ARH 3335: Latin American Art in the Age of Globalization

Focuses on contemporary Latin American artists working in and out of Latin America: Gabriel Orozco, Guillermo Gomez Peña, Adriana Varejao, Teresa Margolles, Carlos Garaicoa, Betsabeé Romero, Javier Tellez, Nadín Ospina, Tania Bruguera, and Nicolás de Jesus. Students analyze the way these artists address such questions as urban violence, social inequality, pollution, emigration, and national identity.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
ARH 3815: Mexican Art From the Revolution to the NAFTA Era

A broad look at modern and contemporary Mexican art, using an interdisciplinary and comparative approach. Special emphasis is on the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) and its aftermath throughout the 20th century. Students analyze links between the visual arts (including mural painting, prints, and photography) and the literature, the popular scene and the mainstream, the street art and the gallery art.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
ARH 4590: Pre-Columbian Aesthetics in Modern Latin American Art

Since the late 1800s, pre-Columbian art and history have inspired Latin American artists. This course investigates that phenomenon through an in-depth study of the work of individual artists, including Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, as well as more contemporary figures. Students are also introduced to pre-Columbian art and architecture.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
CIN 3000: Cinema and Revolution

Third cinema was a movement proposed by Latin American directors in the 1960s and further developed by African directors in the 1970s. It addresses important questions about independent national cinemas, colonialism, race, and identity. This course examines the movement and its global influence, with emphasis on the cinemas of Latin America, Africa, black Britain, and American minorities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Latin American Studies
CIN 3080: Mexican Cinema

A survey of the history of Mexican cinema from the early 1930s to the present. Students examine popular genres like la comedia ranchera (Mexican cowboy musical), el género cabaretil (dancehall film), and el cine de luchadores (wrestling film) as well as the work of the most prominent Mexican filmmakers (e.g., Arturo Ripstein, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, Nicolás Echeverría, María Novaro, Guillermo del Toro).

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
CIN 3245: Latin American Cinema

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Students discuss and analyze films in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: (CIN1500 And CIN1510 ) Or (CIN2760 And CIN2770 )

Department: Latin American Studies
ECO 2223: Economies of Latin America

An overview of economic conditions in Latin America and the Caribbean, with a focus on competing strategies for national and regional development. Topics include the consequences of the region’s deepening immersion in the global economy; its investment, trade, and labor-market ties to the U.S. economy; and the roots of its principal socioeconomic conflicts.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
ENV 3420: Tropical Ecosystems

A field-based course in Costa Rica, surveying the diversity of tropical ecosystems and the challenges of balancing development and conservation. Students visit rainforest, dry forest, cloud forest, marsh, paramo, and agroecosystems, including coffee and banana plantations. The history and current state of conservation in the country are addressed in discussions with Costa Rican park guards, farmers, and foresters. Limited to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with a GPA above 2.5. Must be in good enough physical condition to hike 1–2 hours with a backpack.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ENV1500 Or BIO1560 Or BBI1560

Department: Latin American Studies
FRE 3067: French Caribbean Literature

A study of major developments in French Caribbean literature of the 19th through 21st centuries. This course focuses on questions of language, race, gender, geography, and class, with emphasis on local, regional, and global frames of reference.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 1600: Introduction to Latin American Studies

An introductory survey of the history of Latin America from colonial times to the present. Topics include geography, indigenous peoples, colonization and nation formation, society, politics, economy and culture of contemporary Latin America, and its place in today’s world.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 2005: Modern Latin America

Explores major social, cultural, economic, and political developments in Latin America from the period following the Wars of Independence to the present. The historical roots of such problems as racism, persistent poverty, and political repression are examined, focusing on “subaltern” groups (e.g., peasants, workers, women, and people of color).

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 2170: Colonial Latin America

An introductory survey of the history of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonization of the Americas from 1450 to 1810, i.e., from the late preconquest period to the Latin American struggle for independence. Lectures, readings, and discussions provide an overview of the economic, political, social, and cultural dimensions of colonization.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 2215: Latinos and Cities in the Americas

Focuses on the history of Latinos in urban centers across the U.S. and Latin America. Students explore how Latinos established and maintained distinctive social and cultural identities in the Americas. The historical definition of “Latinidad” is also discussed through the study of colonization, immigration, diaspora, globalization, and the history of the racialization of Latin American descendants.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 2540: Society and Culture in Modern Brazil

Covers the history of Brazil from independence to the present. During this period, Brazil has transformed from a colonial, agrarian, slave society to a predominantly urban, industrialized nation and an aspiring world power. Students explore slavery, racism, urban life, immigration and industrialization, changing gender roles, political repression and military rule, carnaval and popular culture.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3005: Representations of Latinos and Latinas in American Film, 1930–2000

Cinematic representations of Latinos and Latinas are explored as crucial elements in the configuration of “America” as a national community, taking into account key historical moments in the relationship between the United States and Latin America.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3085: Cities and Citizenship in the Americas

Focuses on the relationship between cities, urban life, and form, and the construction of social and political rights in the Americas. The emphasis is on how cities and citizenship are mutually constituted historically, looking at ideas and policies that regulate the city, and how urbanites produce and consume urban space and claim their rights as citizens and urban residents.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3395: Nation and Revolution in Latin America

Introduces students to cultural and political history in Latin America from the end of World War I to the Sandinista Revolution in 1979. Focusing on the role of intellectuals, students explore debates on nationalism, immigration, culture, modernization, and development in the context of the consolidation of new Latin American states, the Alliance for Progress, the Chinese and Cuban Revolutions, and the student and guerrilla movements.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3555: African Diasporas in the Americas

While many African-descended peoples throughout the world identify with a particular nationality—being Brazilian or Cuban, for example—many have also forged connections with each other across national boundaries and have recognized commonalities that transcend national contexts. To comprehend their shared experiences, students explore the history of the linkages created by Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-North Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries, using fiction, memoir, and recent historical scholarship.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3625: Slaves and Enslavement in the Americas

Examines processes of enslavement and emancipation in the Americas, with particular attention to Brazil and the Caribbean. Emphasis is on the everyday aspects of life in slave societies, the cultural history of the African diaspora, and slavery as a “political” question, broadly defined. Students also explore the implications of slavery for subsequent labor systems and race relations in the Atlantic world.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3685: Sex and Gender in Latin America

Examines the new historiography on gender and sexuality in Latin America. It is organized around the themes of changing gender roles and shifting constructions of masculinity, femininity, and honor, with particular attention to issues of sexuality, sexual preferences, constraints, and transgressions.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
HIS 3855: Oral History Workshop

Develops students’ interviewing and interpretive skills in the field of oral history. Students learn the theory and methodology and work on a final research project that seeks to bring forward the voices of those frequently excluded from more typical historical sources. Students also learn to produce archival quality interviews, and the final project includes some form of public presentation.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
LIT 3685: Modern Novel of Latin America

Major works of the most celebrated Latin American novelists, such as Cortàzar, García Márquez, Carpentier, and Guiraldes, emphasizing the cultural and social contexts from which these novels spring. Although this is a literature course taught in English, students with competent Spanish language skills are encouraged to read the works in the original and write their papers in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
LST 3050: Experiential Learning in Latin American Studies

Students select from an array of experiential options in Latin American studies in consultation with their Latin American studies advisor. Options include service learning, independent study, study abroad, and Project Focus.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
POL 3130: Immigration: Policies, Problems, and Politics

The United States prides itself on being a nation of immigrants, but has never made it easy for the newly arrived. This course examines the policies, problems, and politics affecting immigration to the U.S. today. Topics include causes of immigration, immigration law and the undocumented, and patterns of assimilation.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
POL 3300: Development and Politics of Latin America

An overview of major political structures, problems, and ideologies, concentrating particularly on South America. The first half of the semester discusses problems of land tenure, industrialization, and urbanization. The second half examines contemporary politics in detail, using one South American country as a case study.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
POL 3307: Politics and Memoir

A study of memoirs by male and female authors, politicians, activists, and ordinary citizens describing childhood, communities, social changes, and revolutions. Works are drawn from South Africa, South America, Asia, Cuba, and the U.S. The rubric is the non-West’s interaction with the West, a north-south divide.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
POL 3340: United States/Latin American Relations

It is difficult to understand the culture and politics of Latin America, in particular the Caribbean basin, without examining the role of the U.S. While the U.S. has generally seen its role in Latin America as that of a protector, many Latin Americans have perceived the U.S. as a heavy-handed superpower. The first half of the course provides a historical overview of U.S. interests and interventions, and how these have shaped Latin American societies. The second half examines contemporary problems and issues.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
POL 3361: Cuba, Latin America, and the U.S.

The course revolves around the international political and economic dynamics that have existed historically between the U.S. and Cuba. Although the course emphasizes the post-1959 era (the Castro years), readings introduce students to the imperial relationship that evolved in the early 20th century. Topics include foreign policy, war, human rights, the U.S. embargo, and the politics of Fidel Castro.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
POL 3570: Human Rights

Although human rights have become a significant theme in international relations, ethnic slaughter and political repression continue to afflict the world. This course examines relevant theoretical issues and practical problems, including: How are human rights viewed from different cultural, political, and religious perspectives? In a multicultural world, can common ground be found to address human rights? What is the relationship between sovereignty and the pursuit of human rights?

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
SOC 1030: Cultural Activism in Latin America

What does Latin American hip-hop have to do with social change? How do murga dances in Argentina and Uruguay or “theatre of the oppressed” performances in Brazil challenge “social authoritarianism”? Why are Greenpeace campaigns so successful in raising awareness about the Amazon? Why are carnivals in Oruro, Bolivia, or in Santiago del Estero, Argentina, still so lively and engaging? This course explores the relationship between activism and “culture” in different Latin American countries.

Credits: 3

Department: Latin American Studies
SOC 3056: Global Social Movements

How do groups mobilize to act for social change and against injustice? This course focuses on contemporary movements that emerge within and outside the United States, e.g., in Latin America. Case studies focus on human rights, feminism, environmentalism, landless rural workers, indigenous peoples, and global justice movements, with a particular focus on how these movements emerge, (re)create their identities, and frame injustice. The class analyzes how 21st-century movements are both global and local.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SOC1500 Or CSO1500

Department: Latin American Studies
SOC 3661: Border Wars and Transnational Human Rights

An examination of the various causes and consequences of international migration on migrants, their sending communities, and their destination countries. Topics include immigration debates, the social structures and economic and social conditions that facilitate labor migration, undocumented migration, refugee migration and forced migration. New York is an amazing place to explore migration, providing firsthand knowledge about migrant communities.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SOC1500 Or CSO1500 Or ANT1500 Or CAN1500

Department: Latin American Studies
SOC 3725: Globalization, Culture, Social Change: Latin America

A global sociological examination of the contemporary debates and studies concerning the social organization of cultures that transcends national boundaries. This course examines the highly debated concept of globalization by studying transnational social organizations and the distinctive dynamics of global political economy and culture. Topics include colonialism and postcolonialism, social movements and social change, social inequality, labor, human rights, democracy, global capitalism, urbanization, and cultural identity.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SOC1500 Or CSO1500

Department: Latin American Studies
SPA 3211: Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Drawing from the rich cinematography of Spain and Latin America, this course focuses on the interaction between film and culture in Latin America. Films are discussed and analyzed in the context of sociopolitical events and aesthetic movements, with emphasis on the cultural perspective.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
SPA 3365: Languages and Cultures of Spanish-Speaking Countries

Students explore the various languages and cultures that exist in Spanish-speaking countries. In general terms, the course is structured in two blocks: (1) Iberian Peninsula, pre- and post-Indo-European invasion; and (2) Latin America, pre- and post-Spanish invasion.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
SPA 3370: Lettered Cities: The Literature of Latin American Cities

A study of the literature of 20th- and 21st-century Latin American cities, looking at the relationship between literary texts, urban societies, and architectural configurations. Students also investigate the historical role cities have in Latin American cultural production and the role of capital cities in the production of nationalisms. Taught in Spanish.Note: Students should have experience with courses in Spanish at the advanced level or above. Consult with the instructor if in doubt.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
SPA 3630: The Modern Latin American Novel

Major novels of 20th-century Latin America and their literary and social contexts. Authors include Guiraldes, Carpentier, Cortàzar, and García Márquez. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: SPA3015

Department: Latin American Studies
SPA 3687: The Idea of Latin America

Who had the idea to name part of the world “Latin America”? What makes it “Latin”? Who has an interest in this definition? Who is included and who isn’t? This course asks these questions and others through readings of texts by Bolívar, Martí, Mariátegui, and others.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
SPA 3700: The Latin American Short Story

Selected examples drawn from the significant number of Latin American writers who have made some of their most interesting contributions in this short form. Selected works from 19th- and 20th-century writers are read closely. Taught in Spanish.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies
THP 3650: Contemporary U.S. Latino Theatre

Engaging with a wide variety of plays and performances, students explore U.S. Latino theatre as a site of personal, cultural, and political intervention. Readings reflect the aesthetics, narratives, historical contexts, and systems of theatrical production pertinent to Latino culture in the U.S.

Credits: 4

Department: Latin American Studies