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LEG 1510: Introduction to Criminal Law

Topics include the structure of the criminal justice system; the impact of the Supreme Court on criminal justice; and the process of arrest, prosecution, and sentencing.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 1520: Introduction to Civil Law

An exploration of the day-to-day applications of civil law: who can sue and be sued, the basis for lawsuits, and how to win cases. Through case studies and mock litigation, students explore such issues as product liability, medical malpractice, negligence, strict liability, and legal procedure, including document production and the use of expert witnesses.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3000: The Supreme Court and Civil Liberties

Focuses on major Supreme Court decisions pertaining to civil liberties. Cases dealing with the broad issue of privacy are examined, including those concerned with free speech, reproduction, and sexual preference. Students gain a better understanding of the current state of the law on major civil liberties issues and a better grasp of how Supreme Court decisions affect everyday life.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3010: Anatomy of a Trial and the Jury Process

Topics include the mechanism of the U.S. jury system; the truth-seeking process of juries; the concepts of mistrials, jury nullification, and hung juries; and a consideration of whether trial by jury is the best method for attaining justice. Students participate in a week-by-week mock trial, permitting hands-on experience in jury selection, opening statements, cross-examination, and summation.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3020: Law and the Family

The law touches everyone from conception to the grave and beyond. Family interactions between spouses, parents, children, and elders are dictated by rights and duties defined in the law. This course explores how the law weaves in and out of family structures in an attempt to protect and preserve certain rights and values.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3025: Environmental Law

U.S. environmental law and policy, the common-law foundations of environmental law, and the regulatory process and toolkit are examined. The focus is on major environmental statutes: the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, the Compensation and Recovery Act (Superfund), and the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3060: White-Collar Crime

White-collar criminality, the law of economic crime, and political crimes associated with white-collar crime are investigated through the lens of class and privilege. Students compare traditional and white-collar crimes, including organized crime, and associated prosecutions such as conspiracy, mail fraud, racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations (RICO), money laundering, corporate criminal liability, and fraud upon financial institutions and against the government.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3065: Legal Research

Students learn how to research the law and assess both its impact and effectiveness through research projects on the impact of law in a range of areas (e.g., consumer rights; the rights of women, students, minorities, and aliens; the rights of both the accused and the victims of crime).

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3070: Gender and the Law

Focuses on the evolution of the law in regard to gender-related issues, including sexual harassment in the workplace, gender discrimination in employment, and reproductive rights. Readings include key Supreme Court cases that have shaped the law concerning gender. A background in law is not required.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3080: Capital Punishment in America

An examination of the historical, moral, and legal issues surrounding the death penalty. Students confront the major controversial issues in the current death penalty debate and learn to form arguments from both the pro– and anti–death penalty perspectives. Topics include retribution, deterrence, proportionality, discrimination, error, and public opinion. Students analyze Supreme Court decisions and scholarly treatments of capital punishment.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3185: The Nature and Function of Law

The study of law from a liberal arts perspective, emphasizing the role that law and the legal order play in the institutional arrangements and human relations of a society. The course examines the basic concepts, language, institutions, and forms of law that characterize the American legal order.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3200: Communications Law

Explores the American legal system and examines the role of each branch of government—executive, legislative, and judicial—in shaping the laws that govern the right to free speech and the right to privacy, along with conflicts between those two rights that arise in the media, the private sector, and public institutions.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3300: Current Social Issues and the Law

Focuses on current legal issues such as abortion, the death penalty, and affirmative action. The pivotal Supreme Court cases establishing the law in each area are read. In addition, research in sociology and psychology is examined to understand the conditions that led to the key court decisions and the impact of those decisions on society.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3390: Immigration Law

Issues related to immigration law are placed in context by reviewing their historical evolution. Students examine current law and issues related to family and labor-based petitions for permanent residence, political asylum and refugee applications, the status of undocumented workers, immigration and national security, and deportation policies and procedures.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3420: Law, Order, and Disobedience

Protection of civil rights in the U.S. has been characterized by both civil disobedience and widespread violence. This course analyzes milestones in American history, periods of unrest, and the sociolegal changes associated with them. Landmark constitutional cases, law, and justice in U.S. culture are studied, and historical lawbreakers and high-profile dissidents are examined through various media.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
LEG 3480: Censorship: Sociological and Legal Perspectives

Sociologists have long understood that the study of censorship can yield an understanding of the structure and values of a society. Modern societies define and enforce limits on expression by defining certain forms of expression as obscene, pornographic, subversive, etc. Censorship in film, literature, and theatre is the major focus.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies