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Undergraduate Courses with Noncredit Seats

Take an undergraduate credit-bearing course on a noncredit basis at a reduced tuition rate! 

Costs

  • $180 for the noncredit option in a 1-credit course*
  • $260 for the noncredit option in a 1.5-credit course*
  • $320 for the noncredit option in a 2-credit course*
  • $520 for the noncredit option in a 3-credit course*
  • $625 for the noncredit option in a 4-credit course*

*plus applicable fees. In addition to the tuition and any listed lab fees, there is a $25 nonrefundable noncredit registration fee paid once per semester. Please note: Specialized course tuition rates may vary from the above.

More Information

  • Students who register for this option do not receive college credit or grades.
  • This noncredit option is limited to students who are not enrolled in a degree program at Purchase College.
  • Because noncredit spaces are limited in these credit courses, early registration is advised.
  • Students may not switch between the credit and noncredit sections of these courses after the add/drop period.
  • Early registration discounts do not apply to these courses.

Summer 2022

Registration is open.

You can find more information in the online course search. Choose “Summer” 2022 Noncredit” and click on “Course Search.”

American Sign Language

ASL 1000

A comprehensive introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), beginning with a focus on the linguistic aspects of ASL, including syntax, facial expression, vocabulary, and the manual alphabet. Students progress to conversational signing and finger spelling and develop an ability to communicate on a beginning level.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Synchronous | noncredit | $625 Instructor: Christopher Reineck

Arts Management

AMG 1100

This introductory survey provides an overview of creative industries and management theory and principles common in both the nonprofit and commercial sectors, preparing students for upper-level courses in the arts management program. Topics include history of arts management, arts and creativity, leadership and management, business structures, programming, marketing, funding, finance and budgeting, arts advocacy, activism and social justice.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625 Instructor: Janis Astor

Biology

BIO 1510

Introduction to the organ systems of the human body, including the neuromuscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and digestive systems. The physiological mechanisms of adaptation to exercise are also considered.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Lecture | noncredit | $625   
Instructor: Natalia Starkova
Location: Natural Science building, rm 1030

View course on myHeliotrope

BIO 1520

Introduction to the human body, emphasizing general physiological processes. The body is studied from the viewpoint of homeostasis, concentrating on the relationship of food to the functioning living organism in health and disease. Topics of current interest, controversies, and myths are highlighted.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Lecture | noncredit | $625 
Instructor: TBA
Location: Natural Science building, rm 3010

BIO 1550

Introduction to contemporary biology, covering cell structure and function, genetics, development, and molecular biology. This course is for science majors and premedical students; students with limited high school science and mathematics can satisfy college distribution requirements with BIO 1510 or 1520.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Lecture | noncredit | $625 
Instructor: Natalia Starkova

View course on myHeliotrope .

BIO 1560

Second semester of an introduction to contemporary biology, covering plant and animal morphology and physiology, ecology, behavior, and evolution. This course is for science majors and premedical students; students with limited high school science and mathematics can satisfy college distribution requirements with BIO 1510 or 1520.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Lecture | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Natalia Starkova

Chemistry

CHE 1550

The principles and applications of chemistry. Topics include the development of an atomic/molecular model, stoichiometry, interaction of light with matter, and the physical behavior of solids, liquids, and gases.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Lecture | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Josh Sabatini

View course on myHeliotrope.

CHE 1560

A continuation of CHE 1550. Topics include chemical kinetics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, acids and bases, and the chemistry of representative elements.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Lecture | noncredit | $625 
Instructor: Laurence Weisberg

View course on myHeliotrope

Cinema and Media Studies

CMS 3210

Throughout the history of cinema, the comedy film has been one of the most financially profitable genres, producing some of the biggest movie stars. Topics include various comedy film styles and performers, and the role of the comedy film genre within the context of world history, especially during darker periods like the Depression and World War II.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625 | Instructor: Samantha Marine

CMS 3290

Examines the elements and messages in sports films that make people cheer for the underdog and care about teams, players, and sports. Using both big-budget Hollywood films and documentaries with a small scope, this course explores the ideas of team, sport, and athletics and investigates the grip that sports have on American culture.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Brian Paccione

View course on myHeliotrope

MSA 3020

In 1991, The Real World pioneered a genre of “unscripted” television that reshaped national media culture, culminating in the reality of the 2016 election. Students study theories of Hall, Habermas and Gramsci to explore how the genre reflects and shapes attitudes of U.S. audiences to surveillance, class conflict, and the performance of truths. Examples include Jersey Shore and American Idol.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Adam Resnick

View course on myHeliotrope.

MSA  4750

Investigates the relation between violence and the senses. Thinks through how our culturally patterned modes of perception can inherently carry traces of violence (e.g. ocular aggression) or be weaponized. Draws on ethnography and anthropology, cultural, and media studies, to explore the relation between violence (broadly conceived), racialization, the gaze and looking, and regimes of perception.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Combined | noncredit | $625| Instructor: Andrés Romero

View course on myHeliotrope.

College Writing

WRI1110 - College Writing

The ability to express ideas clearly and effectively in writing is essential to success as a student and citizen. Students learn and practice these skills throughout their academic career at Purchase College, beginning with College Writing. This is an intensive course that teaches students to:

  • produce strong written work at the college level
  • read and think critically
  • take a position and develop an argument of their own
  • research a topic and write a well-organized paper that develops their claims in dialogue with the sources
  • revise and improve their papers
    present their ideas orally

NEW this summer! In this special section of College Writing, with a focus on popular culture and public art, unique to the Purchase College, you will experience hands-on writing at the Neuberger Museum, as well as writing in different genres .

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Synchronous | 4 credits | Core: Basic Communication |Instructor: Alysa Hantgan

View course on myHeliotrope

Communications

COM 1500

The history and impact of communication technologies are examined, beginning with speech and moving forward through print and digital media, advertising and public relations, media regulation and potential, and ending with a consideration of the future.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625 Instructor: Allison Kahn

View course on myHeliotrope.

COM 3710

Television is much more than a passive, incessant means of diversion—it is a powerful environment of ideas, emotions, and values that influences people’s thoughts, actions, and relationships. Students become acquainted with current issues concerning television in society and explore the impact of television on society. Aspects examined include the 1950s and mass culture, viewer response, serial/episodic structure, and the rise of cable.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Sharon Zechowski

View course on myHeliotrope.

Environmental Studies

ENV 2050

Students explore the source, fate and effect of contaminants on wildlife, along with what we can do to help through education, science and policy. Through the pairing of introductory ecotoxicological concepts with key case studies, this course spans political, scientific, and public relations realms and teaches the importance of being good global stewards of the environment.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625  Instructor: Allyson Jackson

View course on myHeliotrope.

ENV 3030

The environment has become increasingly significant in national and international politics. This course examines the key concepts, players, and issues in environmental policy. Students evaluate the contributions by scientific, political, economic, and social systems to the generation of environmental policy. Environmental topics include population growth, natural resource use, global climate change and energy, endangered species protection, and pollution.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Ryan Taylor

View course on myHeliotrope.

ENV 3163

Satellites, aircraft, and drones provide safe access to remote, rugged, and otherwise restricted locations. Applications utilizing SONAR, LIDAR, hyperspectral scanning and photogrammetry are used with these craft to create long-term global datasets of natural and cultural features. Using online Geographic Information System platforms students learn the skills to interpret these data, conduct their own analyses, and collaborate with other researchers.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Ryan Taylor

View course on myHeliotrope

History

HIS 3165

Examines how war changed gender relations in 20th-century Europe. For instance, how did mobilization reinforce or undermine masculine and feminine norms? How did total wars that blurred the line between fighting front and home front challenge notions of chivalry and turn noncombatants into warriors of sorts? Did new job opportunities outweigh the trauma and grief suffered by women during wartime?

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: John Bailey

View course on myHeliotrope.

Legal Studies

LEG 3000

Focuses on major Supreme Court decisions pertaining to civil liberties. Caselaw examined includes: privacy, free expression, free exercise of religion, reproductive rights, and same-sex marriage. Students gain a deeper understanding of the current state of the law on major civil liberties issues and a grasp on how Supreme Court decisions affect everyday life.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Kristyan Gilmore

View course on myHeliotrope

Liberal Studies

LBS 3012

An interdisciplinary course that examines physical aspects of the world’s water, from oceans and rivers to streams and ponds. Noting the role that water plays in ecosystems and social systems provides the basis for further exploration into the history of use, contamination, and protection. The physical and chemical properties of water provide the basis for questions of safety and sustainability.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Ryan Andrews

View course on myHeliotrope.

LBS 3028

How we treat animals reveals a great deal about who we are, as a society and species. This course examines intersections between animals, humans and society from multiple perspectives (ecology, history, sociology, literature). Using text, media, documentaries and photojournalism, students explore contemporary topics, including animal intelligence and emotions, biodiversity and keystone species, animals in captivity, and zoonotic disease (i.e., Coronavirus).

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online  Asynchronous) | noncredit | $625|\
Instructor: Lisa Jean Moore

View course on myHeliotrope.

 

Literature

LIT 2235

Readings explore postcolonial and other contemporary global literary representations of animals and the environment, specifically their engagement with narratives of colonization and development, human-centeredness, and the posthuman. Students will consider how these representations invite readers to re-think hierarchical and human-centered visions of our world.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Kerry Manzo

View course on myHeliotrope.

LIT 3677

Concise and focused, the short story has been a lens through which Americans have explored their identities. Stories written in the last 25 years examine the changing sense of what being an American means.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Shinelle Espaillat

View course on myHeliotrope.

Mathematics

MAT 1060

Students learn basic concepts in quantitative reasoning (number systems, data manipulation, basic statistics), with emphasis on problem solving using computational methods. This course uses a textbook and focuses on applications related to consumer issues to develop computational and problem-solving skills. Students learn to transform data into information and apply quantitative methods to evaluate information and solve real-world problems.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Barbara McMullen

View course on myHeliotrope.View course on myHeliotrope.

MAT 1150

Prepares students with limited backgrounds in high school mathematics for calculus. Topics include absolute values and inequalities, the properties of functions, graphs, logarithms, fractional exponents, and trigonometry.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Nicholas Roberts

View course on myHeliotrope.

MAT 1500

The basic concepts of the differential and integral calculus. Focus is on the applicability of these topics to an array of problems. The first course in a three-semester series.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Combined (Synchronous + Asynchronous) | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Alan Anderson

View course on myHeliotrope.

MAT 1510

A continuation of MAT 1500. Topics include differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions; techniques of integration; arc length; infinite series; and improper integrals. Applications include work, growth, and decay problems and volumes of solids of revolution.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Nicholas Roberts

View course on myHeliotrope.

MAT 1600

Statistics are used everywhere in the modern world. This course covers descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, methods of dispersion, and graphs; and inferential statistics, including normal distributions and hypothesis testing, Pearson correlation, and linear regression.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Barbara McMullen

View course on myHeliotrope.

Musical Theatre

THP 3340

Come taste the finest sampling of the great Broadway songwriters. Each class examines a particular songwriter (Cole Porter, Stephen Sondheim), idea (the subversives: Weill and Bernstein), or era (contemporary voices on Broadway). Students savor recordings, investigate the dramatic qualities of the songs, and analyze lyrics, melody, and song form.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Combined (Synchronous + Asynchronous) | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Michael Garber

View course on myHeliotrope.

Photography

PHO 1101

An introduction to the techniques, current practices, and history surrounding digital photography. Editing techniques are covered, with attention to image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop and RAW files. Composition, lighting, point of view, and use of narrative are explored. A digital camera is required; cameras may be borrowed, as available, from Campus Technology Services. Students may not earn credit for both PHO 1100 (offered by the School of Art+Design) and PHO 1101.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $520
Instructor: Deborah Mesa-Pelly

View course on myHeliotrope.

Psychology

PSY 1530

Empirical and theoretical approaches to the basic physiological, cognitive, and social mechanisms underlying behavior. Topics include learning and conditioning; sensation and perception; memory, thinking, and language; psychological development; social processes; and personality and psychopathology.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Lauren Harburger

View course on myHeliotrope.

PSY 2250

An examination of the biological processes by which the sensory systems pick up information from the environment and the psychological processes by which that information is coded, transformed, and integrated to form perceptions. Emphasis is on the visual systems and visual perception. Aspects of perception in the visual arts and music are also discussed.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Jason Clarke

View course on myHeliotrope.

PSY 2455

The interplay of cyberpsychology, gender, age, culture, and subculture are examined. Theoretical, empirical, and practical research issues are considered. Emphasis is placed on the impact of social media on mental health and psychological well-being. Individual, social, and community-level factors are discussed.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Synchronous | noncredit | $520
Instructor: Christopher Williams

View course on myHeliotrope.

PSY 3110

Students hone critical thinking and evaluative skills in examining data, evidence, and assumptions underlying the judicial process and the application of psychological principles. The research and clinical practice of forensic psychology in both civil and criminal law-enforcement settings are studied. The training, roles, and responsibilities of forensic psychologists along with methods of interrogation, criminal profiling, and investigation are also examined.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Jacqueline Fisher

View course on myHeliotrope.

PSY 3301

The interventions suggested by the biopsychosocial model and mind-body paradigm are examined. Topics include health behavior, social learning theory, attribution theory, and attitude formation as they apply to problems like health promotion, disease prevention, reactions to illness, management of chronic and terminal illnesses, and adherence to treatment regimens. Methods of evaluation of clinical services are addressed.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Jessica Carnevale

View course on myHeliotrope.

Screenwriting

PSW 1010

Introduces the student to writing a dramatic story for the screen, placing an emphasis on discovery, good work habits, critical assessment, and rewriting as essential to the professional writer. Through numerous assignments, students learn the basics of dramatic story structure, revealing character, writing dialogue, genre, and use of story suspense. All techniques are applied in a final short screenplay.

Session II: Monday, June 6 - Monday, August 1

Online Synchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Eric Mandelbaum

View course on myHeliotrope.

Sociology

SOC 3455

Conflict can signal either a disruption in an organization’s operations or an opportunity for change and growth. This course examines the causes, processes, costs, and benefits of social conflict, and methods for conflict resolution. Using sociological theory and research, the relationship of social issues to organizational and institutional conflict is also addressed. Students are given a broad perspective on making conflict an asset organizationally and interpersonally, including 25 hours of coursework needed for conflict-mediation certification. Provides the foundation for an apprenticeship with a conflict-mediation or dispute-resolution center.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Chrys Ingraham

View course on myHeliotrope

SOC 3415

Given the ethnic complexity of society, major social institutions—including education, criminal justice, health care, social services, and business—face many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and future of race and ethnicity in American society, and how immigration, culture, religion, education, and income play parts in prejudice, discrimination, and racial inequalities.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Chrys Ingraham

View course on myHeliotrope .

Spanish

SPA 1010

For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written Spanish by involving the student in situations that concretely represent the concepts of the language.

Session I: Monday, June 6 - Friday, July 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Ager Gondra

View course on myHeliotrope.

SPA 1020

A continuation of SPA 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. Development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Session III: Tuesday, July 5 - Monday, August 1

Online Asynchronous | noncredit | $625
Instructor: Ager Gondra

View course on myHeliotrope.