder, Judd, Hesse, and Smithson, among others, is discussed.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Emerging from a longstanding literary tradition, examples of utopian architecture give insight into the ideals and fears of the cultures that produced them. This course explores both utopian and dystopian architectural visions, beginning with the Enlightenment works of Ledoux and Boullée and ending with the paper projects of 1960s groups like Archigram and Superstudio.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

If the postwar period famously represented the ascendency of American art, what art forms emerged simultaneously in traditional European centers? This course examines seemingly antithetical practices in France, Italy, Germany, and elsewhere: Art Informel, nouveau réalisme (new realism), Arte Povera, neoexpressionist painting, body art, conceptualism, Young British Art, etc. How has the changing European political landscape affected art and its institutions?

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An examination of critical and theoretical writing by artists about art. The course considers texts from various eras, but focuses primarily on 20th-century and contemporary material. Artists’ writings are analyzed in the context of art criticism as a whole, and students also have the opportunity try their hand at criticism.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Islam burst forth from its cradle in Arabia and onto the world stage during the 7th century CE. The first caliphates were characterized by important military, diplomatic, and cultural encounters with the Christian Byzantine and Carolingian Empires. This course explores the art, literature, and architecture of these societies, with a focus on artistic adaptations, assimilations, and differences.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The Islamic conquests of Spain and Sicily brought Muslim culture to European shores for the first time. These conquests resulted in a dynamic artistic exchange among Muslim, Christian, and Jewish medieval traditions in the region. Critical issues for consideration include the impact of trade and diplomacy on this exchange and the lasting influence of Islamic art on the West.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A broad look at modern and contemporary Mexican art, using an interdisciplinary and comparative approach. Special emphasis is on the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) and its aftermath throughout the 20th century. Students analyze links between the visual arts (including mural painting, prints, and photography) and the literature, the popular scene and the mainstream, the street art and the gallery art.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Provides art history majors with an opportunity to examine the nature of the discipline by analyzing and comparing the writings of several art historians. The seminar concentrates on the work of a single artist in light of various art historical approaches. This writing-intensive course requires a variety of short essays and concludes with a research paper and class presentation. Limited to art history majors.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Students focus on developing competence in both critical style and content. Focusing on visual art, the course explores different kinds of critical voices, from belle-lettristic to theoretical. Readings and discussions analyze examples by leading critics. Writing assignments aim for students to develop an engaging argument, and the importance of revision, clear thinking, and descriptive ability is stressed.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Explores ideas of the “normal” and “non-normal” in art and design today. Through readings, guest speakers, and projects, the class investigates both traditional and unusual depictions of bodies, race, and gender, along with the art and design practices developed in order to represent and understand them.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Examines the resurgence, or persistence, in recent art of the sublime: an experience of overwhelming grandeur. Why have contemporary artists (Matthew Barney, Edward Burtynsky, Tacita Dean, Olafur Eliasson, Andreas Gursky, Bill Viola, and others) turned to an 18th-century aesthetic theory in order to address the pressing issues of our time: climate change, the expansion of technology, and economic globalization?

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Participants in this seminar propose, research, plan, and coordinate an exhibition series and related public programming to be undertaken the following semester (as part of the course, Exhibition II). These exhibitions will take place in the Neuberger Museum, other sites around campus, or in a combination of Museum-based and other locations.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH4035 Or ARH4037

Department: Art History

Participants in this seminar coordinate an exhibition series and related public programming based on the plans and preparations of the previous semester (conducted as part of the course, Exhibition I). These exhibitions take place in the Neuberger Museum, other sites around campus, or in a combination of Museum-based and other locations.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: ARH4025

Department: Art History

In this seminar, students and the instructor co-curate an exhibition for the Neuberger Museum of Art. The class works on all aspects of the exhibition with the instructor and museum staff. Students learn about the various functions of departments, including curatorial, education, exhibition design, development, and public relations, putting exhibition theory into practice. Exhibition topics vary.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

An investigation of the historical development and function of museums. Students examine the growth of collections and exhibitions, along with the various roles that museums have played in relation to art history and society around the world. Central to this course and its final project is the question: “What should a museum be in the 21st century?”

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH2140 Or ARH4030 Or ARH4715

Department: Art History

A rigorous examination of the historical, theoretical, and concrete concerns of curatorial practice. Course-work culminates in a complete exhibition proposal.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH2050 Or ARH2060

Department: Art History

Considers the validity of obscene imagery—eroticism, violence, scatology, racism, and hate speech—in recent artistic practice. Students investigate the struggle to define the terms “art” and “obscenity” and the efforts to censor such art. What are the artistic, critical, and political effects of engaging with obscenity? What are the motivations and effects of attempting to censor it?

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH2060

Department: Art History

Addresses the tension between art and document, or making and recording, in twentieth-century visual culture. The first half investigates the aesthetics and politics of documentary photography and film, including conflicts between realism and modernism. The second half examines the use of documents and documentation by postmodern art and subsequent transformations in the style, form, and truth-content of documentary practices.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Since the 1990s, the art market has become integral to an understanding of contemporary art practices. This course introduces the economic foundation of the art market and the practices of participants. The focus is on the history of the primary market, where new works of art produced “on spec” are introduced to the public in a retail setting.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The relationship between artistic practice and the social realm is addressed, with emphasis on the development of the avant-garde in the 19th and 20th centuries, the role of artists in contemporary political discourse, and the theoretical discourse that constitutes the larger debate on these issues.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Art History

The 1970s are often thought about in frivolous terms, as the decade of disco and bell-bottoms. In art, this period is often overshadowed by the radical avant-gardes of the 1960s and new developments in art during the 1980s. This seminar reconsiders the art and culture of the ’70s in the context of social and political currents of the period.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH2050 Or ARH2060

Department: Art History

Drawing on both contemporary artists’ and critics’ writings and recent historical accounts, students consider minimalist art of the 1960s as a well-defined movement comprising a specific group of artists, versus “minimalism” as a diffuse tendency appearing in sculpture, painting, film, music, and dance. The relationship of minimalism to subsequent practices—postminimalism, process and land art, and conceptualism—is also explored.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

African-American artistic trends since 1968 are examined by using the binary of East Coast-West Coast as appropriated from hip-hop culture, particularly in Los Angeles, Oakland, and New York. Both the limits of hip-hop aesthetics in the visual arts and the limits of thinking about “black aesthetics” as a stable or quantifiable style are tested.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Explores the ways in which ability and disability are conceived, represented, and negotiated in museum culture. Weekly discussions, visiting lecturers and screenings will examine key theoretical concepts, practical case studies, as well as the use of educational and internet-based media as assistive technologies. Specific topics will include: museums and the establishment of norms; the category of “assistive technology”; inclusive architecture and design; staring and other practices of looking; disability and performance art; media advocacy and activism.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Painting has long been accompanied by theories describing its abilities to attract, deceive, and even harm. This course looks at key theories and debates in the history of the medium (e.g., Rubenistes vs. Poussinistes, painting’s role among pluralistic practices) to better understand how both making and seeing a painting are colored by a history of ideas.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1020 Or ARH2050

Department: Art History

Why design? Why consume? What is desire? Are you what you make? Are you what you consume? How does design communicate? Design is a complex activity that touches on fields as diverse as psychoanalysis and anthropology. This course provides a theoretical understanding of design practice, production, and use (consumption). Topics include graphic and digital design, furniture, architecture, and industrial design.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Focuses on objects and movements influenced by industrialization and mechanization in the U.S. between 1900 and 1940. Topics include the rise of the skyscraper in American architecture and its effect on painters and printmakers, the advent of the automobile and the assembly line’s replacement of the factory worker, and Dada’s expression of the havoc reeked during World War I by new machine-age technology.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The work of Robert Rauschenberg is examined in the context of postwar neo-avant-garde activities in the U.S. and in relation to the work of contemporaries like Jasper Johns and John Cage. Students also review recent theoretical debates about the meaning and significance of the artist’s work. Some background in the study of modern or contemporary art is useful.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

A practical course in art criticism, which meets regularly in New York. Contemporary works of art form the basis for lectures, discussions, and written essays.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Art History

Since the late 1800s, pre-Columbian art and history have inspired Latin American artists. This course investigates that phenomenon through an in-depth study of the work of individual artists, including Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, as well as more contemporary figures. Students are also introduced to pre-Columbian art and architecture.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Although Vincent van Gogh is one of the world’s best-known and most beloved artists, his work is often reduced to simplistic notions of madness and genius. This course expands students’ understanding of the artist by exploring his connection to the contemporary contexts of mechanical reproduction, national identity, and urban culture.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1020 Or ARH2050 Or ARH3000-4994

Department: Art History

This seminar focuses on uses of history—as both subject and method—in art around the turn of the 21st century. Within a globally comparative frame, students investigate contemporary theories and practices that take stock of the past in order to reimagine the future at a moment when the world seems simultaneously more connected and more fractured than ever before.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1020 Or ARH2050 Or ARH2060

Department: Art History

Explores reciprocal influences of Western and non-Western art in the modern period. Topics include diverse artistic movements like “Orientalism,” “Japonisme,” and “Primitivism.” The class also examines the impact of non-Western art on specific artists, including Delacroix, Manet, Whistler, Picasso, and Pollock.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

This seminar delves into the historical, theoretical, and practical aspects of museum and exhibition practices in the U.S., from encyclopedic museums to storefront galleries. In addition to classroom discussion, students visit arts institutions in the area to consider collection and exhibition-related issues and to learn more about the operational function and structure of museums.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

African art and visual culture are considered in the context of African film. African youth, who make up most of the continent’s population, have had a marked effect on many sociopolitical phenomena. The films screened address African youth culture and such issues as the new independence (1960s), post-apartheid South Africa, youth rebels, religious fundamentalism, HIV, hip-hop and digital culture, and global emigration.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

The visual record of the production and consumption of food and drink are examined in this seminar. Topics include food in the still life, the representation of gluttony, and the prominent position of sacred feasts and food miracles in religious art. The primary focus is on Western art, but examples from other traditions are considered.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Art History

In this advanced lecture, the first wave of Gothic novels from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th century is examined in relation to visual representations of issues that dominate Gothic discourse. Topics include horror, imprisonment, madness, gender, ghosts and vampires. Authors and artists studied include Austen, the Brontë sisters, Radcliffe, Collins, Blake, Fuseli, and Turner.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

Do photographic images have privileged access to truth? This course explores the complicated relationship between truth and visual (particularly filmic) images. It begins with Plato on the “fakery” that is painting, turns to 17th-century “faithfulness” and “sincerity” in still-life painting and scientific drawing, and looks in depth at 20th-century writings about the nature of photography and realism in representation.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

What, if any, moral and political obligations does art have? Should public policy promote some kinds of art and discourage others? This course addresses these and related questions via works from across the arts and philosophical texts.

Credits: 4

Department: Art History

In this survey of the historical significance of printmaking, the focus is on understanding the history of print media and its influence on culture in Europe, Asia, and the New World. Students explore both the history of printmaking and its intertwined relationship to the history of art. Of prime concern are the unique and distinct characteristics of each printmaking process.

Credits: 3

Department: Art History

College and Expository Writing

Description:

The ability to express ideas clearly and effectively in writing is essential to success as a student and citizen.

Students learn and practice these skills throughout their academic career at Purchase College, beginning with College Writing (WRI 1110) in their first year. College Writing teaches students to:

  1. produce strong written work at the college level
  2. read and think critically
  3. take a position and develop an argument of their own
  4. research a topic and write a well-organized paper that develops their claims in dialogue with the sources
  5. revise and improve their papers
  6. present their ideas orally

College Writing is taught in small sections in a seminar/discussion format that requires students to achieve proficiency in speaking and listening as well as writing and reading.

Entering students may only be exempted from College Writing by achieving an AP score of 4 or higher. For additional information, refer to the College Writing AP policy for freshmen.

English as an Additional Language

Courses in English as an additional language (EAL) are also offered under the auspices of the college writing program.


Faculty

  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, University of Central Florida
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Professor of Music
    • BM, University of Michigan
    • MM, Mannes College of Music
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Hunter College, City University of New York
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, DePaul University
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Pace University
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Chair of College Writing
    • BA, California State University, Northridge
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
    • JD, Villanova University
  • Lecturer in Writing
    Assistant Director, Advising Center
    • MusB, MM, Purchase College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Yale University
    • MPS, Manhattanville College
  • Professor of Practice
    • BA, Oberlin College
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Pennsylvania State University
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
    • MEd, Temple University
    • EdD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Wayne State University
    • MPS, Manhattanville College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, University of Michigan
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, Occidental College
    • MA, California State University, Los Angeles
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • BA, York College, City University of New York
    • MFA, Sarah Lawrence College
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA (Honors), University of Delhi (India)
    • MA, MPhil, PhD, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of Literature
    • BA, Queens College, City University of New York
    • MA, PhD, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Writing
    • AB, Princeton University
    • JD, New York University School of Law
  • Associate Professor of Literature and Writing
    Chair, School of Humanities
    • BA, MA, PhD, Columbia University

Courses

Students receive supplemental instruction in critical thinking and writing, writing mechanics, organization, and style. They also learn techniques for effective workshopping and provide regular feedback on each other’s work.

Credits: 1

Department: Expository and College Writing

The ability to express ideas clearly and effectively in writing is essential to success as a student and citizen. Students learn and practice these skills throughout their academic career at Purchase College, beginning with College Writing. This is an intensive course that teaches students to:

  1. produce strong written work at the college level
  2. read and think critically
  3. take a position and develop an argument of their own
  4. research a topic and write a well-organized paper that develops their claims in dialogue with the sources
  5. revise and improve their papers
  6. present their ideas orally

Credits: 4

Department: Expository and College Writing

What makes a person an insider or an outsider? Beginning with personal experience and writing, students explore the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class affect individual, communal, national, and transnational identity and belonging in American culture. In connecting multiple levels of experience, students engage in critical reading, research, analysis, writing, and revision, building on their strong skills in preparation for upper-level work.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: Or WRI1110

Department: Expository and College Writing

Though often seen as simply a test of students’ knowledge and ideas, essays go far beyond what is generally required in courses. Students in this course read and experiment with a wide variety of critical, journalistic, academic, personal, and experimental essay forms. In the process, they further develop their skills as critical thinkers and writers.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: WRI1110 Or WRI2110

Department: Expository and College Writing

In the personal essay, writers adopt distinct points of view, moving beyond the emotional to analytical and reasoned positions. Topics can include personal reflections, thoughts on daily life, art analysis, and political arguments. Students read and analyze contemporary essays and “workshop” each other’s writing. Requirements include attending instructor-supervised events (films, performances, guest speakers) outside of class for some writing assignments.

Credits: 4

Department: Expository and College Writing

English as an Additional Language

Students develop basic language skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. They learn components of academic writing, including paragraphs and thesis statements, and gain critical reading and analytical skills through work with basic texts. Students share ideas and experiences both verbally and in writing, and improve grammar and vocabulary through writing activities, academic exercises, and workshops.

Credits: 4

Department: Undeclared

Students gain advanced language skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Working with more advanced texts, they further develop critical reading and analytical skills. They gain experience with the essay form, and learn to write definition, process analysis, descriptive, and opinion pieces. Students share ideas and experiences both verbally and in writing, and continue to strengthen grammar and vocabulary.

Credits: 4

Department: Undeclared

Students develop advanced language skills through reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Working with advanced texts, they further develop critical reading and analytical skills. They gain experience with academic writing, including cause and effect, comparative, narrative, and opinion pieces, and learn basic research skills. Students practice analyzing information and expressing ideas verbally and in writing, and continue to strengthen grammar and vocabulary.

Credits: 4

Department: Undeclared

Creative Writing

Description:

The Lilly Lieb Port creative writing program is a highly selective and structured BA program that shares features of the college’s arts programs.

The purpose of this program is to offer motivated, talented, and committed students a dynamic context and community in which to explore all aspects of creative writing.

As an integral part of the program, readings are held each semester by students, faculty, alumni who have published their writing, and professional writers. Editors and other members of the publishing world are also invited to speak and share their expertise with students.

Italics Mine (italicsmine.com), a student-run literary journal under the stewardship of the creative writing program, showcases the talent and diversity of Purchase College students by publishing original art, fiction, poetry, and nonfiction in print and online.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Creative writing majors are encouraged to apply to the college’s summer program in France, where they will participate in an intensive writing workshop, drawing on explorations of the surroundings for material.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, creative writing majors must complete a minimum of nine courses and an 8-credit senior project (45–47 credits total) as follows. The foundation courses and the two genre courses must be completed with a grade of B or higher:

  • CWR 1000/Poetic Techniques: 4 credits*
  • CWR 1100/Narrative Techniques: 4 credits*
  • Two courses in the student’s chosen genre (poetry or fiction): 8 credits*
    CWR 2400/Poetry Writing I and CWR 3400/Poetry Writing II
    or
    CWR 2500/Fiction Writing I and CWR 3500/Fiction Writing II
    *Must be completed with a grade of B or higher.
  • Two upper-level creative writing electives from the list below: 8 credits
    CWR 3200/Art of the Novella
    CWR 3450/ Poets at Work: First Books
    CWR 3110/Writing Home
    CWR 3125/ Alternate Worlds
    CWR 3215 and CWR 3220/ Editing and Production Workshop (year-long sequential course in Editing and Production).
  • Two literature courses, chosen from an approved list: 7–8 credits
  • Arts-related course(s): 3–4 credits
  • CWR 4000/Special Topics in Creative Writing: 3 credits
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Note: A semester of study abroad is strongly recommended.

Examples of Literature Courses
Literature courses that fulfill the requirement for the major are those in which a broad array of writers are studied. Courses in the following list are subject to change, and new courses may be added. Students should consult with their faculty advisor when choosing literature courses.

FRE 3230/The Island as Laboratory
LIT 2100/Freedom Dreams: Introduction to African American Literature
LIT 2235/Animals and the Environment
LIT 2305/Contemporary Global Literature
LIT 2570/Survey of U.S. Literature II
LIT 2775/From Beowulf to Lucifer
LIT 2776/Survey of British Literature II: From Patronage to Print Culture
LIT 3007/Visions of Dystopia
LIT 3082/19th Century British Literature and Empire
LIT 3095/Literature of Race and Human Rights
LIT 3160/Literature of the High Middle Ages
LIT 3226/Literatue of Decolonization in South Asia
LIT 3228/Decolonizing Sex and Gender
LIT 3315/19th Century Novel in the U.S.
LIT 3340/Romanticism II
LIT 3369/Victorian Poetry
LIT 3380/Harlem Renaissance
LIT 3415/Global Metafictions
LIT 3420/Modern Poetry
LIT 3427/20th Century World Literature
LIT 3532/Body, Race, Performance
LIT 3620/U.S. Poetry
LIT 3627/American Beserk: Religion, Drugs, and Terrorism in Recent Fiction
LIT 3665/American Women Writers
LIT 3685/Modern Novel of Latin America
LIT 3755/Poetry and the Avant Garde
LIT 3823/Anxiety and Monstrosity in Early British Literature
LIT 3950/Literature of War
LIT 4690/Contemporary U.S. Poetry
SPA 3700/The Latin American Short Story*
THP 3140/Medieval and Renaissance English Drama

*Taught in Spanish
Examples of Arts-Related Courses
Courses in the following list are subject to change, and new courses may be added. Students should consult with their faculty advisor when choosing arts-related courses.
Conservatory of Music:
MUS 1250/ Chorus*
MUS 3370/ Acoustics and Design*
MTH 3180/Electroacoustic Music*
Conservatory of Theatre Arts:
ACT 3004/Creative Expression
THP 3050/ Voice and Speech Essentials
TDT 3008/Costume Design Seen Through Film
THP 3140/Transmedia and Performance
School of Art+Design:
VIS 1060/ Foundation Drawing
VIS 1330/ Lens and Time
VIS 1080/ Visual Language
SCP 2110/ Thinking in Three Dimensions
SCP 3530/ Animation
SCP 3006/Introduction to Video Art*
SCP 3155/Performance Art
SCP 3650/Immersive Sound Architectures
VIS 3000/Art in the Age of Electronic Media

*Please note: this course only carries 2 of the required 3 credits

Sequence of Study

All creative writing majors follow a sequence of courses, whether their chosen genre is poetry or fiction:

  1. To encourage an awareness of and sensitivity to the various aspects of the craft of creative writing, students are required to take the introductory courses, CWR 1000 and 1100, in their first year of study.
  2. In the second year, poetry students move on to CWR 2400/Poetry Writing I, then to CWR 3400/Poetry Writing II, while fiction writing students take CWR 2500/Fiction Writing I, followed by CWR 3500/Fiction Writing II.
  3. After completing this course sequence, students have the opportunity to study for one semester with a writer-in-residence. In addition, advanced tutorials are available on a regular basis, emphasizing continuous, close work on revision and editing skills. In the most advanced classes, students begin to explore the fiction and poetry market. A component of advanced study may also include experience in editorial and copyediting techniques as preparation for work in the publishing industries.
  4. Students take CWR 4000/Special Topics in Creative Writing in the fall of their senior year, in tandem with the first semester of their senior project.

Updates to the 2020-21 Catalog

Effective Fall 2020:

CWR 3200 no longer satisfies the fiction genre course requirement
Arts-Related Courses list expanded beyond upper-level courses


Faculty

  • Professor of Creative Writing
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Creative Writing
    • BA, Ramapo College
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor of Creative Writing
    • BA, Connecticut College
    • MFA, Purdue University
  • Lecturer in Creative Writing
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Creative Writing
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MFA, Columbia University

  • Professor of Creative Writing
    • BA, Fontbonne College
    • PhD, Florida State University
  • Lecturer in Creative Writing
    • MFA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Minnesota

Courses

Introduces the essentials of poetry writing, including poetic form and forms (traditional and unconventional), line structures and rhythms, figures of speech, and other elements of rhetoric, voice, and subject matter. Regular writing exercises are the heart of the course, emphasizing problems to solve and techniques to master. Reading and study of important poetic models accompanies the poetry writing. Students produce a portfolio of original poems by the end of the semester.

Credits: 4

Department: Creative Writing

This introductory course in creative writing allows students to explore various genres. Poetry, the short story, and memoir are among the forms discussed. Students should be prepared to write, revise, and share portions of their work with other members of the class, and to read a selection of works by contemporary authors.

Credits: 3

Department: Creative Writing

An introduction to the fundamental aspects of fiction writing, including dialogue, plot, point of view, character development, detail, and voice. Starting from a series of writing exercises and analyses of published stories, students explore the techniques involved in creating effective fiction, using these as a springboard to complete a short story.

Credits: 4

Department: Creative Writing

In this introduction to creative nonfiction, students explore a variety of forms within the genre, including personal narrative, memoir, reportage, and the lyric essay. Students also write and workshop their own original essays.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR1000 And CWR1100

Department: Creative Writing

Students begin to study and practice poetic strategies, producing a poem per week in response to assigned exercises. Students also develop skills in critiquing by commenting on each others’ work and by reading and discussing the work of established poets. Permission of Instructor required.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR1000 Or CWR1050

Department: Creative Writing

While continuing to explore narrative strategies, students write and submit several short stories during the semester. Students also learn the fundamentals of critiquing as they discuss their work and that of published writers. Permission of Instructor required.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR1050 Or (CWR1000 And CWR1100 )

Department: Creative Writing

Using the French location and selected readings related to the region, students explore the contexts and their responses through writing. Students meet at various locations, from castles and ruins to a local café, and receive writing assignments that draw on place and setting. Each week, students select one of their on-the-spot works to revise and develop into a short piece of fiction for submission. Emphasis is on capturing the nuances of one’s surroundings and experiences of these surroundings, and on how to use setting as a main “character“ in writing. Summer (offered in France)

Credits: 4

Department: Creative Writing

Often, to leave home is to truly see it. This course explores how writers craft “home” in their fiction. Whether crossing literal or figurative borders, the impulse for home is at the heart of character desire. Students will read the work of diverse writers as they write home in their own fiction.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR1100 And CWR1000 And CWR2500 And CWR3500

Department: Creative Writing

This writing workshop draws on a variety of texts, media, and film as students explore fictional portrayals of other worlds. In their writing assignments, students focus on elements that contribute to effective narratives—setting, character, situation, etcetera—in order to create alternate realities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR2500

Department: Creative Writing

What makes the novella work? What power does the form offer that the short story and longer novel do not? Is there a subject matter best suited to such brevity? Students examine these questions through close reading of works by new and established writers (e.g., James, Conrad, Moore), and begin to structure and write their own novella.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR2500

Department: Creative Writing

Students are guided through the classical questions of form and style, the building materials of the personal essay, through reading and writing assignments. Students examine the elements that convince the reader of the truth of their tales and explore how to confront their own experiences creatively. Readings are various, but with a focus on the 20th-century essay in English.

Credits: 4

Department: Creative Writing

Focusing on the art of editing, students learn best editing practices through a practical and historical context of the literary journal landscape in the U.S. Students apply their skills to editing content to be published in the creative writing program’s literary magazine, Italics Mine.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR1000 Or CWR1010 Or CWR1100

Department: Creative Writing

Through hands-on collaboration, students apply their editing skills to the production of the creative writing program¹s literary journal, Italics Mine. From shaping manuscripts to layout and design, marketing, and public relations, students work as editors on the publication of the journal.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR3215

Department: Creative Writing

This course assumes that students have a good command of basic poetic craft. Writing assignments put increased emphasis on students’ own work, though there are still exercises to guide the workshop, as well as study and discussion of poetry by established writers.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR2400

Department: Creative Writing

How does a poet’s attitude or stance towards her or his subject create tone or voice in a poem? In this workshop, students read and analyze a range of poetry to understand the linguistic and syntactic underpinnings of tone, including its relationship to line break and simile. Poets include Louise Gluck, Marie Howe, Billy Collins, Tony Hoagland, Jane Kenyon, Brenda Hillman, Eamon Grennan, W.H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, and T.S. Eliot.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR2400

Department: Creative Writing

Students interact with contemporary poets who have recently published their first poetry book or chapbook. Most classes are structured as a brief reading by and discussion with visiting authors. Topics include each author’s influences, how one assembles a collection, how manuscripts evolve over time, and the editorial/publishing process. Students read each poet’s collection and compose critical and creative responses.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: CWR1000

Department: Creative Writing

This course assumes a working knowledge of the craft. Students write and discuss short stories or chapters from a novel in progress, and continue to refine their critiquing skills through discussion of their own work as well as published stories. Revision of submitted work is an important component of this course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR2500

Department: Creative Writing

A series of mini-workshops, guest speakers, and activities focused on current trends in the field and on broader topics germane to students in their senior year.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: CWR3400 Or CWR3500 Or CWR3200 Or CWR3200

Department: Creative Writing

Taught by a well-published writer-in-residence. Students work intensively on revising and editing their own work and each other’s fiction, as well as on critiquing published stories and novels. The course also familiarizes students with the professional writer’s market and the submission process, in order to encourage each student to prepare at least one story for possible publication.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR3200 Or CWR3500

Department: Creative Writing

Advanced students with practiced skills in poetry writing and criticism work to produce poems of publishable stature. Students should be able to assume full responsibility for their creative process in this course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CWR3400

Department: Creative Writing

This course explores stories that employ alternative forms of narrative design (i.e. non-linear, episodic, parallel, multiple point-of-view) to establish form—the pattern of a story’s assembly, its arrangement and structure. Writers often think of plot as defining structure in a story. However, craft elements like point of view, tone, time, place etc. when employed structurally, can achieve meaning and design.

Credits: 4

Department: Creative Writing

History

Description:

The goal of the history major at Purchase College is to provide students with the intellectual foundation of a liberal arts education that is suitable for a wide variety of professions, including law, education, government, business, journalism, and public relations.

The history curriculum seeks to foster the development of a historical perspective on the forces and processes that have shaped and continue to shape our communities, our country, and the world at large.

In keeping with the cultural resources of our area and the special profile of Purchase, the history program has generally, though not exclusively, emphasized the social, intellectual, and cultural dimensions of the historical discipline.

  • Students may define their area of interest within the major in terms of nine broadly conceived areas.
  • When appropriate, students may also pursue topics of special interest through tutorials and directed independent studies, which may be arranged with individual instructors.
  • Coursework in the history program includes intensive writing and an emphasis on primary source material, which can range from government documents to diaries, novels, and films.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all history majors must complete seven history courses, plus a junior seminar and an 8-credit senior project (37–40 credits total):

  • The broad survey courses at the 2000 level serve as the foundation for more specialized work at the 3000 level.
  • All history majors are required to take the Junior History Seminar in the spring semester of their junior year. This course is open exclusively to history majors.
  • All history majors will be assigned a senior project advisor by the end of their junior year, and are required to register with this advisor for 4 credits of senior project (SPJ 4990/Senior Project I) in the fall of their senior year, and 4 more credits (SPJ 4991/Senior Project II) in the spring of their senior year.

Areas of Interest

  • History majors normally take four or five elective courses that are clustered within an area of special interest to the student. At least three of these courses must be at the upper (3000–4000) level.
  • History majors must also take at least two or three elective history courses outside their area of interest. At least one of these must be at the upper (3000–4000) level.
  • The student’s area of interest within the major should be developed in consultation with a faculty advisor at the beginning of the junior year, and must be approved by the board of study. Normally, a student will select from among the following nine areas:

    1. American history
    2. Ancient and medieval history
    3. Asian studies
    4. Early modern history
    5. European history
    6. Jewish history
    7. Latin American history
    8. Modern history
    9. Women’s history

Summary of Academic Requirements

A total of seven history courses, plus the junior seminar and the 8-credit senior project:

  1. HIS —/Seven history courses as follows (25–28 credits):
    a. Four or five history courses in an area of interest (including three at the 3000–4000 level)
    b. Two or three history courses outside the area of interest (including one at the 3000–4000 level)
  2. HIS 3880/Junior History Seminar (spring semester, junior year): 4 credits
  3. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  4. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Minor requirements:

The minor in history is designed for students who wish to supplement coursework in another major with an array of history courses.

It is particularly suited for students who have an interest in one period or a specific area (for example, early modern or modern history; European, American, or Asian history).

Students interested in the minor should consult with the coordinator of the History Board of Study and complete an Application for a Program of Minor Study. They will then be assigned an appropriate advisor to help plan their minor program.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in History

At least five courses, three of which must be at the 3000 level or above.

Related Minors:

Asian Studies
Contemplative Studies
Gender Studies
Global Black Studies
Jewish Studies
Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX Studies
Museum Studies


Faculty

  • Assistant Professor of History
    • BA, University of Oxford (England)
    • MA, University of Sussex (England)
    • PhD, Yale University
  • Associate Professor of History
    • BA, St. Joseph’s University
    • MA, Fordham University
    • MPhil, PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Professor of History
    • BA, Bryn Mawr College
    • MA, PhD, University of Chicago
  • Lecturer in History
    • BA, St. Joseph’s University
    • MTh, University of Edinburgh (Scotland)
    • MPhil, Fordham University
    • PhD, Fordham University
  • Professor of History
    • BA, Vassar College
    • PhD, University of Cambridge (England)
  • Lecturer in History
    • BS, Cornell University
    • MA, Fordham University
    • PhD, Fordham University
  • Lecturer in History
    • BA, International Studies College (Beijing, China)
    • MA, Shanghai Normal University
    • MA, University of Minnesota
  • Assistant Professor of History
    • BA, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)
    • PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Lecturer in History
    • BA, MA, Fordham University
    • PhD, Graduate Center, City University of New York
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies and History
    Director, School of Film and Media Studies
    • PhD, University of Maryland
  • Lecturer in History
    • BA, Sarah Lawrence College
    • MA, PhD, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in Liberal Studies and African History
    • BS, MA, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
    • PhD, Binghamton University, SUNY
  • Professor of History
    • BA, Sun Yat-sen University (China)
    • MA, University of California, Los Angeles
    • PhD, New York University

Courses

Introduces various aspects of Chinese culture (e.g., values, customs, manners, and festivals) and discusses everyday life in contemporary Chinese society.

Credits: 3

Department: History

An intensive focus on the intersection between cinema and history. Students examine the debates around cinema’s status as historical document, surveying different approaches to the relationship between cinematic formal traditions and social history. The course emphasizes the analysis of primary sources, such as reviews, posters, magazine and newspaper articles, personal correspondence, trade publications, and blogs.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: History

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Students discuss and analyze films in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CIN1500 And CIN1510

Department: History

Historical trauma has characterized the 20th century. Traumatic events return in unexpected forms, haunting communities and shaping both collective memory and mourning practices. Taking a comparative approach across national cinemas, this course analyzes the historical context, style, and narratives of films that circle around the question of trauma. The course covers German, Israeli, Chilean, Japanese, Russian, and American cinemas.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The ancient world to the beginning of the modern world at 1500 AD: an amalgamation of Celtic, Jewish, Greek, Roman, and German historical traditions.

Credits: 4

Department: History

A study of texts and events that have shaped Western society and culture since 1500.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Combines a history of the discovery and excavation of famous archaeological sites worldwide with an introduction to archaeological methodology. Students explore the role that material culture plays in understanding social, political, and economic systems and examine the role of archaeologist as interpreter of the past.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Spotlights moments when history became the focus of wider social debate, including the trial of Adolf Eichmann, a trial involving Holocaust denier David Irving and an academic historian, and the debates that took place between historians concerning the invasion of Iraq. This course illustrates that, by reflecting on fundamental questions about history—how evidence is used, who has agency in history, how people make moral judgments—citizens are better equipped to confront contemporary political and social issues.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the history of the United States from European colonization and initial contact with Native Americans through the Civil War. Subjects include the diversity of settlement experiences; European-Native American relations; the development of slavery; the causes and consequences of the American Revolution; social, political, and cultural changes in the 18th and 19th centuries; the sectional crisis; and the significance of the Civil War.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Examines the history of the United States from Reconstruction through the end of the 20th century. Subjects include changes in race and gender relations; industrialization, urbanization, and suburbanization; the emergence of new social and political movements; the impact of war on American institutions; and America’s rise to world power.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Students explore objects, behaviors, and ideas to learn about the daily lives and worldviews of three foundational early American cultures: Native American, African American, and European. This course draws heavily on visual and aural materials as well as artifacts to illustrate the ideas and physical realities that shaped early American art and architecture, music, food, landscapes, domestic interiors, family relationships, and pastimes.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Dive into a more than 400-year study of “America’s First Great River.” Discover why, where, and how the Hudson River region has had—and continues to have—a vital role in shaping American history and society. The region’s history is examined through a selection of such themes as culture, exploration, art, literature, economics, industry, transportation, international relations, and the environment.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An introductory survey of the history of Latin America from colonial times to the present. Topics include geography, indigenous peoples, colonization and nation formation, society, politics, economy and culture of contemporary Latin America, and its place in today’s world.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Topics in history to be determined each semester.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Explores major social, cultural, economic, and political developments in Latin America from the period following the Wars of Independence to the present. The historical roots of such problems as racism, persistent poverty, and political repression are examined, focusing on “subaltern” groups (e.g., peasants, workers, women, and people of color).

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the ancient civilizations of the Middle East, including those of Egypt, Israel, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and Iran. Students examine cultural, social, and political movements using texts as well as archaeology as sources.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines how early Jewish interactions with various cultures affected the development of Judaism. Interactions with Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Christian, and Muslim cultures are explored. Topics include conflicts with external powers, exile, and diaspora.

Credits: 4

Department: History

A survey of the history of Europe in the Middle Ages (1000–1400). Topics include the expansion of the frontiers of European civilization, the changing forms of intellectual and religious life, and the growth of towns and trade.

Credits: 3

Department: History

An introductory survey of the history of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonization of the Americas from 1450 to 1810, i.e., from the late preconquest period to the Latin American struggle for independence. Lectures, readings, and discussions provide an overview of the economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of colonization.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the origins of modern Europe from the Renaissance in Italy through the Protestant Reformation and the age of religious wars, using both primary source readings and secondary historical scholarship.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Focuses on the history of Latinos in urban centers across the U.S. and Latin America. Students explore how Latinos established and maintained distinctive social and cultural identities in the Americas. The historical definition of “Latinidad” is also discussed through the study of colonization, immigration, diaspora, globalization, and the history of the racialization of Latin American descendants.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the political and social transformation of Europe between the religious wars of the 16th century and the French Revolution. Topics include the growth of commercial capitalism and the scientific revolution.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Examines the history of Asia and its peoples’ interactions with each other and with other nations in the world, focusing on major issues in modern and contemporary times. Asian views and perspectives are introduced and discussed.

Credits: 3

Department: History

The invention of sound recording in the late 1800s caused profound aesthetic transformations in music. This course surveys the many styles that have swept through American music—from parlor songs, ragtime, blues, and brass band through R&B, top 40, heavy metal, rap, and hip-hop—and discusses the roles of rural and urban musical centers. Using the last 125 years of technological innovation in recording, students analyze the more significant cultural changes that continue to reverberate throughout American society.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores migration and immigration from 1830 to the present. Major subjects include Native American removal and genocide, the intersection of migration and slavery, immigration exclusion, and race and the making of illegal immigration. Students examine long patterns of U.S. legislative policies alongside on-the-ground experiences and reactions to migration and immigration. The course concludes with an analysis of immigration in the post-9/11 era.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Covers European institutions, traditions, economies, geopolitical boundaries, and the essential social and intellectual framework of the mid-18th to the mid-19th century. Critical changes and events covered include the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, Napoleon, the revolutions of 1848, romanticism, nationalism, and communism. Readings consist of extensive primary source materials in addition to secondary works.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Focuses on the prehistory of the Americas from the first peoples through 1492, beginning with the Ice Age cultures of the New World and moving forward chronologically. South, Central, and North American cultures are examined, including the Olmec, Woodlands, and Mississippi Valley cultures, pueblo culture, and the Maya, Aztec, and Inca.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the encounters and interactions of the major populations who lived on the landmasses rimming the Atlantic Ocean (native peoples, Africans, and Europeans) from 1450 to 1888. Topics include migration, religion, slaves and enslavement, lived lives and material culture, foodways and folkways, the age of revolutions, and the fight for abolition.

Credits: 4

Department: History

How are we to understand the century that has just ended? This course examines the political, social, and ideological forces that have shaped Europe since World War I. Special attention is paid to the impact of war and revolution, economic change, the Nazi dictatorship, the Cold War and its demise, and the changing role of Europe in world affairs.

Credits: 3

Department: History

In this examination of the turbulent decade of the 1960s, students explore key social, political, economic, and cultural issues of the era. Specific topics include various struggles for civil rights and social equality; the escalation of the U.S. presence in Vietnam; the sexual revolution; the vision and limitations of the Great Society; and the rise of the New Right.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Covers the experience of American women from colonial times to the 20th century, from political, social, religious, cultural, and economic points of view.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Covers the history of Brazil from independence to the present. During this period, Brazil has transformed from a colonial, agrarian, slave society to a predominantly urban, industrialized nation and an aspiring world power. Students explore slavery, racism, urban life, immigration and industrialization, changing gender roles, political repression and military rule, carnaval and popular culture.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An introduction to modern Japanese history, from the end of the Tokugawa period in the mid-19th century to the present. Japanese imperialism, Japan’s spectacular economic growth after World War II, and U.S.-Japanese relations are discussed.

Credits: 3

Department: History

A survey of social, economic, and political history from the ratification of the Constitution through the “crisis” of the 1890s. Topics include republicanism and competing visions of “America”; economic development and class conflict; slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction; continental expansion and the settlement of the West; and urbanization and the origins of consumer culture.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Explores African civilizations from the ninth millennium BCE to the 16th century CE. The diverse regions of ancient Africa are studied using archaeology, written and oral history, linguistics, art, and science, following cultural development in simple societies, states, and empires. Ancient Africa is presented in global context in terms of past civilizations but also in modern scholarship, identity, and popular media.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Covers the history and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations, classical antiquity, the Hellenistic period, Etruscan civilization, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire, Roman interactions with neighbors, the birth of Christianity, and the early years of the Byzantine Empire. This course also addresses how to read primary sources, the historiography of antiquity, and how to use archaeological sources.

Credits: 4

Department: History

How was the Holocaust possible in the 20th century? This course responds to the question by examining specific issues: German anti-Semitism; Hitler’s rise to power; the genocide process; responses to Nazism and the news of the Holocaust in Jewish and international communities; resistance and collaboration; and theological and moral questions.

Credits: 4

Department: History

A survey of Chinese arts and culture that introduces approaches to and connoisseurship of painting, calligraphy, sculpture, gardens, and architecture in dynamic relation to dynastic changes, literati-scholar tradition, cosmological and aesthetic concepts, and influences of Taoism and Buddhism during the period 221 BC to 1950. Knowledge of Chinese language is not required or expected.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Investigates the fascinating and complex social, economic, cultural, and political history of South Asia, focusing primarily on the Mughal Empire, British colonial rule in India, and the contemporary nation-states of India and Pakistan. Course materials include introductory history texts, speeches, primary source documents, photographs, musical clips, recipes, short stories, and films.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Examines the histories of China, Japan, and Korea from the disintegration of the traditional order through the transition to modern nation states. Asian views and perspectives are introduced and discussed.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Considers the profound influence Judaism, Christianity, and Islam have exerted on the social, cultural, and political history of the East and the West. This course examines the historical developments, tenets, and scriptures of the three religions.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Cinematic representations of Latinos and Latinas are explored as crucial elements in the configuration of “America” as a national community, taking into account key historical moments in the relationship between the United States and Latin America.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Public history—history museums, historic houses and landscapes, objects, documentary films—reaches and educates millions of Americans. Students explore how these experiences evolve through time and take part in activities related to handling and interpreting the past. Hands-on learning projects and several off-campus lectures at local historic sites are a critical dimension of this course.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The U.S. in the 1920s and 1930s. Topics include Prohibition; the New Morality; fundamentalism; the KKK and immigration restriction; African American migration and culture; causes and social effects of the Great Depression; FDR and the New Deal; popular culture; radical challenges; the coming of World War II.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines European social, political, and cultural developments since the 1950s through history, sociology, literature, and film. Themes include the Cold War, the evolution of the Common Market, youth, women and feminism, consumerism, immigration and labor migration, national identity, attitudes towards America, and Germany and Eastern Europe since the collapse of the Soviet bloc.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the founding and development of the British colonies in North America and the causes of the American Revolution. The course considers the political, social, religious, and institutional history of colonial America through 1783.

Credits: 4

Department: History

In recent years, a growing number of cultural historians have taken inspiration from psychologists, anthropologists, and sociologists and explored whether emotions have a history and, in turn, make history. Studying diaries, memoirs, and personal letters alongside normative and public texts such as advice literature, scientific works, and court cases, students assess how shifting ideas and experiences of emotions have affected individuals¹ self-understandings and provoked wider social change.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Focuses on the relationship between cities, urban life, and form, and the construction of social and political rights in the Americas. The emphasis is on how cities and citizenship are mutually constituted historically, looking at ideas and policies that regulate the city, and how urbanites produce and consume urban space and claim their rights as citizens and urban residents.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Is the United States now, or has it ever been, an empire? Students explore this question and others as they examine diplomatic, political, economic, and cultural aspects of U.S. foreign relations since the Spanish American War in 1898. The lecture/discussion format draws upon fiction, films, and other images, as well as traditional historical writing.

Credits: 4

Department: History

A narrative survey of U.S. history from the colonial period to the present through an exploration of its musical history. The course investigates America’s fundamental principles of politics, its primary social issues, and its wealth of aesthetic musical initiatives. Students examine the unity, diversity, originality, and adaptability of significant political, social, and musical institutions.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An overview of the development and tradition of Chinese cinema through representative screenings of important films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the historical and political context(s) that informed the creation and reception of these films and learn critical scholarly terminology and historical issues related to the analysis of Chinese film.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the main historical events in the Mediterranean area from late antiquity through the Renaissance. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam were born here, and the diverse peoples and cultures around its shores competed for intellectual and political dominance. These interactions resulted in the legacy of beliefs and institutions at the core of Western culture, including some issues still unresolved today.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An exploration of the relationships between orthodox religions and heretical sects in the medieval West and how heterodoxy evolved into the witch-craze of the early modern period. Questions of gender, spirituality, repression, and interpretation are examined in light of their effects on society and established religion. Focuses are on Islamic, Jewish, and Christian relations in medieval Europe; the development and perception of certain heretical sects; the discernment of saints and spirits; Protestant and Catholic Reformations; and the persecution of witches.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines how war changed gender relations in 20th-century Europe. For instance, how did mobilization reinforce or undermine masculine and feminine norms? How did total wars that blurred the line between fighting front and home front challenge notions of chivalry and turn noncombatants into warriors of sorts? Did new job opportunities outweigh the trauma and grief suffered by women during wartime?

Credits: 4

Department: History

A team-taught course in British society and cultural development from World War I to the present, examined from the different perspectives of literature and history. Topics include war and social change, construction of class and gender, evolution of the state, intellectuals and politics, popular culture since 1945, feminism, and immigration and race. Readings in history and the works of such authors as Virginia Woolf are complemented by the viewing of films.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the history of American Jewry from its beginnings to the present, touching on such topics as integration into American society, formation of Jewish identity, anti-Semitism, evolving religious traditions, cultural clashes, cultural issues involving various waves of immigration, the evolving role of women, Jews and entertainment, and economic and political issues.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An exploration of gender issues in the ancient world. Beginning with the ancient Near East and the biblical world in particular, students discuss portrayals of women, as well as their actual roles in society. Using textual and archaeological evidence, the course branches out to the related cultures of Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An exploration of the peoples, religions, cultures, places, and monuments of the land of Israel. Home to three major world religions, the land has been embraced, fought over, and conquered repeatedly throughout history. Why? Students explore the reasons for Israel’s prominence and discover how its position and importance in the worldview is constantly being reinvented.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The historicity of the Hebrew Bible is explored, from the protohistory of the Israelites as related through the Pentateuch and early prophetic works, through the period of the Monarchies, to the 6th-century B.C. exile, the birth of early Judaism, and the books of prophets and writings. Issues relating to historiography and biblical criticism are essential elements in this course.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Major trends in the intellectual history of Europe from the latter part of the 17th century through the end of the 18th century, including changing perceptions of the relationship of the individual (male and female) to society, in the context of social change.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An introduction to the history and culture of New York City. New York’s colonial origins, its critical role in the American Revolution, and its 19th-century ethnic and social conflicts are studied. Secondly, the evolution of the city’s dynamic growth in the 20th century and the impact of 9/11 are examined. Lastly, the image of New York City as portrayed in literature and film is explored.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Decades after its end, the legacy of the Vietnam war—America’s second longest war and a defining episode in its history—is still felt and hotly debated. Using documents, memoirs, fiction, poetry, song, and film, this course explores the war’s origins, development, ultimate conclusion, and aftermath, while paying special attention to those who experienced it both “in country” and at home.

Credits: 4

Department: History

A comparative view of revolutions and revolutionaries in 18th-century America, France, Britain, and Holland. Both documents and secondary literature show the origins and development of democratic revolutions.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explore the vast experiences of women in medieval Western Europe from the end of the Roman Empire (500) to the beginning of the Early Modern Era (1500). Students will analyze both societal expectations and the daily realities of what it meant to be a woman in rural villages, larger towns, in religious and secular spheres, in the home and outside it, as marginalized members of society and as major political actors. Sources of study will include recent historiography on women’s history in medieval Europe, modern feminist theory, and primary source materials such as legal and religious writings, literature, and proscriptive manuals on running a household.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the role of Chinese literature in relation to politics. Readings include masterpieces of modern Chinese literature in translation and a couple of typical “propaganda pieces.” The class also sees, discusses, and compares several Chinese films.

Credits: 4

Department: History

A general historical survey of the relations between the United States and East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam) from the mid-19th century to the present. The course examines the roots of the diplomatic, political, and cultural interactions and conflicts across the Pacific Ocean.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The historical relationship of Judaism and Christianity and the encounter of the Jewish and Christian communities from ancient to contemporary times are examined. Topics include the split between the two religions in late antiquity, medieval disputations, and the challenges of the modern period. Students also examine the varying ways in which texts can be interpreted.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the relationship between politics and archaeology. Topics include who owns antiquities; fakes, forgeries, and the manipulating of history; presentations of archaeology to the public; buying, selling, and auctioning of antiquities; and archaeology in wartime. The geographic range of topics includes Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Syria, and other countries in region, as well as Greece and Rome.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Students explore the underlying historical narratives of films from 1930 to 1960 that address topics from early America. These narratives are compared to the ways Hollywood recast historical lessons to suit modern circumstances and to promote “American values” challenged by economic depression and the rise of fascism and communism. Special emphasis is on the works of Ford and Capra.

Credits: 4

Department: History

History of U.S.–Latin American relations from the mid-19th century to the present day. It explores how Latin America and the Caribbean became the object of US intervention into the region’s realities and how Latin American societies involved into nationalist, anti-imperialist, class, racial, and gender struggles that shaped policy outcomes in ways unanticipated by the US.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An exploration of the legacies of imperialism through the dual perspectives of history and literature. Readings include literary and historical texts, films, and essays that illuminate the key terms: global, empire, and modern.

Credits: 4

Department: History

European cultural and intellectual history are examined by focusing on three “storm centers of modern culture”: Paris in the 1860s and 1870s, fin de siècle Vienna, and Berlin in the 1920s. Topics include representations of bourgeois society in art and literature; psychoanalysis; and the auditory and visual revolution in mass culture produced by film, radio, photography, and recorded sound.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Analyzes political, social, and cultural developments in 19th-century England through a wide variety of historical, literary, and other contemporary writings.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Introduces students to cultural and political history in Latin America from the end of World War I to the Sandinista Revolution in 1979. Focusing on the role of intellectuals, students explore debates on nationalism, immigration, culture, modernization, and development in the context of the consolidation of new Latin American states, the Alliance for Progress, the Chinese and Cuban Revolutions, and the student and guerrilla movements.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An exploration of Native American life before 1492, using books, documentaries, and films. Topics include the rise and fall of native cultures in the Americas, commerce, politics, economics, agriculture, and urbanization. The focus is on institutions, values, and interrelationships among people across the Americas, and the accomplishments and influences of individual civilizations on the history of the Americas.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Twentieth-century social, political, and cultural life in France and French (ex-) colonies in the Caribbean and Africa are examined through history, literature, and film. Topics include Paris as an intellectual center, France under German occupation, modernization and consumerism, family life and gender roles, decolonization, and multiculturalism and changing definitions of what it means to be French.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the origins, course, and legacy of World War II in Europe, Asia, and the Pacific. Topics include the expansion of German and Japanese power; war economies; occupation, resistance, and collaboration; genocide and atomic warfare; the shaping of a postwar order; and the construction and significance of personal and collective memories of wartime. Sources include film and fiction as well as historical readings.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the political culture of Germany after World War I. Topics include culture and ideology during the Weimar Republic, the lives of Hitler and other leading Nazis, racial policies, the structure of the Nazi regime, and the creation of a “New Order” in Europe. The course explores changing historical interpretations of the Third Reich and recent scholarly controversies, including debate about the relationship between memory and history.

Credits: 4

Department: History

This course will explore German politics, society, and culture from the 18th century to the present. Through history and literature, the course examines themes like the creation of a unified state, the two world wars unleashed from German soil, the rise and fall of Nazism, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, the division into two states during the Cold War, and the role of reunified Germany in today’s Europe.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the political and cultural history of modern Italy, charting Italy’s emergence as a modern nation and its subsequent reinvention as a fascist society. The rise and fall of Christian democracy, the building of the European Union and the impact of Americanization feature in the second half of the course. Another prominent theme is Italian migrations across Europe and the Americas.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines some of the political, social, and economic transformations in the United States between 1877 and 1945. Topics include immigration, the expanding international role of the U.S., reform movements, urbanization, and technological change. Analysis of a range of primary sources, from paintings to film, is emphasized.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The meaning of freedom and citizenship is a central theme in this examination of the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that have shaped the lives of African Americans since the end of the Civil War. Topics include Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights and black power movements.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The social, political, economic, and cultural development of Ireland from 1610 to the present is examined. Topics include the effects of conquest and land confiscation, survival techniques, the creation of Anglo-Irish society, the rise of nationalism, the legacy of the Great Famine, the Celtic cultural revival, the cost of Irish independence, and the emergence of the “Celtic Tiger.”

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines transformations of Chinese society and culture since the early 19th century. Themes include the impact of the West; the rise of Chinese nationalism; modernization, reforms, and revolution; and rapid economic growth in the 1990s.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The Civil War was arguably the most controversial and traumatic event in American history. This course considers how and why the war developed, its long-term results, and why it is such an important part of America’s cultural heritage. Through an examination of novels, films, diaries, and letters written by Civil War participants, students analyze the impact of this war and our continuing fascination with it.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The influence of warfare is arguably the least understood aspect of human history; too often, war is considered like a sporting event—teams, winners, and losers. Students critically examine the effects of warfare on U.S. history in the 20th century. Topics include how militarization and “modern” warfare influence American society and shape its history.

Credits: 4

Department: History

While many African-descended peoples throughout the world identify with a particular nationality—being Brazilian or Cuban, for example—many have also forged connections with each other across national boundaries and have recognized commonalities that transcend national contexts. To comprehend their shared experiences, students explore the history of the linkages created by Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-North Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries, using fiction, memoir, and recent historical scholarship.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines crucial factors that shaped the U.S. from the ratification of the Constitution to the Compromise of 1850, a period that witnessed the spread of democracy, the development of capitalism, and the expansion and consolidation of slavery in the South. Special emphasis is placed on race and class, technological developments, and the period’s influential movements and personalities.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the development of popular culture and the major cultural industries in the U.S. from the early 19th century to the present. Students are also introduced to theoretical approaches to popular culture and learn how to apply these tools to selected texts from various periods and media.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Introduces the largest unit of political organization, the empire, and its early appearances in various regions of the world. The focus is on Akkadia in Mesopotamia, Egypt’s New Kingdom, the Qin Dynasty in China, and the Inca Empire in South America (also known as the Inka Empire). The course reviews theories of sociopolitical organization and development drawn from anthropological archaeology, economics, ecology, and political science.

Credits: 4

Department: History

This study of African history addresses the continent’s geography and how it has affected Africa’s place in history, the rise and fall of civilizations, Islamic/Arab influences, European colonization, independence movements, and current challenges. In particular, students examine the slave trade and its effects on African societies, colonial domination, and the rise of nationalist movements.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines conflicts and controversies over the issue of American identity from the early 19th century to the present, emphasizing the links between Americanism and “whiteness.” Students explore how immigrants and people of color contested their exclusion from the symbolic national community, and how these groups have been incorporated into a larger national community during the last century.

Credits: 4

Department: History

The history of the American West is surveyed from its beginnings to the present. The focus is interdisciplinary: art, the popular novel, film, and historical documents are examined as a way of understanding the role of the West in the American mind. Writing is an integral part of the course.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the responses of European intellectuals to the Russian Revolution, Great Depression, spread of fascism, two world wars, and genocide. Themes include: the ideological conflict between communism, fascism, and democracy; race and empire; attempts to rethink socialist and capitalist economics; and reappraisals of human nature and modern progress in the light of the savageries unleashed in these decades.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An examination of American society, culture, and politics from World War II to the present. Topics include the Cold War, Vietnam, and the rise of a global order dominated by America; economic development and its social and cultural consequences; movements of the 1960s and their legacy in American politics; and the triumph of conservatism and emergence of a “postliberal” era.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Examines the new historiography on gender and sexuality in Latin America. It is organized around the themes of changing gender roles and shifting constructions of masculinity, femininity, and honor, with particular attention to issues of sexuality, sexual preferences, constraints, and transgressions.

Credits: 4

Department: History

An examination of the interplay of class, race, gender, and status in the Atlantic world from 1500 to 1860. Students are introduced to the ideas, beliefs, and formal philosophies that defined who were “haves” and “have nots” and explore the ways in which these notions were questioned and eventually challenged.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Combines classroom learning with practical experience. Lectures, discussions, and reading in urban, regional, and local history alternate with library and on-site archival education. Students spend half the semester on campus and half the semester at the Westchester County Archives.

Credits: 4

Department: History

This reading-intensive seminar traces the history of feminist movements in the U.S. and Europe from the 18th century to the present and also examines postcolonial global feminisms. Students are expected to master the basic historical narrative of Western feminist movements and to wrestle with the questions of race, class, and region that postcolonial feminist movements have raised.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: HIS1000-1994 Or HIS2000-2994 Or HIS3000-3994 Or HIS4000-4994 Or GND1000-1994 Or GND2000-2994 Or GND3000-3994 Or GND4000-4994

Department: History

Explores the place of women in Western society, from ancient Greece to the 17th century. The roles covered range from the prescribed (wife and mother) to the actual (intellectual and worker). Lectures are supplemented by discussion of primary sources.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores the place of women in European society, from the Enlightenment through the 20th century. Topics include the emergence of a women’s movement, the effects of industrialization on women, and the impact of both democratic and totalitarian regimes on women. Lectures are supplemented by discussion of primary sources.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Explores traditional Chinese civilization, including the shaping of the strong imperial tradition; Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism; arts and literature; and China’s relations with other Asian countries before the modern age.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Develops students’ interviewing and interpretive skills in the field of oral history. Students learn the theory and methodology and work on a final research project that seeks to bring forward the voices of those frequently excluded from more typical historical sources. Students also learn to produce archival quality interviews, and the final project includes some form of public presentation.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Students read selections from the works of major historians and examine new techniques and methodologies. Designed to help juniors prepare proposals for their senior projects. Required for junior history majors and intended exclusively for them.

Credits: 4

Department: History

Meeting at the Academy of Drama in Prague, students study and perform plays by Václav Havel, the dissident playwright imprisoned during the Communist era who became president of the Czech Republic. Students explore political and cultural contexts of theatrical performance, enhanced by meetings with theatre professionals and visits to sites relevant to the intersection of artistic creation and political revolution.

Credits: 3

Department: History

Jewish Studies

Description:

Jewish Studies courses explore the Bible, the history and archaeology of ancient Israel, the ancient Middle East, Jewish history, Israel studies, Holocaust history, philosophy, literature and Hebrew language.

Course materials extend from antiquity to the contemporary. The approach is interdisciplinary and involves the faculties of History, Literature, and Language and Culture, in the School of Humanities. Students in any discipline may minor in Jewish studies, or students may major in History and choose Jewish history as their area of interest.

This program was originally made possible, in part, by a Challenge Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Minor requirements:

The minor in Jewish studies is designed to provide students with a general introduction to the history and culture of the Jewish people through a combination of courses in Jewish history, literature, and philosophy, and in the Hebrew language.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor after consultation with the faculty coordinator of the Jewish studies program.

For students interested in majoring in History with a concentration in Jewish history, please go to the History Board of Study

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Jewish Studies

Five courses, selected from Jewish history, Jewish literature in translation, or Hebrew language, in consultation with the faculty coordinator of the Jewish Studies program.


Faculty

  • Professor of History
    • BA, Bryn Mawr College
    • MA, PhD, University of Chicago

Courses

For beginning students and those with rudimentary training in Hebrew. The course stresses reading, writing, and speaking by involving students in situations that concretely express the concepts of the language.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

A continuation of HEB 1010. Students increase their fluency and confidence in comprehension through discussions of simple stories and increased grammar drill. Situations are presented and discussed in Hebrew.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: HEB1010

Department: Jewish Studies

Readings of adapted short stories and essays stimulate class discussion in Hebrew and provide the context for increased vocabulary and written drills. Attention is given to grammar and style.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: HEB1020

Department: Jewish Studies

A conversational Hebrew course that allows students to acquire fluency in spoken Hebrew. Reading, writing, grammar, syntax, and conversation in modern Hebrew are emphasized.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Explores the ancient civilizations of the Middle East, including those of Egypt, Israel, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and Iran. Students examine cultural, social, and political movements using texts as well as archaeology as sources.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Examines how early Jewish interactions with various cultures affected the development of Judaism. Interactions with Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Christian, and Muslim cultures are explored. Topics include conflicts with external powers, exile, and diaspora.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

How was the Holocaust possible in the 20th century? This course responds to the question by examining specific issues: German anti-Semitism; Hitler’s rise to power; the genocide process; responses to Nazism and the news of the Holocaust in Jewish and international communities; resistance and collaboration; and theological and moral questions.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Considers the profound influence Judaism, Christianity, and Islam have exerted on the social, cultural, and political history of the East and the West. This course examines the historical developments, tenets, and scriptures of the three religions.

Credits: 3

Department: Jewish Studies

Explores the history of American Jewry from its beginnings to the present, touching on such topics as integration into American society, formation of Jewish identity, anti-Semitism, evolving religious traditions, cultural clashes, cultural issues involving various waves of immigration, the evolving role of women, Jews and entertainment, and economic and political issues.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

An exploration of gender issues in the ancient world. Beginning with the ancient Near East and the biblical world in particular, students discuss portrayals of women, as well as their actual roles in society. Using textual and archaeological evidence, the course branches out to the related cultures of Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

An exploration of the peoples, religions, cultures, places, and monuments of the land of Israel. Home to three major world religions, the land has been embraced, fought over, and conquered repeatedly throughout history. Why? Students explore the reasons for Israel’s prominence and discover how its position and importance in the worldview is constantly being reinvented.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

The historicity of the Hebrew Bible is explored, from the protohistory of the Israelites as related through the Pentateuch and early prophetic works, through the period of the Monarchies, to the 6th-century B.C. exile, the birth of early Judaism, and the books of prophets and writings. Issues relating to historiography and biblical criticism are essential elements in this course.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

The historical relationship of Judaism and Christianity and the encounter of the Jewish and Christian communities from ancient to contemporary times are examined. Topics include the split between the two religions in late antiquity, medieval disputations, and the challenges of the modern period. Students also examine the varying ways in which texts can be interpreted.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Explores the relationship between politics and archaeology. Topics include who owns antiquities; fakes, forgeries, and the manipulating of history; presentations of archaeology to the public; buying, selling, and auctioning of antiquities; and archaeology in wartime. The geographic range of topics includes Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Syria, and other countries in region, as well as Greece and Rome.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Critics agree that the world of the concentration camps and ghettoes is impossible to duplicate on stage. Despite serious aesthetic and practical constraints, playwrights in Europe, Israel, and America have, for the last five decades, created a diverse group of plays dealing with this unprecedented 20th-century event. Works examined in class include documentary dramas, realistic reenactments, absurdist plays, a comedy, and a standup routine.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Beginning as a response to the immigrant experience, writing by American Jews emerged as a central literary presence and the inspiration for important films. This course traces the evolution from early writers such as Abraham Cahan and Anzia Yezierska, through major figures such as Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, and I.B. Singer, to their contemporaries and heirs, including Stanley Elkin, Joseph Heller, Cynthia Ozick, and Grace Paley.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Explores a variety of literary and cinematic works that depict the conflicting points of view and the varied interests of contemporary Israeli and Arab writers and filmmakers. Students learn the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict and then explore a variety of issues relating to it by reading the work of Amos Oz, David Grossman, Mahmood Darwish, and others. Films include Paradise Now (Hany Abu-Assad, 2005) and Lemon Tree (Eran Riklis, 2008).

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Focuses on a variety of writings (memoirs, letters, fiction, poetry), theatre, and films depicting the Yiddish world of the Lower East Side, home to more than two million Eastern European Jewish immigrants between 1880 and 1920. Readings include selections from the work of a variety of authors, from Yiddish newspapers, films, and other cultural materials.

Credits: 4

Department: Jewish Studies

Examines philosophers’ efforts to rethink fundamental ethical, legal, and political issues in the wake of total war and totalitarian domination in Europe between 1914 and 1945. Focusing on Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem, questions about resistance, complicity, guilt, and punishment become central. Additional texts are selected from Jaspers, Beauvoir, Sartre, Foucault, Derrida, Levinas, Adorno, and Butler.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: PHI1515 Or PHI2110 Or PHI3212

Department: Jewish Studies

Journalism

Description:

The journalism major at Purchase College is designed to provide students with the intellectual bases and skills to gather, assess, and disseminate information and ideas.

This equips students for careers in journalism and a wide variety of other fields, including law, government, business, and public relations. The program fits naturally in the School of Humanities, as journalism at its best exemplifies the open and honest inquiry that marks the liberal arts and sciences.

Students are offered a central set of skills courses in journalism, electives in specialized areas in a variety of media, and courses that explore the broader context of journalistic practice. Students also take advantage of the broad offerings of Purchase College, and are encouraged to have internships. The studies culminate in a senior project, an extended work that allows students to showcase the full range of their talents.

Facilities

Purchase students produce journalism in a variety of computer labs using equipment consistent with industry standards. Journalism majors work in a dedicated suite in the Humanities Building that offers an integrated newsroom, broadcast studio, and control room with up-to-the-minute technology.

Our proximity to New York City, the media capital of the world, has enabled students to land internships with such varied media outlets as NBC, CBS, ABC, PBS, MSG, Marie Claire, and the Daily News. In essence, we strive to offer our students whatever they need to produce and promote excellent work. Chief among these things is a core set of journalistic practices and principles that remain steady even as the technology changes.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all journalism majors must complete the following:

I. Introductory Courses: 6 credits

These two introductory courses are the only journalism courses open to freshmen.

  1. JOU 1500/Introduction to Media: 3 credits
  2. JOU 2150/History of Journalism: 3 credits

II. Central Courses: 22 credits

  1. JOU 2515/Journalism I: 4 credits*
  2. JOU 2915/Journalism II: 4 credits*
  3. JOU 3080/Freedom and the Media: 4 credits
  4. JOU 3880/Junior Seminar in Journalism: 2 credits
  5. SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  6. SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

*Students must earn a minimum grade of C+ in JOU 2515 and 2915, which must be taken initially and in sequence.

III. Journalism Electives: 10–12 credits

Three journalism electives, chosen from the list below. For students who begin the major from fall 2020 onward, at least one of the three electives must be a practical course in visual journalism (denoted by an asterisk).

Please note: New courses may be added to this list. Students should check with their faculty advisor to determine if a new course is an appropriate elective.

COM 3375/Podcasting and Audio Storytelling
JOU 1120/Journalism and Film
JOU 3040/Race, Gender, and the Media
JOU 3100/Photojournalism*
JOU 3120/First-Person Reporting
JOU 3130/News Documentary (added Spring 2017)
JOU 3160/Broadcast News I*
JOU 3170/Broadcast News II
JOU 3200/Feature Writing
JOU 3220/The Art of Sportswriting
JOU 3230/The Beat of Music Journalism
JOU 3350/Community Reporting
JOU 3374/The Literature of Journalism
JOU 3500/Multimedia Tools*
JOU 3600/News Editing
JOU 3780/Criticism/Reviewing Workshop
JOU 4010/Covering the Arts
JOU 4020/International Issues Reporting
JOU 4150/Investigative Reporting
JOU 4320/Broadcast Writing
LIT 3635/Reviewing the Contemporary Novel
PHI 3085/Objectivity

IV. Other Studies

Five electives in one area of study within the liberal arts and sciences, chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor. (Many students will find it appropriate to earn a minor.) The per-course credits vary, but the credit total is typically 18 to 20. A minimum of 9 credits must be upper-level.


Updates to the 2019-20 College Catalog

  • Added the practical course in visual journalism elective requirement for students who begin the major from fall 2020 onward.

Minor requirements:

The minor in journalism is designed for undergraduate students in all disciplines at Purchase College who are interested in the field of journalism.

Students interested in this minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Journalism

Five courses (18–20 credits) are required:

JOU 2515/Journalism I*
JOU 2915/Journalism II*
JOU 3080/Freedom and the Media
JOU —/Two journalism electives

*Students must earn a minimum grade of C+ in JOU 2515 and 2915, which must be taken initially and in sequence.


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    • BA, Brown University
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, New York University
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Lecturer in Journalism
    • BA, University of Minnesota.
    • Critic fellow and faculty member at the National Critics Institute at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center.
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, University of Washington
    • MFA, Hunter College
  • Lecturer in Journalism
    • Graduate of the Naval School of Photography, Defense Information School of Photojournalism, and the U.S. Navy-sponsored military photojournalism program, Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University.
  • Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, MA, Empire State College, SUNY
  • Lecturer in Journalism
    • BS Central Michigan University
    • MA New York University

  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    Interim Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    • BA, University of Minnesota
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Lecturer in Journalism
    • BA Tufts University
    • MS Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Journalism
    • BA, The Elliot School of International Affairs,George Washington University
    • MS, Columbia University
    • MA, Fairfield University

  • Associate Professor of Journalism
    • BA, American University
    • MS, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Courses

Students will learn different styles of podcasting, best practices for developing and pitching a show, how to use professional audio recorders, basic audio editing techniques with Adobe Audition and how to build an audience and distribute a podcast once it’s complete.

Credits: 3

Department: Journalism

An exploration of journalism through famous films. Students screen a variety of films that investigate different aspects of journalistic practice—from classic shoe-leather reporting to high-stakes investigations aimed at uncovering political malfeasance and corruption. The course also covers everyday challenges of the craft, from developing sources to navigating ethical dilemmas and the ever-increasing demand to meet deadlines and make headlines.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Today’s media are placed in historical, cultural, and economic context. Students explore the concept of media literacy, and then delve into specific media platforms, including newspapers, magazines, the Internet, radio, TV, and movies. The class also examines the spin-off industries of advertising and public relations.

Credits: 3

Department: Journalism

Covers the history of journalism with an emphasis on American journalism after 1900. Students examine the objectives of journalism, styles of writing and coverage, and the shape and impact of the industry in various periods. Recent developments are studied with an eye toward how they fit into historical contexts.

Credits: 3

Department: Journalism

In this introductory course, students learn the fundamentals of reporting and writing news stories, focusing on the skills that form the basis for newspaper, magazines, broadcast, and Web-based journalism. Students also learn AP (Associated Press) style and proofreading and examine broader issues, such as ethics, the impact of the media, and libel.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Students build on skills developed in JOU 2515 and delve into more specific areas of coverage called “beats.” Students who complete JOU 2515 and 2915 may be eligible for semester-long internships at local publications.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2515

Department: Journalism

Students explore the region to produce journalistic reports that include writing and photography. Assignments include stories on challenges facing a French family, implications of a French political issue, a social issue, and a travel piece. The goal is for students to write as a foreign correspondent, conveying the community’s views, struggles, sights, and sensations to an audience back home. (offered in France, Summer)

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Students are introduced to documentary techniques as they explore the region through their digital cameras. Topics include environmental portraiture, landscape, and feature photography, among others. France’s rich contributions to documentary photography and the “decisive moment” are discussed. Students shoot and produce a photo story on the community, culture, and environment of the region. Open to beginning and advanced photography students. (offered in France, Summer)

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Examines the relationship between the media and social constructions of race, gender, and class, both in the U.S. and within a global context. Topics include biases and assumptions in print and visual media; representations of masculinity and femininity; and the media’s role in creating and reinforcing ideas, symbols, and ideologies within cultures. Text analysis includes newspapers, magazine articles, cartoons, television, movies, and advertising.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Examines the historical, philosophical, and legal bases for freedom of speech and of the press in the U.S. and the practical application of these principles to print, broadcast, and online media today. Topics include the First Amendment, libel, privacy, government regulation, news gathering, and journalism ethics. Not recommended for freshmen or sophomores.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Students build on skills acquired in previous journalism classes as they explore in depth the various interviewing techniques for print, broadcast, and online media. Students critique each other’s work and critically dissect published articles and broadcast interviews. They report and write their own in-depth profiles with an eye toward publication in professional or student publications or broadcast outlets.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

A basic course in the use of photography for journalistic purposes. Topics include how to shoot news events, feature photo shoots, cropping, and the use of computer technology.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Students build on the skills acquired in JOU 2515 and 2915 as they discuss, critique, write, revise, and edit first-person reporting. This is a writing-intensive course; students work on developing a point of view and voice and craft material that resonates with the reader. They are also expected to be active peer-editors of their classmates’ work.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Documentaries are supposed to provide a factual record, but do they? In this course, students analyze, critique, and deconstruct documentary films, and discuss the evolution of the genre. Historical context, aesthetics, and ethics are examined. Students look at the emerging fault lines in the documentary format, where it has become increasingly difficult to tell the difference between news and entertainment.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Students learn about business and economic news through reporting, writing, and reading, and establish an understanding of the four core elements of business journalism: the economy; the financial world; the consumer; and government regulation/policy. Students familiarize themselves with the language of corporations and the financial markets, and learn how to write clearly for any audience.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Building on the foundations of JOU 2515 and 2915, this hands-on course enables students to make the transition from reporting for print and online publications to reporting for radio and television news broadcasts. Students gain experience shooting, writing, and editing television news stories and are introduced to the basics of live television studio production. Recommended prior course: JOU 3500.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Students further their development as broadcast journalists through class exercises, field assignments, and in-studio productions, serving as reporters, anchors, producers, and directors for a campus television news and feature program. Strengthening broadcast writing skills and polishing on-air delivery are emphasized.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU3160 Or JOU3150

Department: Journalism

An advanced course focusing on longer and more complex reporting and writing techniques for newspapers, magazines, and other types of publications.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2515 And JOU2915

Department: Journalism

In this overview of national sports journalism, the craft is explored through extensive reading of eminent sports writers and the history of the art, as well as intensive writing. Special emphasis is placed on thorough reporting, the craft of interviewing, writing on deadline, and producing prose written in a distinctive voice.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Explores the craft of journalistic writing about various musical genres, including rock, hip-hop, punk, heavy metal, classical, R&B, and jazz. Readings include notable works of music journalism in print and on the web. Students write articles on the genres of particular interest to them. This course is suitable for both specialized (journalism and music) and general audiences.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Students report on communities surrounding the college, with an emphasis on Port Chester, in collaboration with Casa Purchase. Includes résumé-building opportunities to get work published in local news outlets on such topics as immigration, social justice, public safety, sports, housing, education, politics, business, volunteerism, lifestyles, and college issues.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Students look at the evolution of long-form journalism of postwar America, roughly defined as 1946–1980. Works include Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, John Hersey’s Hiroshima, and the magazine writing of Lillian Ross, Alex Haley, Joan Didion, and Gay Talese. The class also explores more recent authors, such as Isabel Wilkerson and Rachel Aviv, and the influences of the digital age.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

An introduction to issues and developments in multimedia journalism. Students critique and create stories for publication online, learning how to assemble story packages that combine media elements, including text, video, audio, and images. Includes some exploration of the use of social media and other techniques to promote stories. May be taken concurrently with JOU 2515 or 2915. Completion of JOU 3500 is strongly recommended before taking JOU 3160.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2515

Department: Journalism

Covers the art of editing, from breaking news to features in special styles. Students work intensively on improving writing, expanding knowledge of word crafting, and producing tight prose. The relationship between reporters, editors, and decisions about news judgment is examined. An essential course for writing-based careers.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2515

Department: Journalism

An introduction to styles of criticism and a practical course in writing short, critical essays (reviews) on the performing and visual arts. On-campus plays and films are assigned; students write about theatre, film, music, dance, painting, and other art forms.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2515

Department: Journalism

The goal of this seminar is to equip students with the skills needed to complete a successful senior project, and guide them in choosing a topic and format to research and report in depth. Students look at career options in journalism, do a résumé and job-hunting workshop, and discuss internships. Required for journalism majors.

Credits: 2

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Using the college’s wide array of cultural activities as material, students learn to bring immediacy and depth to their reporting on entertainment and the arts. The course begins with a study of the form and function of various disciplines as a basis for this reporting.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2515 And JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Examines the methods of international affairs journalism, how international issues and organizations are covered, and the innovative ways in which local reporters can reach out to bring the world closer to their readers. Students produce stories that illuminate connections between nearby neighborhoods and faraway lands. Limited to students who have declared a major or minor in journalism.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

Building on skills from Multimedia Tools, students approach video in a photojournalistic style. They learn to identify interesting characters with remarkable stories. In nonnarrative video storytelling—where students capture vérité scenes and create cinematic sequences—the focus is on having people tell their stories in their own words. This personal approach allows the viewer to relate and to emotionally engage.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU3500 Or JOU3160

Department: Journalism

Student reporters learn to develop the investigative state of mind needed to change public opinion and influence policy making. Working individually and in teams, students use documents, databases, official records, and human sources to probe social justice issues, expose official hypocrisy, and ferret out corruption, waste, and inefficiency in government and other institutions.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: JOU2915

Department: Journalism

An introduction to the contemporary novel and the art and practice of book reviewing. Students read exemplary novels (e.g., Cloud Atlas and Netherland); they read exemplary book critics (e.g., Zadie Smith and James Wood); and they write their own exemplary reviews of contemporary fiction. Writing assignments range from blog posts to newspaper-style reviews and magazine-style essays.

Credits: 4

Department: Journalism

Though often seen as simply a test of students’ knowledge and ideas, essays go far beyond what is generally required in courses. Students in this course read and experiment with a wide variety of critical, journalistic, academic, personal, and experimental essay forms. In the process, they further develop their skills as critical thinkers and writers.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: WRI1110 Or WRI2110

Department: Journalism

Language and Culture

Description:

Knowledge of foreign languages and an awareness of other cultures are of critical importance in today’s world, in which international communication is instantaneous and events taking place at great geographical distances have immediate global repercussions.

The language and culture program offers students the opportunity to acquire fluency in at least one language and to gain familiarity with the society (or societies) in which that language is used. Keeping in step with the increasingly complex interactions among countries, the program also allows students to explore a diversity of cultures through the wide choice of courses that fulfill requirements for the major.

The language and culture major offers a full program in French and Spanish, with opportunities to study Chinese, German, Hebrew, Italian, linguistics, and Portuguese. A course in Nigerian/Hausa language and culture is also available through the anthropology program.

Modern languages are taught through an approach that immediately involves students in oral interactions in the target language, while developing their linguistic and cultural awareness. Beginning French and Spanish courses also include interactive language labs. As students acquire fluency, they are introduced to varied aspects of the language’s cultural context. These include courses in civilization, translation, literature, and history.

Foreign Language Placement

All students are required to complete a foreign language placement exam before enrolling in any language course. Faculty members monitor their class lists to ensure that students have taken the exam and are enrolled in the appropriate level.

Study Abroad Opportunities

Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the college’s study abroad programs. These interdisciplinary programs include courses that fulfill requirements for the major in language and culture and/or core curriculum requirements.

Minors in the Language and Culture Program

Students majoring in any discipline may pursue a minor offered by the language and culture program: Chinese, French, Italian, Spanish, and linguistics. Students interested in pursuing any of these minors should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office.

Related Interdisciplinary Minors:

Asian Studies | Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX Studies

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all students majoring in language and culture must:

  1. demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language by completing, with a grade of B or higher, a 3000 or 4000 level course conducted in the major language.
  2. complete the Translation Workshop in the selected language with a grade of B or higher. For those concentrating in French, LAC 3430/An Introduction to Linguistics can be substituted for this requirement in semesters the Translation Workshop is not being offered.
  3. complete a minimum of eight courses related to the study of foreign culture; courses in the two previous categories are included. Four of these eight courses must be related to the specific cultural area of the major language. The eight courses may include relevant courses offered by other departments such as Literature, History, Political Science, Art History, Anthropology, etc with the approval of their major advisor.

    Students may replace three of the eight courses described above with courses in a second language. To exercise this option, students must complete at least two semesters of the second language at the advanced level or above. Beginning languages may not be counted toward the completion of this option.

  4. complete a two-semester, 8-credit senior project: SPJ 4990/Senior Project I (4 credits), followed by SPJ 4991/Senior Project II (4 credits). The project must have as its focus some manifestation of the major language or culture that the student has selected. It may take a variety of forms, concentrating on aspects of the major language, on a cultural theme, or on a particular period or event. It will generally involve research, though it may incorporate the student’s personal experience (e.g., work or study abroad). All majors must submit a short proposal of their senior topic for approval by the Language and Culture Board of Study by Oct. 15 (or March 15) of their senior year.

Faculty

  • Lecturer in Spanish
    • MA, Auburn University
  • Lecturer in Hebrew
    • BA, Hunter College, City University of New York
    • MA, Long Island University
  • Assistant Professor of Language and Culture
    Coordinator of Language Programs and Linguistics Minor
    • BA, MA, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
    • MA, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
    • MA, PhD, University of Southern California
  • Lecturer in German
    • BA, Humberside Business School (UK)
    • BA, Fachhochschule Münster (Germany)
    • MA, Manhattanville College
  • Lecturer in Spanish
    • BA, University at Buffalo, SUNY
    • MA, Manhattanville College
  • Lecturer in Spanish
    • BA, Hamilton College
    • MA, Columbia University
  • Lecturer in French
    • Licence-ès-Lettres, Maitrise-ès-Lettres, University of Antananarivo (Madagascar)
    • MA, University of Cincinnati
    • PhD, University of Oregon
  • Assistant Professor of French and Literature
    • BA, Trent University (Canada)
    • MA, Queen’s University (Canada)
    • MA, PhD, Yale University
  • Lecturer in Chinese
    • BA, Peoples University of Beijing (China)
  • Lecturer in Language and Culture
    • BA, Universidad de Lima
    • MA, California State University Los Angeles
  • Lecturer in Italian
    • BA, University of Pisa (Italy)
    • PhD, University of Alberta (Canada)
  • Lecturer in French
    • BA, University of Nantes, France
    • MA, La Sorbonne University, Paris, France

  • Associate Professor of Spanish and Literature
    • BA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Lecturer in Portuguese
    • AA, Monterey Peninsula College
    • BA, University of California, Santa Cruz
    • MA, New York University
  • Lecturer in Spanish
    • BS, University of La Sabana (Colombia)
    • MA, Manhattanville College
  • Lecturer in Spanish
    • MA, New School
    • PhD, CUNY Graduate Center
  • Lecturer in Spanish
    • BA, University of Leeds, England

Courses

A comprehensive introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), beginning with a focus on the linguistic aspects of ASL, including syntax, facial expression, vocabulary, and the manual alphabet. Students progress to conversational signing and finger spelling and develop an ability to communicate on a beginning level.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

In this continuation of American Sign Language I, emphasis is placed on conversational signing, syntax, and facial expression. Students are introduced to classifiers and directional verbs, and develop an ability to communicate on an intermediate level.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ASL1000

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Introduces the basics of pronunciation and of the structural and writing systems of standard modern Chinese (Mandarin Chinese).

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of CHI 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. Development of oral skills remains the primary object of the course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CHI1010

Department: Language and Culture

Introduces various aspects of Chinese culture (e.g., values, customs, manners, and festivals) and discusses everyday life in contemporary Chinese society.

Credits: 3

Department: Language and Culture

Designed for students who have completed CHI 1010 and 1020 or the equivalent. Consolidates the foundation that students have acquired through previous coursework and introduces more complex grammatical structures and background cultural information.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CHI1020

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of CHI 2010. Consolidates the foundation that students have acquired through previous coursework and introduces more complex grammatical structures and background cultural information.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CHI2010

Department: Language and Culture

Designed for students who have completed CHI 2010 and 2020 or studied the language for at least two years. Consolidates the knowledge and skills acquired through previous coursework and enhances reading, writing, and oral-expressive skills.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CHI2020

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of CHI 3010, designed for students who have completed five semesters of college-level Chinese or the equivalent. Consolidates the knowledge and skills acquired through previous coursework and enhances reading, writing, and oral proficiency.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: CHI3010

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written French by involving the student in situations that concretely represent the concepts of the language.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of FRE 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. The development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students who are already familiar with the fundamentals of spoken and written French. Through a variety of written and oral assignments and exercises, students acquire a wider range of vocabulary, review basic structures, and become more comfortable interacting in spoken French. Students are encouraged to take risks and enjoy the adventure of language acquisition in an open and relaxed atmosphere.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of FRE 2010. Concentrated work to help students acquire more nuanced vocabulary, with an introduction to slang. Students gain greater ease in reading through a variety of texts of increasing difficulty. The readings also serve as a basis for discussion, composition, and grammar review.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students who are already familiar with the fundamentals of French; placement in FRE 2070 or 3070 is determined by a brief exam. Designed to help students quickly acquire the ability to negotiate their immediate surroundings using the French language. Elements of grammar and syntax are introduced, reviewed, and complemented by readings from newspapers and other sources relevant to everyday life. Taught in French, with emphasis on the spoken language. (Offered in France, Summer)

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Offers a stress-free learning atmosphere to help students of French move toward fluency. Starting with a brief refresher on the basics through interactive situations in the classroom, students go on to invent situations, then perform, write about, and discuss them, increasing their command of the language and their comfort level in using it.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

In this continuation of FRE 3015, readings, writing, and conversational exercises are used to improve fluency in the French language. A variety of media are used to stimulate discussions. To increase their comfort level and command of French, students invent dramatic situations in the classroom that they perform, analyze, discuss, and debate.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A study of major developments in French Caribbean literature of the 19th through 21st centuries. This course focuses on questions of language, race, gender, geography, and class, with emphasis on local, regional, and global frames of reference.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students who are already familiar with the fundamentals of French; placement in FRE 2070 or 3070 is determined by a brief exam. Uses material like television, magazines, newspapers, and literature to help students increase their knowledge of the language while introducing the various aspects of French life. Students also review and refine their knowledge of grammatical structures and work toward becoming familiar with idiomatic language and slang. Taught in French, with emphasis on the spoken language. (Offered in France, Summer)

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Islands, because of their size and supposed isolation, have been the site of environmental and military experiments. Similarly, writers have used the island to build a textual laboratory in order to test their philosophical and narrative experiments. In this course, students will look at novels (including graphic novels) to examine this scientific, military and narrative instrumentalization of the island.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

An examination of the short fiction form, including novellas and stories, from tales of adventure to modern psychological fiction. The course begins with the realists, then moves through the surrealists, existentialists, and “nouveau roman” authors. Texts include works by Balzac, Nerval, Flaubert, Desnos, Camus, Sarraute, Colette, and Duras.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: FRE3015

Department: Language and Culture

How does the cinema adapt a text, and what are the questions underlying these semiological, ideological, or technical choices? Students read the literature (i.e., Cyrano de Bergerac, Madame Bovary) and view the films. Although this course is taught in English, the films are in French, and students who can read the literature in French are encouraged to do so.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Students are introduced to the theory of translation, as it has developed over time and has dealt with questions from linguists, poets, anthropologists, and gender theorists. Taken in conjunction with FRE 3735.

Credits: 2

COREQ: FRE3735

Department: Language and Culture

Students produce, refine, evaluate, and reflect on translations from French to English and English to French. Particular emphasis on the translation of fiction and poetry. Taken in conjunction with FRE 3730.

Credits: 2

COREQ: FRE3730

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language, and for students who are majoring in language and culture. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written German by involving the student in interactive situations.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of GER 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. Development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: GER1010

Department: Language and Culture

For beginning students and those with rudimentary training in Hebrew. The course stresses reading, writing, and speaking by involving students in situations that concretely express the concepts of the language.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of HEB 1010. Students increase their fluency and confidence in comprehension through discussions of simple stories and increased grammar drill. Situations are presented and discussed in Hebrew.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: HEB1010

Department: Language and Culture

Readings of adapted short stories and essays stimulate class discussion in Hebrew and provide the context for increased vocabulary and written drills. Attention is given to grammar and style.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: HEB1020

Department: Language and Culture

A conversational Hebrew course that allows students to acquire fluency in spoken Hebrew. Reading, writing, grammar, syntax, and conversation in modern Hebrew are emphasized.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Explores major social, cultural, economic, and political developments in Latin America from the period following the Wars of Independence to the present. The historical roots of such problems as racism, persistent poverty, and political repression are examined, focusing on “subaltern” groups (e.g., peasants, workers, women, and people of color).

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Explores the political and cultural history of modern Italy, charting Italy’s emergence as a modern nation and its subsequent reinvention as a fascist society. The rise and fall of Christian democracy, the building of the European Union and the impact of Americanization feature in the second half of the course. Another prominent theme is Italian migrations across Europe and the Americas.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

While many African-descended peoples throughout the world identify with a particular nationality—being Brazilian or Cuban, for example—many have also forged connections with each other across national boundaries and have recognized commonalities that transcend national contexts. To comprehend their shared experiences, students explore the history of the linkages created by Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-North Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries, using fiction, memoir, and recent historical scholarship.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written Italian by involving the student in situations that concretely represent the concepts of the language.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of ITA 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. The development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ITA1010

Department: Language and Culture

For students already familiar with the fundamentals of spoken and written Italian. After a review of grammar through various reading assignments, students are given a context for discussion to increase vocabulary and speaking ease. Weekly compositions aid grammar review.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ITA1020

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of ITA 2010. Weekly compositions serve as an aid for grammar review.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ITA2010

Department: Language and Culture

For students already familiar with the fundamentals of spoken and written Italian. Particular attention is given to conversation, encouraging the student to communicate in Italian. Various authentic materials (newspapers, videos, audio cassettes) are used to facilitate this process. (Offered in Italy, Summer)

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had at least four semesters of college Italian or the equivalent. Through selected readings on a variety of topics, students explore the more complex aspects of the Italian language. Discussions and written work based on the readings help students attain a higher level of fluency. (Offered in Italy, Summer)

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

An introduction to the study of syntax and its relationship to interpretation and meaning (semantics). Data from English and other languages are used to illustrate the basic principles and parameters that govern language facility. The course progresses from an introduction of the basic notions of syntactic theory to more complex phenomena observed in the world’s languages.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

The literatures of former French colonies are deeply concerned with questions of space: territory, displacement, indigeneity and migration. This course analyzes recurrent spatial tropes (the island, the plantation, the border, etc.) in the French-language literatures of the Caribbean, the Indian Ocean and Africa to see how received notions of space, including literature as textual space, are reinvented.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

We will look at French-language texts from the Caribbean, Indian Ocean and Africa. Emphasis will be on transnational conflicts and solidarities. Texts will be read and taught in English, but French majors and minors are encouraged to read the texts in the original French.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A survey of various teaching methods in second language instruction. Students become familiar with the theories of language learning that underlie these methodologies. Open to all students interested in second language teaching methods.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

An introduction to the study of linguistics, with a focus on Spanish. Students examine the theoretical aspects of numerous subfields of linguistics—phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax—and begin to apply this knowledge to the fields of dialectology and sociolinguistics. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

An introduction to basic linguistic concepts, providing a background for understanding how language works and is used in everyday life. Topics include core areas of linguistics (e.g., phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics) and more applied areas of language study (e.g., sociolinguistics and second language acquisition).

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Designed to develop students’ skills for the formulation, proposal, research, and execution of individual research projects

Credits: 2

Department: Language and Culture

Centers on a close reading of Don Quixote, with attention to other works of Cervantes and to his importance to European narrative as a whole.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written Portuguese by involving the student in situations that concretely represent the concepts of the language.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of POR1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. Development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: POR1010

Department: Language and Culture

Introduction to the sociology of memory, focusing on the United States and Latin America. Topics include memory and the nation, memory and race, memory, gender, and sexuality, the politics of memory, memory tourism, memorials, museums, and memory in art and popular culture.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SOC1500 Or PSY1530 Or ANT1500 Or HIS1200 Or HIS1600

Department: Language and Culture

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written Spanish by involving the student in situations that concretely represent the concepts of the language.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

A continuation of SPA 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. Development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For students already familiar with the fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish. Through various reading assignments, students are given a context for discussion to increase vocabulary and speaking ease. Weekly compositions serve as an aid for grammar review.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Concentrated work to help students acquire more specialized vocabulary, with an introduction to slang. Students gain greater ease in reading through a variety of texts of increasing difficulty. These texts also serve as a basis for discussion, composition, and grammar review.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

For native speakers of Spanish who have had little or no formal training in the language. The focus is on expanding each student’s ability to read and write fluently, in preparation for the challenges of upper-level Spanish courses.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Summer (offered in Spain)For students who need to review and extend the fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish. Particular attention is given to developing fluency in conversation, increasing understanding, encouraging students to communicate in Spanish, writing clear Spanish, and reading original materials like advertisements and magazines. Various authentic materials (audio cassettes, newspapers) are used to facilitate this process.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Introduces students to the more complex aspects of the language, while promoting oral and written fluency through a variety of materials. Excerpts from novels, plays, poetry, periodicals, and films are used to promote classroom discussions with active student participation. Frequent oral presentations and weekly compositions required.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Summer (offered in Spain)For students who have had at least four semesters of college Spanish or the equivalent. Through selected readings on a variety of topics, students explore the more complex aspects of the Spanish language. Discussions and written work based on the readings help students attain a high level of fluency.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Spain and Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Films are discussed and analyzed in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

In this creative writing course, students write in Spanish in a variety of genres (dramatic dialogues, short fiction, and poetry). Style, dialogue, characterization, structure, and mood are explored through writing exercises and the analysis of different Latin American writers. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Conducted entirely in Spanish, this course focuses on reading, researching, and analyzing a variety of texts and consists primarily of literary, philosophical, and social discussions in the target language. It is designed to facilitate, improve, and develop reading and analytical skills as well as students’ confidence in their ability to speak Spanish in public. In addition to the extensive class discussions, students read two novel-length books and write two short essays in Spanish. Taught in Spanish

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

The history of Hispanic poetry is examined through readings of its major poets from the Middle Ages through the modern period. Taught in Spanish

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Students study essays, films, and short fiction in Spanish to advance their knowledge of Hispanic cultures and to develop advanced skills in conversation, reading, and composition.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Students explore the various languages and cultures that exist in Spanish-speaking countries. In general terms, the course is structured in two blocks: (1) Iberian Peninsula, pre- and post-Indo-European invasion; and (2) Latin America, pre- and post-Spanish invasion.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

An introduction to the structural analysis of Spanish, focusing on grammar, morphology, and syntax. Students examine the set of structural rules governing the composition of words (derivational and inflectional morphology) and phrases (constituents, word order, sentence structure).

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

An introduction to the thought, art, and history of Spain from the Middle Ages to the Baroque through close readings of major literary texts. Readings include the medieval epic (Poem of the Cid), the traditional ballad (Romancero), the early novel (La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes), Cervantes, and the classic theatre. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Major literary and social movements of 19th- and 20th-century Spain: Romanticism, the realist novel, the generations of 1898 and 1927, and the Civil War are central. Authors include Bécquer, Galdos, Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, and Lorca. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Major novels of 20th-century Latin America and their literary and social contexts. Authors include Guiraldes, Carpentier, Cortàzar, and García Márquez. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SPA3015

Department: Language and Culture

Who had the idea to name part of the world “Latin America”? What makes it “Latin”? Who has an interest in this definition? Who is included and who isn’t? This course asks these questions and others through readings of texts by Bolívar, Martí, Mariátegui, and others.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Selected examples drawn from the significant number of Latin American writers who have made some of their most interesting contributions in this short form. Selected works from 19th- and 20th-century writers are read closely. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

In this examination of the modern theatre of Spain and Latin America, students read and analyze plays from Spanish-speaking countries in their aesthetic and cultural contexts. When possible, students perform scenes from some of the plays.

Credits: 4

Department: Language and Culture

Students are introduced to the theory of translation, as it has developed over time and has dealt with questions from linguists, poets, anthropologists, and gender theorists. Taken in conjunction with SPA 3735.

Credits: 2

COREQ: SPA3735

Department: Language and Culture

Students produce, refine, evaluate, and reflect on translations from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Particular emphasis on the translation of fiction and poetry. Taken in conjunction with SPA 3730.

Credits: 2

COREQ: SPA3730

Department: Language and Culture

Begins with a brief presentation of some theoretical aspects of translation, after which students become directly involved in translating both from English to Spanish and from Spanish to English. Literary texts representing a wide variety of styles are selected. Particular attention is given to idiomatic aspects of each language.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SPA3016

Department: Language and Culture

Chinese

Description:

The minor in Chinese is designed to provide students with basic knowledge of written and spoken modern Chinese, and to introduce them to the culture, politics, and literature of Asian countries.

Students interested in the minor should submit a complete Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in Chinese after consultation with the appropriate faculty.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Chinese

Five courses (20 credits), as follows:

  1. CHI 1010/Beginning Chinese I
  2. CHI 1020/Beginning Chinese II
  3. CHI 2010/Intermediate Chinese I
  4. CHI 2020/Intermediate Chinese II
  5. CHI 3010/Advanced Chinese I

Foreign Language Placement

Related Interdisciplinary Minor: Asian Studies


French

Description:

The minor in French is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written French and to provide a general introduction to the culture and literature of France and the Francophone nations.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in French after consultation with the coordinator of the Language and Culture Board of Study.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in French

Five courses in French (20 credits), as follows:

  1. Two courses must be chosen from advanced-level French courses.
  2. One course must be in cultural studies:
    • ARH 2050: Introduction to Modern Art, 4 credits
    • ARH 3510: 19th Centrury Art, 4 credits
    • ARH 3630: French Art from LaTour to David, 4 credits
    • HIS 3380: Paris, Vienna, Berlin, 4 credits
    • HIS 2330: Atlantic World, 4 credits
    • CIN 3420: Contemporary European Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3550: Francophone Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3835: André Bazin, Realism, and Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3855: French Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 3857: Contemporary French Cinema, 4 credits
    • CIN 4210: Theory and Praxis: Welles and Resnais, 4 credits
    • LIT 3680: Surrealism and its Legacy, 4 credits
    • PHI 2060: Existentialism, 4 credits
    • PHI 3470: Foucault, Habermas, Derrida, 4 credits
  3. The remaining two courses must be chosen from various courses in French and in translation.

Foreign Language Placement


Italian

Description:

Students majoring in any discipline may pursue a minor in Italian, which is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written Italian and a general introduction to Italian culture.


Students who complete the minor in Italian should achieve proficiency in the language equivalent to ITA 2020/Intermediate Italian II. All students interested in Italian are strongly encouraged to participate in the college’s summer study abroad program in Italy.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in Italian after consultation with the coordinator of the Language and Culture Board of Study.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Italian

Five courses, as follows:

  1. ITA 1010/Beginning Italian I
  2. ITA 1020/Beginning Italian II
  3. ITA 2010/Intermediate Italian I
  4. ITA 2020/Intermediate Italian II
  5. One elective course related to Italian studies, chosen in consultation with the minor advisor

Foreign Language Placement


Spanish

Description:

The minor in Spanish is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written Spanish and a general introduction to the culture and literature of Spain and Latin America.


Students who complete the minor in Spanish should achieve proficiency in the language equivalent to SPA 3015/Advanced Spanish. All students interested in Spanish are strongly encouraged to participate in the college’s summer study abroad program in Spain.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in Spanish after consultation with the coordinator of the Language and Culture Board of Study.

Related Interdisciplinary Minor:

Latin American, Caribbean, and LatinX Studies

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Spanish

Five courses in Spanish above the level of SPA 1010 and 1020/Beginning Spanish I and II, chosen in consultation with the minor advisor.

Foreign Language Placement


Linguistics

Description:

The minor in linguistics is designed for students who are fascinated by language.


Linguistics investigates language as a self-contained system (sounds, words, sentences), as a component of culture and society, and as a cognitive and neurological operation of individuals. It also intersects with a range of academic disciplines whose subject matter, in one way or another, involves language. Therefore, this minor is particularly valuable for students whose primary field of study is language, sociology, anthropology, music, psychology, philosophy, or literature.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office.

Minor requirements:

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Linguistics

Five courses (19–20 credits), as follows:

  • LAC 3430/An Introduction to Linguistics
  • And four electives, chosen from the following:
    Anthropology:
    ANT 2175/Language, Culture, and Society
    Language and Culture:
    FRE 3730/Translation Theory and FRE 3735/French Translation
    LAC 3000/Syntax and Semantics
    LAC 3360/Methods of Language Teaching (formerly LAC 3350)
    LAC 3400/Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (added Spring 2018)
    SPA 3450/The Structure of Spanish: Grammar, Morphology, and Syntax
    SPA 3730/Translation Theory and SPA 3735/Spanish Translation
    Philosophy:
    PHI 2120/Methods of Reasoning
    Psychology:
    PSY 3320/Language and Thought
    PSY 3490/Development of Language (added Spring 2018)

Note: FRE 3730 and 3735 count as one elective and must be taken together. Likewise, SPA 3730 and 3735 count as one elective and must be taken together.


Latin American, Carribean, and Latinx Studies

Description:

The major in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies at Purchase College is designed as a multidisciplinary immersion experience that prepares students for life in a globalized world.

Along with an introductory course on Latin American history, students are required to take courses in at least two different disciplines, drawing from courses on or related to Latin America in the social sciences, the humanities, or the arts. All students are required to have or to attain language proficiency, defined as the equivalent of five semesters in Spanish, French, or Portuguese.

Experiential learning is a central and distinctive feature of this major: all students fulfill this requirement by completing a service-learning project or an internship in a local Latin American/Latino community, school, or nonprofit, or through a study abroad program. Students synthesize this experiential learning with the knowledge gained from their coursework in an in-depth, two-semester senior project.

Graduates of this program will be able to demonstrate knowledge of Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx history, geography, cultural traditions and innovations, political structures, and social issues and will possess an in-depth awareness of Latin America’s diversity as well as its role in global processes.

What can you do with a degree in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies?

Opportunities exist in a wide variety of fields, nationally and internationally. In a world that is increasingly transnational and cross-racial, individuals with a solid knowledge of Spanish, French, and/or Portuguese and an understanding of Latin American and Latino history and major contemporary issues, including immigration, are needed for this century’s jobs and careers.

In addition, with Latin American immigrant communities increasing in number throughout the U.S., there is a broad range of career and volunteer options available. Internationally, options include positions in government and in nongovernmental for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

Students are also encouraged to double-major in another program to increase their opportunities after graduation.

Program Name Change

Effective February 2020, the Latin American Studies program was renamed Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, all Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies majors must complete the following requirements (37–43 credits):

  • Foreign language proficiency
    This major requires proficiency in Spanish, French, or Portuguese, equivalent to five semesters of the language. Students can fulfill this proficiency in any of the following ways:
    1. through an exemption based on an assessment of proficiency in Spanish, French, or Portuguese by a member of the faculty
    2. through successful completion of a course conducted in Spanish or French at or above the advanced language level
    3. through successful completion of the minor in Spanish or French
  • HIS 1600/Introduction to Latin American Studies: 3 credits
  • Six approved electives in Latin American and Latino studies (18–24 credits)
    Students must take six approved electives that are directly related to Latin America or Latino studies, as outlined below. Up to four credits of an advanced-level language course may be used toward this requirement. Approved courses offered in the target language in which the main focus is on literary, cultural, or historical subject matter are not subject to the four-credit restriction.
    • Two electives chosen from courses in anthropology, environmental studies, political science, and/or sociology
    • Two electives chosen from courses in language and culture, history, and/or literature
    • Two electives chosen from courses in art history and/or cinema studies
    Students should consult with their faculty advisor to determine if a course from another discipline is an appropriate elective.
  • One of the following methods courses: 4 credits
    SOC 3405/Research Methods
    ANT 3560/Fieldwork: Qualitative Methods
    HIS 3880/Junior History Seminar
    Or a designated upper-level course in the humanities or the arts that provides senior project preparation, to be chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor
  • Experiential learning—one of the following: 4 credits
    LST 3050/Experiential Learning in Latin American Studies
    LST 3995/Internship in Latin American Studies
    Or an approved study-abroad program
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I: 4 credits
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II: 4 credits

Art History (School of Humanities):
ARH 3335/Latin American Art in the Age of Globalization
ARH 3815/Mexican Art From the Revolution to the NAFTA Era
ARH 4590/Pre-Columbian Aesthetics in Modern Latin American Art

Cinema Studies (School of Film and Media Studies):
CIN 3000/Cinema and Revolution
CIN 3080/Mexican Cinema
CIN 3245/Latin American Cinema

Economics (School of Natural and Social Sciences):
ECO 2223/Economies of Latin America

Environmental Studies (School of Natural and Social Sciences):
ENV 3420/Tropical Ecosystems

French (School of Humanities):
FRE 3067/French Caribbean Literature
FRE 3230/The Island as Laboratory
LAC 3340/Postcolonial French-Language Literature

History (School of Humanities):
HIS 2005/Modern Latin America
HIS 2170/Colonial Latin America
HIS 2215/Latinos and Cities in the Americas
HIS 2540/Society and Culture in Modern Brazil
HIS 3005/Representations of Latinos and Latinas in American Film, 1930–2000
HIS 3085/Cities and Citizenship in the Americas (added Fall 2018)
HIS 3395/Nation and Revolution in Latin America
HIS 3555/African Diasporas in the Americas
HIS 3625/Slaves and Enslavement in the Americas
HIS 3685/Sex and Gender in Latin America
HIS 3855/Oral History Workshop

Literature (School of Humanities):
LIT 3685/Modern Novel of Latin America

Music (Conservatory of Music):
MTH 2230/World Music and Jazz Traditions

Political Science (School of Natural and Social Sciences):
POL 3130/Immigration: Policies, Problems, and Politics
POL 3300/Development and Politics of Latin America
POL 3307/Politics and Memoir
POL 3340/U.S./Latin American Relations
POL 3361/Cuba, Latin America, and the U.S.
POL 3570/Human Rights

Sociology (School of Natural and Social Sciences):
SOC 1030/Cultural Activism in Latin America
SOC 3056/Global Social Movements
SOC 3661/Border Wars and Transnational Human Rights
SOC 3725/Globalization, Culture, Social Change: Latin America

Spanish (School of Humanities):
SPA 3211/Spanish and Latin American Cinema
SPA 3365/Languages and Cultures of Spanish-Speaking Countries*
SPA 3370/Lettered Cities: The Literatures of Latin American Cities
SPA 3630/The Modern Latin American Novel*
SPA 3687/The Idea of Latin America
SPA 3700/The Latin American Short Story*
*Taught in Spanish

Theatre and Performance (Conservatory of Theatre Arts):
THP 3650/Contemporary U.S. Latino Theatre

Updates to the 2019–20 College Catalog:

  • Effective February 2020, the Latin American Studies program was renamed Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies.

Minor requirements:

The minor in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies is designed to provide students with a basic interdisciplinary grounding in the culture, history, and politics of Latin America.

Students interesting in pursuing this minor must submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study. Because new courses may be added to the curriculum from time to time, students should also consult with the coordinator of the Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies program.

Recommended: Basic Spanish

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies

Five courses, as follows:

  1. HIS 1600/Introduction to Latin American Studies
  2. Plus four electives in Latin American studies

Elective Courses

Examples of elective courses available for the minor in Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx studies are listed under the academic requirements for the major.


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Sociology
    • BA, Colorado College
    • MA, PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Assistant Professor of Language and Culture
    Coordinator of Language Programs and Linguistics Minor
    • BA, MA, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
    • MA, Universidad Complutense de Madrid
    • MA, PhD, University of Southern California
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies and History
    Director, School of Film and Media Studies
    • PhD, University of Maryland
  • Assistant Professor of Playwriting
    • BA, Goddard College
    • MFA, University of Southern California
  • Assistant Professor of Theatre and Performance
    • BA, Harvard University
    • MFA, New York University
  • Assistant Professor of History
    • BA, University of Buenos Aires (Argentina)
    • PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Alex Gordon Curator of Art of the Americas, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • MA, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
    • BA, MA, PhD, University of Montreal
  • Professor of Sociology
    • BA, MA, MPA, PhD, Syracuse University
  • Associate Professor of Spanish and Literature
    • BA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Associate Professor of Cinema Studies
    • BA, Universidad Iberoamericana (Mexico)
    • MA, New York University
    • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

Contributing Faculty

  • Alex Gordon Curator of Art of the Americas, Neuberger Museum of Art
    • MA, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
    • BA, MA, PhD, University of Montreal

Courses

Liberal Arts

Description:

Students who wish to pursue an individualized, interdisciplinary program of study that cannot be accommodated within another major at Purchase College may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts (BALA) program.

Each student works closely with two or more faculty sponsors from different disciplines to design a course of study that meets both the specialized interests of the student and the academic standards of the college.

This degree program appeals especially to students interested in constructing highly individualized and innovative major areas of study. Some examples include bioethics, Mediterranean studies, philosophy of science, and choreography of literature. Students may also work with the faculty in established programs currently offering minors, which could provide core coursework that serves as a basis for a major.

Requirements:

Students in this program must meet general degree requirements for the BA.

Students design a proposed curriculum for the major in collaboration with two or more faculty sponsors. This proposal is reviewed by the BALA committee, which may include faculty representatives from the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the School of the Arts. Although individualized in nature, all proposals must:

  1. include relevant theoretical and methodological courses in the proposed area(s) of study
  2. incorporate the teaching specialties of the Purchase College faculty
  3. demonstrate why established majors or programs of study at Purchase College cannot accommodate the student’s needs

A senior project is required of all BALA students. Approval of the proposal may be contingent upon inclusion of additional courses recommended by the BALA committee.

Representative Courses

Courses span the entire curriculum at Purchase College, according to the student’s specific area of interdisciplinary study.

Questions? Contact the faculty coordinator of the BALA program.


Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA, Brandeis University
    • PhD, Yale University

Literature

Description:

Students majoring in literature at Purchase College learn to read texts closely and critically and to understand literature in relation to the social and historical conditions in which it is written and read.

Program Highlights

  • The principal focus of the major is British and American literature; the program places these national literatures in an international frame. Thus, students may count toward the major courses in French, Spanish, and other literatures, in translation or in the original language.
  • In addition to courses in traditional literatures, students may take courses in contemporary literature, theatre, popular culture, and film.
  • Feminist inquiry, the critical study of race, and other theoretical or interdisciplinary approaches are central to the literature curriculum.
  • In learning to read, write, and think about literature and the world it reflects, inhabits, and creates, students gain valuable preparation for advanced academic study and for the professional world.

Requirements:

In addition to meeting general degree requirements, literature majors must complete a minimum of 10 literature courses, plus an 8-credit senior project, as outlined below.

  • LIT 2450/Colloquium I: Studies in Literature*
    *Generally taken in the second year; transfer students who want to major in literature must complete this course during their first semester at Purchase.
  • Three courses in the literature sequence (courses that emphasize issues of history and period): One each from sequence I (before 1750), II (1750–1900), and III (1900–present)
  • One course in Shakespeare
  • At least three elective literature courses (see notes below)
  • LIT 4450/Colloquium II: Advanced Studies in Literature*
    *Generally taken in the second semester of the junior year
  • LIT 4885/Senior Project Seminar
  • SPJ 4990/Senior Project I
  • SPJ 4991/Senior Project II

Of the 10 literature courses:

  • No more than two may be taken through the School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education, with permission of advisor.
  • At least five must be at the 3000 or 4000 level (LIT 4450 counts toward this requirement; LIT 4885 does not).
  • At least four must be taken at Purchase College.
  • Students may not use the required Shakespeare course to satisfy the Sequence I requirement. For example, THP 2205 may be taken to fulfill the Sequence I requirement or the Shakespeare course requirement, but not both.
  • Certain courses in language and culture and in theatre and performance (THP prefix) may fulfill the requirements. These courses are cross-referenced in the list of literature courses.
  • Students may count toward the major up to 8 credits of writing courses at the 3000 or 4000 level. Writing courses at the 2000 level may not be counted toward the major requirements.
  • All courses taken to satisfy major requirements, excluding the senior project, must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

Course Sequences for the Major and Minor

For the minor in literature: Comparative literature courses in the sequences are indicated with an asterisk.

HIS 2120/Princes, Priests, and Peasants*
LIT 2080/The Ancient Epic*
LIT 3127/Early Modern English Poetry
LIT 3140/Medieval English Literature*
LIT 3142/Chivalry and Romance
LIT 3150/Chaucer
LIT 3155/Renaissance in England
LIT 3160/Literature of the High Middle Ages*
LIT 3220/The Renaissance in Europe*
LIT 3250/Milton
LIT 3822/Dread, Sadness, and Grief in Early English Literature
LIT 3825/British Poetry I: Beginnings to 1650
LIT 4050/The Bible in Medieval and Early Modern Literature*
LIT 4180/Dante and Medieval Culture*
PHI 3205/Shakespeare and Philosophy
SPA 3705/Cervantes (in English)
THP 2205/Shakespeare Then and Now*
THP 2885/Theatre Histories I*
THP 3140/Medieval and Renaissance English Drama*

LIT 2375/Classics of European Fiction*
LIT 2560/Survey of U.S. Literature I
LIT 2570/Survey of U.S. Literature II
LIT 3003/Dostoevsky and Tolstoy*
LIT 3017/Eighteenth-Century British Women Writers
LIT 3082/19th-Century British Literature and Empire
LIT 3121/Comparative 19th-Century Novel*
LIT 3271/The Age of Reason
LIT 3315/The 19th-Century Novel in the U.S.
LIT 3320/The 19th-Century British Novel
LIT 3330/Romanticism I
LIT 3340/Romanticism II
LIT 3355/Romanticism and Empire
LIT 3369/Victorian Poetry
LIT 3540/Emerson
LIT 3581/Realism and Naturalism in U.S. Literature
LIT 3630/Melville
LIT 3673/Austen
LIT 4675/George Eliot and Henry James
LIT 4685/Whitman and Dickinson

HIS 3180/British Culture and Society in the 20th Century
HIS 3424/Modern and Postcolonial France*
FRE 3710/Classics of French Literature on Film
JST 3709/Theatrical Representations of the Holocaust*
LAC 3340/Postcolonial French-Language Literature
LIT 1190/Modernism: The 20th Century*
LIT 2195/Italian American Literature and Popular Culture
LIT 2388/Literature of the African Diaspora*
LIT 2675/Literature and the City*
LIT 2825/Modernism and the Metropolis*
LIT 2872/The Golden Land: American Jewish Literature and Film
LIT 3007/Visions of Dystopia
LIT 3008/Literature of Disruption
LIT 3012/The Lives of James Baldwin
LIT 3043/Toni Morrison
LIT 3093/Immigration and Ethnicity in U.S. Literature
LIT 3195/The Vietnam War in U.S. Literature and Film
LIT 3215/South Asian Literature*
LIT 3226/Literature of Decolonization in South Asia*
LIT 3265/Kafka*
LIT 3266/Kafka to Roth*
LIT 3310/Modern Poetry in the U.S. and Latin America*
LIT 3380/Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
LIT 3415/Global Metafictions*
LIT 3420/Modern Poetry*
LIT 3427/20th-Century World Literature*
LIT 3432/The Roaring Twenties
LIT 3490/James Joyce
LIT 3532/Body, Race, Performance*
LIT 3555/Modern British Literature
LIT 3575/Virginia Woolf
LIT 3605/Jazz and the Literary Imagination
LIT 3633/The Beat Generation
LIT 3635/Reviewing the Contemporary Novel
LIT 3680/Surrealism and Its Legacy*
LIT 3685/Modern Novel of Latin America (in English)*
LIT 3695/Contemporary U.S. Literature
LIT 3721/Contemporary Jewish American Fiction
LIT 3725/Literature of the Holocaust*
LIT 3745/Identity and Self-Fashioning
LIT 3839/The Modern Novel*
LIT 3845/Zora Neale Hurston
LIT 3915/Magical Realism*
LIT 4190/Williams and Faulkner
LIT 4240/Science Fiction
LIT 4690/Contemporary U.S. Poetry
SPA 3370/Lettered Cities: The Literatures of Latin American Cities
THP 2600/American Drama: From O’Neill to Albee
THP 3495/Black American Drama
THP 3690/American Theatre in Our Time
THP 3750/European Drama in Our Time*

Please note that these courses do not fulfill the sequence requirement.

ARH 3040/Vermeer in the World
FRE 3067/French Caribbean Literature
LAC 3250/Space as Construction
LIT 1065/Only Connect: Difference and Otherness in Literature
LIT 1140/The West and Others
LIT 1150/Border Crossings
LIT 2387/Literature of the South Asian Diaspora
LIT 2388/Literature of the African Diaspora
LIT 2590/Mythologies
LIT 3008/Literature of Disruption
LIT 3025/Women and Film
LIT 3047/Literature and Film of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
LIT 3157/Novel Pairings
LIT 3267/Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Kafka: The Short Stories
LIT 3396/Fiction of Eastern Europe
LIT 3415/Global Metafictions
LIT 3427/20th Century World Literature
LIT 3676/Short Narrative
LIT 3915/Magical Realism
LIT 3940/Literature of War
PHI 2835/Happiness: Philosophy, Film, Literature
POL 3307/Politics and Memoir
SPA 3687/The Idea of Latin America
THP 3250/Theories of Drama and Performance
THP 3427/European Drama in Our Time

Minor requirements:

The minor in literature is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study literature in a comparative context.

Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the faculty coordinator of the Literature Board of Study.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in Literature

Five courses in English and comparative literature, as follows:

  1. A maximum of two 2000-level courses or
    one 1000-level and one 2000-level course
  2. At least three upper-level (3000- or 4000-level) courses
  3. Of the five courses, two must chosen from two different literature sequences.
  4. Of the five courses, one must be comparative.

Faculty

  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • AB, Harvard University
    • MA, MPhil, PhD, Yale University
  • Professor of Literature
    • BA, Yale University
    • MA, PhD, Rutgers University
    • Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching
  • Assistant Professor of Literature
    • BA, SUNY Buffalo
    • MA, University of Rochester
    • PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Lecturer in Literature
    • BA, Purchase College, SUNY
    • MA, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of French and Literature
    • BA, Trent University (Canada)
    • MA, Queen’s University (Canada)
    • MA, PhD, Yale University
  • Lecturer in Jewish Studies
    • BA, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
    • MA, PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Associate Professor of Spanish and Literature
    • BA, Columbia University
    • PhD, University of Pennsylvania
  • Visiting Assistant Professor of Literature
    • BA and MA, University of Texas, El Paso
    • PhD, Texas Tech University
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA (Honors), University of Delhi (India)
    • MA, MPhil, PhD, Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor of Literature
    • BA, Queens College, City University of New York
    • MA, PhD, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor of Literature
    • BA, Brandeis University
    • PhD, Yale University
  • Associate Professor of Literature and Writing
    Chair, School of Humanities
    • BA, MA, PhD, Columbia University

Courses

Half of this team-taught course is devoted to examining Johannes Vermeer’s subjects, painting techniques, and reception. The other half examines the invention and use of comparable subjects and literary techniques during the three eras in which Vermeer figured prominently on the global stage: the Dutch Golden Age, the American Gilded Age, and the US financial boom of the 1990s.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Racial imagery in the U.S., from the minstrel era to the present, is examined. Students interrogate the mythologies of this imagery as depicted in U.S. literature and film; rethink key analytical categories in cinema and literary studies in light of U.S. race history (genre and spectatorship); and study the racial uses of and meanings behind certain technical innovations in U.S. literature and filmmaking.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A study of major developments in French Caribbean literature of the 19th through 21st centuries. This course focuses on questions of language, race, gender, geography, and class, with emphasis on local, regional, and global frames of reference.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Islands, because of their size and supposed isolation, have been the site of environmental and military experiments. Similarly, writers have used the island to build a textual laboratory in order to test their philosophical and narrative experiments. In this course, students will look at novels (including graphic novels) to examine this scientific, military and narrative instrumentalization of the island.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Students look at the evolution of long-form journalism of postwar America, roughly defined as 1946–1980. Works include Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, John Hersey’s Hiroshima, and the magazine writing of Lillian Ross, Alex Haley, Joan Didion, and Gay Talese. The class also explores more recent authors, such as Isabel Wilkerson and Rachel Aviv, and the influences of the digital age.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Critics agree that the world of the concentration camps and ghettoes is impossible to duplicate on stage. Despite serious aesthetic and practical constraints, playwrights in Europe, Israel, and America have, for the last five decades, created a diverse group of plays dealing with this unprecedented 20th-century event. Works examined in class include documentary dramas, realistic reenactments, absurdist plays, a comedy, and a standup routine.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The literatures of former French colonies are deeply concerned with questions of space: territory, displacement, indigeneity and migration. This course analyzes recurrent spatial tropes (the island, the plantation, the border, etc.) in the French-language literatures of the Caribbean, the Indian Ocean and Africa to see how received notions of space, including literature as textual space, are reinvented.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

We will look at French-language texts from the Caribbean, Indian Ocean and Africa. Emphasis will be on transnational conflicts and solidarities. Texts will be read and taught in English, but French majors and minors are encouraged to read the texts in the original French.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Witness literature come alive! Students read work by well-known authors visiting Purchase in the Durst lecture series and read plays staged by the Theatre Program. Students meet independently with authors and attend their public lectures. Directors visit the class and students receive free tickets to all plays. Classwork analyzes material before and after students meet authors and attend plays.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A study of the eastern Mediterranean during New Testament times—the conflict of Jewish and Roman cultures that mark the beginning of the Common Era. While the primary focus is on literary texts, visual arts as well as historical documents and accounts are also included.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

What is it we are talking about when we address “Nature”? The closer we look, the more difficult the question becomes. The class looks closely at “Nature,” primarily through various literary texts, as well as through images and videos, considering topics and issues of “natural history,” environmental politics, etc.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

What is beauty? How does one recognize it? How do—or how should—people respond to it? What is its relation to justice? This interdisciplinary humanities course examines such fundamental questions with the help of philosophers, theologians, neuroscientists, poets, and artists of all kinds.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Students trace the development of non-Western identity as it is formulated within the West by examining marginalized characters who are shaped by their powerlessness. Topics include educating the native, victimage, Orientalism, backwardness, and gender. Authors include William Shakespeare, Thomas Babbington Macaulay, Aphra Behn, Mary Shelley, Emily Brontë, William Beckford, Rudyard Kipling, E.M. Forster, Katherine Mayo, and Rukeya Sakhawat Hossein.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores some of the history, institutions, economy, society, and culture of Britain as a dominant European cultural power and also as an imperial power influencing its colonial possessions. Race and gender are examined, as are the shifting hierarchies between and within cultures. Included are Aphra Behn, E.M. Foster, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, Rudyard Kipling, John Stewart Mill, William Shakespeare, and Mary Shelley.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Social borders are examined through literature that explores immigration, assimilation, and the experience of those who exist “between” cultures. A major focus is on the “hybridizing” of cultures and the way that literature expresses the blending of cultures through language and narrative structure.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A selection of literary and philosophical texts from the Western cultural tradition during the past 2,000 years, with special emphasis on the lenses through which later ages select, read, and construct the past from the present. Texts include works by St. Augustine, Shakespeare, Freud, Marx, Joyce, Brecht, and a selection of contemporary works of film and stage. Where available, texts from the Western tradition being staged on campus are used.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The beginning of the 20th century witnessed an extraordinary ferment and experimental attitude in the arts. This course examines the rise of abstraction and experimentalism in literature, painting, music, and dance in Europe and America from 1899 to the 1950s. The course also considers the artistic breakthroughs of Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Graham, Cézanne, Picasso, Mallarmé, Eliot, Pound, and de Kooning, among others.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An introduction to the principles and practice of close reading and literary criticism. Readings include a variety of literary modes, including fiction, poetry, and drama.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The rise of the novel and its continued relevance today. In addition to close readings of novels from a variety of time periods and countries, students read about the conditions that gave rise to the novel as a genre and various theoretical interpretations of the form and its functions.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of a wide array of poems from classical antiquity to the 21st century. In this course, students consider the multiple ways that poetry works to create meaning and emotion and investigate techniques of close analysis. Particularly recommended for students interested in the study of literature, creative writing, and language.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Read multi-genre literature and social histories and identify and analyze the distinctions and similarities that have shaped the experiences and the cultural imagination among different Latinx communities. Topics include identity formation and negotiation in terms of language, race, gender, sexuality, and class; discuss diaspora and emigration. Authors include Gloria Anzaldúa and Piri Thomas. Taught in English.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Literature inhabits, reflects, creates, and ironically examines the “history” that is its context. This course observes the central narrative of American history, American institutions and anti-institutions, and the American international situation through the peculiar lens of American poetry, fiction, cinema, and other literary arts.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A reading of texts embodying the oldest myths of Western culture: the Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, and Metamorphosis. Works are considered both in their historical context and from the perspective of recent thought.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines black literary and performance culture from the 18th century to the present. Students explore the self-making and resistance of black authors and activists through literary culture. Discussions focus on the intersections of identity formation (race, gender, sexuality, class) to enhance an understanding of the broader tradition of American letters and black culture. Readings include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and Zora Neale Hurston.

Credits: 3

Department: Literature

Readings explore postcolonial and other contemporary global literary representations of animals and the environment, specifically their engagement with narratives of colonization and development, human-centeredness, and the posthuman. Students will consider how these representations invite readers to re-think hierarchical and human-centered visions of our world.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines how literature is shaped by intersections of the local and the global in examples drawn from five regions: North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Short stories by important U.S. writers of fiction, from the beginnings of the literary tradition in the earlier 19th century (Poe, Hawthorne, Melville) to current authors. As the sequence of stories unfolds, the development of American issues unfolds as well.

Credits: 3

Department: Literature

Short works of French, Russian, and German fiction, beginning with 18th-century quarrels between classicism and romanticism and ending with multicultural influences on the creation of 20th-century “classics.”

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Students read about South Asians dislocated from their homeland, focusing on issues of cultural displacement, alienation, assimilation, and construction as they follow narratives of South Asians who attempt to preserve the traces of their ethnic, cultural, and religious identities. Authors include Jhumpa Lahiri, Bharati Mukherjee, V.S. Naipaul, and Amitav Ghosh, among others.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Readings include literature by 21st century writers of African descent living around the globe, with special focus on the Black Atlantic region. Students consider the texts’ engagement with issues of modernity, postmodernity, identity, belonging, and citizenship. Authors include Zadie Smith, Edwidge Danticat, Teju Cole, and Taiye Selasi.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An introduction to literary study for current and prospective literature majors. Readings are divided among three areas: primary texts, secondary texts that offer contexts for the primary texts, and works that define the study of literature. Each course section addresses its own topic.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Readings illustrate the range of issues, styles, and contexts in the Bible, including Genesis and Exodus, Deuteronomic Histories, prophets major and minor, Job and Ecclesiastes, the Gospels, and Apocalypse. This is not a course in religion, but in a literary and cultural tradition deeply concerned with human action in relation to divinity.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Spans the literature of the European invasion of North America, from the 16th century through the first decades of a national publishing industry of “American” letters following the Revolutionary War. Students consider the connections between writing and colonialism, nation building, and the resistance of these powerful narratives in, for example, the few written words of the indigenous populations and the enslaved.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of literature written in the U.S. between the 1830s and the beginning of the 20th century. Careful attention is paid to the context of western expansion, slavery and its legacy, industrialization, immigration, and other historical developments. While much of the course is devoted to the “American Renaissance,” students also consider several contemporaneous literary traditions and their interrelationships.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Myths are the narrative form of a culture’s essential knowledge—of itself, its origins, its contexts. This course substantially engages Greek and Roman mythology as well as myths from many time periods and cultures (biblical, South Asian, Native American, contemporary, and more). Theoretical approaches are also considered.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An exploration of how British writers have responded to the social, historical, and intellectual ferment of the 20th century. Authors studied may include as T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, W.H. Auden, Samuel Beckett, V.S. Naipaul, and Muriel Spark.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Engage with literary texts and cinematic productions such as Sozaboy, Beasts of No Nation, A Long Way Gone, War Witch, and Kony 2012 which portray children forced to the front lines of war. What meaning is carried through these literary and cinematic texts? How do genre, point of view, language, medium, etc. impact our reading of these narratives?

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A survey of British literature from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, with a particular focus on the history of literary form and the birth of a vernacular tradition in English.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A survey of British literature from Alexander Pope’s “The Rape of the Lock” to Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire, with a particular focus on the development of a national literature in the dual contexts of empire and transnational modernism.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explore texts that use literary tropes/techniques to create fact-based narratives. Study the formal aspects of this literature as well as its thematic content, paying close attention to its use in works by women and people of color. Topics include speculation, testimony, and archival work among others. Authors include Saidiya Hartman and Ta-Nehisi Coates. Taught in English.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The relationship between the developments of urban modernity and aesthetic modernism is charted through the first half of the 20th century in three major metropolitan centers: Paris, London, and New York. The focus is on British and American modernist poetry and novels.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A study of the cultural, literary, and natural history of birds. Students read poems and essays, study ornithology texts and field guides, and occasionally go into the field to look at birds. Owning a pair of binoculars would be helpful.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Beginning as a response to the immigrant experience, writing by American Jews emerged as a central literary presence and the inspiration for important films. This course traces the evolution from early writers such as Abraham Cahan and Anzia Yezierska, through major figures such as Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, and I.B. Singer, to their contemporaries and heirs, including Stanley Elkin, Joseph Heller, Cynthia Ozick, and Grace Paley.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Engages the question “Dostoevsky or Tolstoy?” through readings of some major works, emphasizing The Brothers Karamazov and Anna Karenina as examples of “dialogic” vs. “monologic” narratives.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A writing-intensive course in which students study the poetry of queer-identified writers through the lenses of sexuality, culture, identity, history, and poetic technique.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines literary dystopian visions from H.G. Wells’ science fiction classic The Time Machine (1895), Franz Kafka’s The Trial (1920), and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World (1932) to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985), Cormac McCarthy’s The Road (2006), Don DeLillo’s Zero K (2016), and Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Read a broad cross-section of writings by international authors to facilitate discussion of global and local values that emerge from and respond to disruptive events, such as 9/11 and global pandemics that disorient cultural arrangements and reset social formations. Topics include terror, isolation and alienation, fragility, silence, nostalgia, and the human capacity for recovery and resilience.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the intertwined histories of race and the American police state, with a specific focus on the relationship between US policing practices and crime fiction. Students read literature by Poe, Doyle, Hammett, Christie, Wright, Himes, and others, as well as histories and theoretical texts about race, policing, and the different types of crime fiction (detective fiction, police procedurals, mysteries, etc.).

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

We will examine Baldwin’s moving fictional and nonfictional works to understand his enduring legacy up through our contemporary moment. Students read Baldwin’s work through the lens of literary history, civil rights, transnational black activism, the arts, and queer theory. Major texts include The Fire Next Time, Another Country, If Beale Street Could Talk, and Giovanni’s Room.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Considers the intersections of sexual difference and cinema. Topics include theories of enunciation and sexual difference, female authorship and the idea of “women’s cinema,” gender and genre, woman as spectacle, the female spectator, and feminist film theory. Representations of sexual difference in films by selected male directors are studied as a means of examining the institution(s) of cinematic expression. The bulk of the course is devoted to studying women directors as they attempt to work within and against that institution.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An investigation of the formation of the literary canon and the women who were written out of it. Students become familiar with the novel form as well as genres such as amatory fiction and the Jacobin novel, and read a selection of the most influential women writers of the long eighteenth century.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An investigation of the styles and ideas of “prose” in American literature, fiction and nonfiction. The particular focus is on the sentence—for example, sentences by such writers as Henry James, Melville, Anne Carson, and others. Is there something distinctly “American” about the American sentence? Is there a theory of prose that might emerge?

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An exploration of Toni Morrison’s generous literary career as a playwright, fiction writer, and essayist. Students read a collection of Morrison’s most popular works (Bluest Eye, Sula, Beloved) alongside her more recent publications (A Mercy, God Help the Child). Discussions place Morrison in conversation with her literary interlocutors (Hurston, Woolf, Faulkner) and some of her most cherished contemporaries (James Baldwin, Toni Cade Bambara).

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores a variety of literary and cinematic works that depict the conflicting points of view and the varied interests of contemporary Israeli and Arab writers and filmmakers. Students learn the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict and then explore a variety of issues relating to it by reading the work of Amos Oz, David Grossman, Mahmood Darwish, and others. Films include Paradise Now (Hany Abu-Assad, 2005) and Lemon Tree (Eran Riklis, 2008).

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores how ideas about anger influence the tumultuous history of England between 1350 and 1675: an era in which widespread rage against an increasingly unjust establishment fueled massive revolts. In addition to reading historical sources chronicling a variety of uprisings, students read literature by William Langland, John Gower, Margery Kempe, and William Shakespeare that influenced and/or reflected upon these events.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the representation of colonized places and people in the British literary imagination during the 19th century. Topics include otherness, difference, exoticism, transculturation, assimilation, and hybridity. Authors include Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Joseph Conrad, Thomas de Quincey, Rider Haggard, William Jones, Rudyard Kipling, Thomas Moore, Olive Schreiner, and Robert Southey.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

No American geographical fact is more significant than the West less a place than an idea, an imaginative provocation. Many American writers have been provoked to represent the West, and students read from among their work, including such writers as Raymond Chandler, Sandra Cisneros, Jack London, Nathanael West, Walter Van Tilburg Clark, Willa Cather, and many poets.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

We are “a nation of immigrants,” wrote John F. Kennedy. Beginning in the 1880s and continuing to the present, this course explores issues surrounding immigration, ethnicity, and nationality through the lens of immigrant writing. Students look at shifts and continuities over time and among diverse ethnic groups and explore how America creates ethnicity and immigrants create America.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the narrative strategies and genres that Black American writers have used to publicize discrepancies between Western discourses of freedom and liberality and the realities of slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the prison industrial complex. Students read literary and nonliterary works by writers including Olaudah Equiano, Ralph Ellison, and Michelle Alexander.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A study of four major novels, their respective national obsessions, and contrasting historical contexts (British: Dickens’ Great Expectations; American: Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter; French: Balzac’s Eugenie Grandet; Russian: Dostoevsky’s The Possessed). Texts are read in conjunction with historical background material.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An exploration of representative poems in English and associated poetical theories from the late medieval and early modern period (c. 1450–1660), including erotic and religious lyrics, epic and narrative poems, and the emergence of women poets. Poets studied include Wyatt, Spenser, Philip, Robert and Mary Sidney, Southwell, Greville, Ralegh, Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Herbert, and Crashaw.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the literature of England written in French, English, and Latin from the Norman Conquest of 1066 (when England was taken over by a Francophone elite) to the 15th century. Epic, romance, history, and the literature of spiritual devotion are read in their literary relations and social contexts. All readings are in translation.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Covers the literary genre of romance in the late Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. Examines the genre’s roots in classical tales of epic travels, adventure, and fantasy. Includes chivalry, heroism, questing, hospitality, and courtliness and attends to the genre’s place in the periods’ cross-cultural and cross-class encounters. Texts include Arthurian legends, Gawain, Spenser’s Faerie Queene, Shakespeare, Orlando Furioso, Gerusalemme liberata, and Don Quixote.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A study of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales for students who want an introduction to medieval studies and for those who wish to extend their knowledge of the Middle Ages.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The principal nondramatic genres—lyric poetry, prose fiction, political theory, social commentary, religious devotion—of Elizabethan and Jacobean England, read in their social and cultural contexts.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Alongside theoretical considerations of the novel as a form of rewriting (Bakhtin, Bloom, Landow, et al.), students consider the effects of Caryl Phillips, Maryse Conde, Zadie Smith, Mario Vargas Llosa, Louisa Hall, Kamel Daoud, and others in rewriting Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Heights, Madam Bovary, The Scarlet Letter, Mrs. Dalloway, The Stranger, and other master narratives.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: LIT2450

Department: Literature

Literature from the songs of the troubadours and the rise of romance to the work of Dante is examined in connection with movements in European intellectual life and social history. Readings are in translation.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Spain and Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Films are discussed and analyzed in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the emergence of national identity as represented in South Asian literature in the aftermath of colonialism. The class explores contemporary literary texts along with selected archival documents. Topics include nationalist literature, colonial discourse, and postcolonial fiction. Writers include Rukun Advani, Anita Desai, Mahasweta Devi, Amitav Ghosh, Arundhati Roy, and Salman Rushdie. Taught in English.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Considers the literature of the Italian Renaissance in connection with such movements as humanism and Neoplatonism. Readings include works by Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Castiglione, and Ariosto in translation, but work in the original language is encouraged when possible.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores the process of decolonization in the context of the emergence of India and Pakistan in South Asia and traces the origin of fundamentalism in this region. Students examine the impact that fundamentalism has on religious, regional, and class identity through the works of both literary and nonliterary writers (e.g., Gandhi, Nehru, Jinnah, Nandy, Adiga, Sidhwa, Desai).

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Study LGBTQ identities via novels, short fiction, and films, by queer-identified authors who interrogate heteropatriarchy within a postcolonial framework. Texts include Queer Africa (eds. Martin and Xaba), Leche by R. Zamora Linmark, Walking with Shadows by Jude Bidia, Fire (film by Deepa Mehta), Same-Sex Love in India (eds. Vanita and Kidwai), and Our Sister Killjoy by Ama Ata Aidoo.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

One of the greatest English writers and the central poetic influence in the language, Milton is read in the context of the classical literary, political, and religious traditions that he inherited, disputed, and transcended. Special focus is on the relationship of “prophesy” and mythmaking to the radical and dissenting imagination.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Focuses on one of modernism’s most innovative fiction writers, Franz Kafka of Prague (1884–1924). Students explore the relationship of Jewish to European-Christian culture in Kafka’s work, the literary sources and historical contexts of his allegories, and the influential concept of the “Kafkaesque.” The goal is to become familiar with the multiple interpretations generated from works like The Trial, The Castle, and Amerika.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Read the complete short stories of five Eastern European authors, including Dostoevsky’s “The Grand Inquisitor” chapter from The Brothers Karamazov and focus on historical and thematic influences that connect Tolstoy, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, and Kafka. Trace connections between Dostoevsky’s stories and stories by Gogol and Tolstoy as well as Chekov’s and Kafka’s debt to Dostoevskian psychology and paradox.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The coming of age of poetry in the Americas through the work of the great modernists: Wallace Stevens, Vicente Huidobro, Ezra Pound, Cesar Vallejo, T.S. Eliot, Octavio Paz, William Carlos Williams, and Pablo Neruda. Taught in English. Latin American poets may be read in translation or in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

What constitutes the genre of the novel and its various subgenres? Which historical contexts most shaped the novel’s development, and how? What was the novel’s role in culture and society? This course asks these questions about the 19th-century novel in the U.S. In addition to many of the novels from the period, students read various theoretical and historical considerations of the novel.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The novels of Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Eliot, and Hardy in the political, intellectual, social, and cultural context of Britain and its empire in the 19th century.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the emergence of the Romantic imagination, the concept of the subject or self, and the plural nature of Romantic discourse in Wollstonecraft, Austen, and Wordsworth, among others. Topics explored include the writers’ diverse concepts of creativity and originality, sense of their place in society, notions of political identity, and relation to British literary traditions.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Traces the evolution of Romanticism in the aftermath of the radical promise of the first generation of Romantic poets, through the prose writers who self-consciously documented their literary and cultural heritage, to the full flowering of such writers as Byron, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and Emily Brontë.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the continuities of themes and paradigms between the Romantic and Modern periods in British literature. Topics include literary form and its relation to historical and social change; Empire; gender and sexuality; and the romantic fragment and modernist fragmentation.The goal of this advanced course is to enable students to recognize the narrative of British literature by witnessing its transmission.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

From Adam and Eve to the present, numerous authors have written about love. In this course, students examine forms and expressions of both romantic and erotic love in Western literature, from the Bible and ancient Greeks to Bob Dylan. Writers studied include Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, Joyce, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Nabokov, in addition to love poems, recent American short stories, and more.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An advanced course examining the construction of India and other “Oriental” spaces in the British imagination during the first phase of imperialism in India (1757–1857). This period coincides with the Romantic movement in England; therefore, British Romanticism and also nonliterary writing in Britain during this period are considered in the context of Empire. Topics include otherness, difference, exoticism, transculturation, assimilation, and hybridity.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Victorian poetry against the backdrop of a rapidly changing world during a period that marked the high point of England’s global power. Writers include Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Arnold, and Hopkins.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines racial pride, racial origins, and urban blacks through an exploration of essays, poems, short stories, and novels by writers of the period (1915–1930). Authors include Langston Hughes, Arna Bontemps, Countee Cullen, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer, and Zora Neale Hurston. Emphasis is on students’ written analysis of in-class and outside readings.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of the “middle genre,” encompassing the novella and the short novel. Readings provide ample opportunity to sample works embodying the intensity of short fiction and some of the expanded characterization and plot development of the novel. Readings include works by several significant 19th- and 20th-century authors from many countries.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Metafictions “radically call attention to their status as fictions.” They are hardly new, despite their association with “postmodernity”—Cervantes’ Don Quixote is an example of early metafiction. This course focuses on contemporary texts in the global context: The Wind-up Bird Chronicle, Murakami; The Hakawati, Alameddine; My Name is Red, Pamuk; Underworld, Delillo. Considerable experience with literature is helpful.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A study of modern poetry with a focus on T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, and others.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Students consider world literature of the 20th century as it reflects and questions national and international boundaries, politics, religion, freedom, nationalism, sexuality, gender, and identity. Readings include a broad cross-section of contemporary writings by international authors to facilitate discussion of social norms and values and the diversity of global literary tradition.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The 1920s was a decade of promise and anxiety in the US. From shell-shocked soldiers to bootlegging millionaires, flappers to factory workers, expatriates to eugenicists, the Great Migration to the Great Depression, much was changing in Americans’ perceptions of their nation, themselves, and the “other.” This course explores these shifts through Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Eliot, Hurston, Yezierska, DuBois, and Lewis, among others.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Helping others to read and write better improves one’s own reading and writing dramatically. In this course, advanced students improve their own writing and gain tutoring experience by serving as peer tutors in first-year courses. Each student is attached to a College Writing section and serves as a peer mentor/tutor, attending classes and working closely with the instructor (approx. 2 to 4 hours weekly).

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of the style, production, and reception of Ulysses, one of the founding texts of modernist fiction. Students analyze the distinctive style of each chapter and examine the relationship of the book to political and cultural issues of the period and to other literary texts by Joyce and continental writers. Readings also include historical, cultural, and critical materials.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

In this advanced lecture, the first wave of Gothic novels from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th century is examined in relation to visual representations of issues that dominate Gothic discourse. Topics include horror, imprisonment, madness, gender, ghosts and vampires. Authors and artists studied include Austen, the Brontë sisters, Radcliffe, Collins, Blake, Fuseli, and Turner.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

How does embodiment reveal shifting notions of race, gender, sexuality, and ability? Students read performance theory and explore contemporary representations of bodies as sites of display, resistance, and re-construction in literature, performance, and everyday practices in transnational and intersectional contexts. Authors include Ntozake Shange, NourbeSe Philip, Jackie Sibblies Drury, Branden Jacob-Jenkins, and David Henry Hwang.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Detailed readings of the major essays, poetry, and journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson, the paradoxical central figure of American culture. The course addresses his powerful influence in literature, political ideology, rhetoric, religion, and popular arts.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Holocaust scholar Lawrence Langer asks, “To whom shall we entrust the custody of the public memory of the Holocaust?” This course examines eyewitness testimony produced either during or after the Holocaust. Students read works such authors as Elie Wiesel, Primo Levi, Kazik (Simha Rotem), Emanuel Ringelblum, Anne Frank, and Hanna Senesh, a true Jewish Joan of Arc.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Focuses on a variety of writings (memoirs, letters, fiction, poetry), theatre, and films depicting the Yiddish world of the Lower East Side, home to more than two million Eastern European Jewish immigrants between 1880 and 1920. Readings include selections from the work of a variety of authors, from Yiddish newspapers, films, and other cultural materials.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of the novels, short stories, and essays of Virginia Woolf.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

What is a realist novel? What does it do, how, and to what end? Students consider these issues by interrogating texts in their cultural contexts, exploring the authors’ critical writings, drawing links among novels, and analyzing their reception over time. Readings include works by William Dean Howells, Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, and Ann Petry.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Students’ primary focus is on the bizarre and distorted fictions of Poe. Readings also include Poe’s poetry, analogous stories by Hawthorne, works by Melville, poetry by Dickinson, and others, extending to James’ ‘Turn of the Screw’ and other late-19th-century writings.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores constructions and representations of childhood and adolescence in post–Civil War U.S. culture and fiction, focusing particularly on ideological linkages between nation and family and how these connections shape the experiences and writings of authors and educators across cultures. Readings may include works by Alger, Louisa May Alcott, Twain, Dewey, Adams, Riis, Yezierska, Fauset, Cisneros, and Rita Mae Brown.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

From hip-hop to Kerouac, jazz has influenced American culture through its improvisatory nature and capacious style. This course traces the jazz aesthetic (its early developments, definitions, and evolutions) across a range of novels, poems, and musical performances by writers and artists, including Toni Morrison, Amiri Baraka, Billie Holiday, Gayl Jones, Louis Armstrong, Ralph Ellison, Thelonious Monk, and James Baldwin.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores the plays in which Shakespeare most explicitly portrays, solicits, and theorizes the emotion wonder, including A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Timon of Athens, Macbeth, Pericles, The Winter’s Tale, Cymbeline, and The Tempest. Through a variety of theoretical lenses, students explore aesthetic and ethical questions concerning how and why Shakespeare capitalizes on wonder so differently at various moments throughout his career.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The development of U.S. poetry. The course examines its major figures (Dickinson and Whitman from the 19th century; Stevens, Frost, and Williams from the 20th century) and surveys the “minor” poets. Provides an overview of contemporary poetry, as well as much practice in the close reading of poetic texts.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Bringing post-1960s American extremities into focus and organized around units on the Beat Generation, race in the deep south, the Kennedy assassination, 9/11, and social class, this course includes texts such as Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl,” Flannery O’Connor’s stories, Philip Roth’s “American Pastoral”, Don DeLillo’s “Libra”, Mohsin Hamid’s “Reluctant Fundamentalist”, C.T. Boyle’s “The Harder They Come”, Tara Westover’s “Educated.”

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The major novels of Melville, as well as some of his poetry and several important shorter works of his fiction.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores the lives, works, and times of the Beat Generation authors, examining the literary and cultural landscape from which the Beats emerged and their profound effect on the nascent counterculture and on the music and literature of a generation of artists that followed.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An introduction to the contemporary novel and the art and practice of book reviewing. Students read exemplary novels (e.g., Cloud Atlas and Netherland); they read exemplary book critics (e.g., Zadie Smith and James Wood); and they write their own exemplary reviews of contemporary fiction. Writing assignments range from blog posts to newspaper-style reviews and magazine-style essays.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Modern and contemporary American poetry is studied with an emphasis on craft and the creative process. Poets include T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Robert Frost, and Sylvia Plath, among others. Attention is given to the imagery, structure, and sound patterns (or “music”) of the poems. Poetry writers are encouraged to enroll, and anyone interested in poetry is welcome.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Looking at the Western literary canon from outside, we will consider texts at the margins (national, transnational and postcolonial) of the canon: contemporaneous texts which do not have the same literary success as well as those published later and meant as a critical response to the canon. Class is in English and texts will be taught in (English) translation.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines several texts written by American women, including works by Radstreet, Wheatley, Rowson, Stowe, Dickinson, Jewett, Cather, Wharton, Hurston, Bishop, and Naylor. The question of whether there is a traceable female tradition during the past 350 years is addressed. Readings include feminist literary criticism and theory.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of the novels of Jane Austen. Topics include gender and authorship; irony, sympathy, and point of view; the marriage plot; and filmic adaptation.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of short fiction as it emerged from the oral tradition of storytelling. Biblical tales and parables, Greek romance, saints’ lives, and the great story collections of medieval and early modern Europe are considered from a comparative perspective.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Concise and focused, the short story has been a lens through which Americans have explored their identities. Stories written in the last 25 years examine the changing sense of what being an American means.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Surrealist literature, films, and art in France, Spain, and Latin America. Artists include Aragon, Breton, Buñuel, Césaire, Char, Dali, Eluard, and Lorca. Works are read in translation and lectures given in English; students with French and/or Spanish are encouraged to read in the original language.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Major works of the most celebrated Latin American novelists, such as Cortàzar, García Márquez, Carpentier, and Guiraldes, emphasizing the cultural and social contexts from which these novels spring. Although this is a literature course taught in English, students with competent Spanish language skills are encouraged to read the works in the original and write their papers in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Novels, poems, and plays produced in the U.S. from World War II to the present. Focus is on the development of a postmodern aspect, and attention is concentrated on the flourishing literature of minority groups. Writers include Jack Kerouac, Thomas Pynchon, Louise Erdrich, Toni Morrison, Don DeLillo, Adrienne Rich, and Tony Kushner.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Centers on a close reading of Don Quixote, with attention to other works of Cervantes and to his importance to European narrative as a whole.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

The notion of the “new” in poetry and art is examined. Students read a range of poetry written in the late 19th century through the 1940s in France, Germany, Spain, Latin America, and the U.S., and explore ways in which expressive novelty is linked to particular cultural and social situations. Along with the poems and some visual art, some contemporary texts that advance theories of the “avant-garde” are considered.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An in-depth examination of the life and work of Flannery O’Connor, with a consideration of how later writers like Denis Johnson, Toni Morrison, and Kelly Link respond to her legacy.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explores how the emotions dread, sadness, and grief are theorized, represented, and solicited by works of literature written in England between 1000 and 1750. Primary readings include “The Wanderer,” Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess, Pearl, Hoccleve’s Complaint, More’s The Sadness of Christ, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy, and Gray’s Elegy Written in a County Churchyard.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Explore representations of monstrosity in a variety of early British literature in order to unearth the social anxieties (about gender, class, race, and religion) that animate them. Readings include Beowulf, the Lais of Marie de France, Chaucer’s Prioress’ Tale and Clerk’s Tale, Mandeville’s Travels, Marlowe’s The Jew of Malta, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and Milton’s Paradise Lost.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

An examination of the development of the British poetic canon in its literary and historical context. The development of lyric poetry is discussed in the context of changing reading practices and uses of literacy, and the multiple relations between literary artistry and the social world.

Credits: 3

Department: Literature

Considers seven novels that represent “modernity” as social, ethical, and/or individual crisis. The course explores overlapping modernist prose styles from romanticism to surrealism and concludes with a “postmodern” novel.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines Hurston’s novels, short stories, plays, and essays alongside archival recordings and visual media. Discussions cover Hurston’s influential role in shaping conversations around race, class, and gender in the 20th century and her impact on other writers, including Langston Hughes, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Magic and mythology meet modernity in this unique form of postcolonial narrative critique. What happens when the old gods reemerge in our hyper-rational globalized world? Students read works by Gabriel García Márquez, Isabel Allende, Amos Tutuola, and Salman Rushdie.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Examines the central role of war in Western literature, with a concentration on English and American texts.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A close reading of the Divine Comedy in the dual context of late medieval Italy and contemporary theoretical inquiry.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

William Carlos Williams and William Faulkner were both deeply engaged with the historical myths of their time and place, and both were central influences in the evolution of American modernism. Readings concentrate on major novels by Faulkner and poetry by Williams.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A survey of science fiction in literature and film, with particular focus on the genre’s ability to investigate large-scale social, political, philosophical, and narratological questions. Works by Philip K. Dick, Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia Butler, and China Miéville, among others.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

A culminating course that draws together the work of the major and prepares students for and complements the senior project. Each course section addresses its own topic; in every section, readings include primary texts, secondary texts that illuminate the primary texts, and works that define the discipline of literature or its interdisciplinary extensions, including theory and cultural studies.

Credits: 4

Department: Literature

Advanced study of one Shakespeare play that will be mounted in the spring by the acting program. Focuses on the performative, historical, and critical context of the play and provides an in-depth unders