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Undergraduate Courses with Noncredit Seats

Take a noncredit course at a reduced tuition rate!

  • $180 for the noncredit option in a 1-credit course*
  • $260 for the noncredit option in a 1.5-credit course*
  • $320 for the noncredit option in a 2-credit course*
  • $520 for the noncredit option in a 3-credit course*
  • $625 for the noncredit option in a 4-credit course*

*plus applicable fees. In addition to the tuition and any listed lab fees, there is a $25 nonrefundable noncredit registration fee paid once per semester. Please note: Specialized course tuition rates may vary from the above.

  • Students who register for this option do not receive college credit or grades.
  • This noncredit option is limited to students who are not enrolled in a degree program at Purchase College.
  • Because noncredit spaces are limited in these credit courses, early registration is advised.
  • Students may not switch between the credit and noncredit sections of these courses after the add/drop period.
  • Early registration discounts do not apply to these courses.

Fall 2019

Registration begins Monday, July 15

You will see more info in the online course search. Choose “Fall 2019 Noncredit (View Only)” and click on “Class Search.”

Arts Management

Fundamentals of Arts Management (hybrid) —starts August 30

This introductory survey provides an overview of management principles and entities common in both the nonprofit and commercial sectors, preparing students for upper-level courses in the arts management program. Topics include arts business goals and planning, history of arts management, leadership and organizational structure, programming, marketing and public relations, funding and finance, volunteerism and advocacy, and arts and entertainment law.

AMG 1100 / noncredit / $625/hybrid: 50% online and 50% in person
Instructor:
Janis Astor
August 30—December 13, no class on Friday November 29
Friday, 10:30 am—12:10 pm 
Humanities Building, room 2044
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Fundamentals of Arts Management—starts August 28

This introductory survey provides an overview of management principles and entities common in both the nonprofit and commercial sectors, preparing students for upper-level courses in the arts management program. Topics include arts business goals and planning, history of arts management, leadership and organizational structure, programming, marketing and public relations, funding and finance, volunteerism and advocacy, and arts and entertainment law.

AMG 1100 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Dawn Gibson-Brehon
August 28—December 11
Wednesday, 8:00—11:40 am, no class on Wednesday November 27
Humanities Building, room 1039
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Fundamentals of Arts Management—starts August 29

This introductory survey provides an overview of management principles and entities common in both the nonprofit and commercial sectors, preparing students for upper-level courses in the arts management program. Topics include arts business goals and planning, history of arts management, leadership and organizational structure, programming, marketing and public relations, funding and finance, volunteerism and advocacy, and arts and entertainment law.

AMG 1100 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Lawrence Tamburri
August 29—December 12, no class on Thanksgiving Day
Thursday, 6:30—10:10 pm
Humanities Building, room 2056
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Finance for the Arts I—starts August 26

To do more than survive in a competitive economy, artists and their managers must learn business strategies for the financial side of their profession. Students are introduced to the basics of budgets, financial management, and accounting concepts that translate into usable information with practical significance for financial decision-making.

AMG 2200 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Lawrence Tamburri
August 26—December 9
Monday, 6:30—10:10 pm, no class on Labor Day
Humanities Building, room 1040
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Finance for the Arts I (hybrid) —starts August 30

To do more than survive in a competitive economy, artists and their managers must learn business strategies for the financial side of their profession. Students are introduced to the basics of budgets, financial management, and accounting concepts that translate into usable information with practical significance for financial decision-making.

AMG 2200 / noncredit / $625/hybrid: 50% online and 50% in person
Instructor:
 Katherine Ingram
August 30—December 13
Friday, 10:30 am—12:10 pm, no class on Friday November 29
Fort Awesome, room 137
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Communicating the Arts—starts August 27

The ability to communicate effectively is frequently ranked by business leaders worldwide as the most important skill for achieving success. This course develops the written, presentation, and interpersonal skills needed to advance career and business objectives in arts management. Assignments build familiarity and practice in internal and external communication tools and tactics common for informing, engaging, and influencing diverse stakeholders.

AMG 2300 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Cynthia Brosnan
August 27—December 10
Tuesday, 6:30—9:50 pm, no class on Election Day, November 5
Social Sciences Building, room 1003
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Communicating the Arts—starts August 29

The ability to communicate effectively is frequently ranked by business leaders worldwide as the most important skill for achieving success. This course develops the written, presentation, and interpersonal skills needed to advance career and business objectives in arts management. Assignments build familiarity and practice in internal and external communication tools and tactics common for informing, engaging, and influencing diverse stakeholders.

AMG 2300 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Cynthia Brosnan
August 29—December 5
Thursday, 2:30—5:10 pm, no class on Thanksgiving Day
Humanities Building, room 2053
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Communication

Spoken Word—starts October 16

The art of the spoken word is studied in many of its forms, including political speeches, story-based podcasts, and slam poetry. Students research and create concise stories; examine the role that rhythm, cadence, structure, and sound patterns play in creating a memorable performance; and then practice delivering the message for their intended audience. Uses and impacts for inspiring, informing, and persuading are considered.

COM 2000 / noncredit / $320
Instructor:
Janis Astor
October 16—December 11
Wednesday, 7:00—10:20 pm, no class on Wednesday November 27
Humanities Building, room 2044
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Going Global: Intercultural Communication—starts October 14

Introduces basic concepts of intercultural communication. By examining communication practices in diverse contexts (e.g., family, education, workplace, health, and recreation), students learn how cultural rules and norms are enacted and how violations are sanctioned. International factors, cross-cultural competence, and global citizenship are discussed with the goal of increasing understanding, enhancing each student’s ability to interact appropriately in the U.S. and abroad.

COM 2030 / noncredit / $320
Instructor:
Di Yu
October 14—December 9
Monday, 6:30—9:50 pm
Humanities Building, room 2031
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Journalism

Editing with Adobe Premiere Pro—starts August 27

An introduction to the essentials of digital video editing with Adobe Premiere Pro in an intensive hands-on training format. Students become familiar with the user interface and editing tools needed to produce professional-quality videos for home use, broadcast television, and the web.

JOU 1110 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
 Anna Ozbek
August 27—October 8
Tuesday, 8:30—10:50 am
Library, room 1015B
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Multidisciplinary

*CLOSED* Water—starts August 26

An interdisciplinary course that examines physical aspects of the world’s water, from oceans and rivers to streams and ponds. Noting the role that water plays in ecosystems and social systems provides the basis for further exploration into the history of use, contamination, and protection. The physical and chemical properties of water provide the basis for questions of safety and sustainability.

LBS 3012 / noncredit / $625/ hybrid: in person  class meetings supplemented with online component
Instructors:
Ryan Andrews + Sarah Sunde
August 26—December 9
Monday, 6:30—8:30 pm, no class on Labor Day
Humanities Building, room 2047
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

“CLOSED* Transportation—starts August 28

An interdisciplinary course that examines the way air, ground, and marine transportation is structured and used to move demographically diverse people. Discussions about the role of public participation in planning efforts includes particular attention to youth, minority populations, and people with low income. Programs to increase participation from people traditionally under-heard in planning processes are examined and proposed.

LBS 3010 / noncredit / $625/ hybrid: in person  class meetings supplemented with online component
Instructors:
Mara Horowitz + Austin Dooley
August 28—December 11
Wednesday, 7:00—9:00 pm, no class on November 27
Humanities Building, room 2047
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

*CLOSED* Diverse Abilities: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives—starts August 26

Explores the meanings and definitions of ability and disability. Students examine genealogies of ‘disability’ in the United States and cross-culturally from historical, legal, and sociocultural perspectives. Representations of disability in art history, museums, and theatre and film are critically analyzed in efforts to move toward diverse and inclusive understandings of human ability and universal design principles.

LBS 3018 / noncredit / $625
Instructors:
 Tim Dalton
August 26—December 9, no class on Labor Day
Monday, 2:30—6:10 pm
Natural Sciences Building, room 1001
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

*CLOSED* Migration: World on the Move—starts August 29

Provides a broad view of migration from multiple disciplinary perspectives, at multiple scales of analysis (local-global), and across geopolitical space. Explore how migration intersects with development, environment, security, and identity. A central concern includes how such sociopolitical considerations vis-a-vis migration, in turn, impact and fashion our sense of responsibility for the global commons.

LBS 3019 / noncredit / $625
Instructors:
Mara Horowitz  + Leandro Benmergui
August 29—December 12
Thursday, 6:30—9:50 pm, 
Humanities Building, room 2047
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Legal Studies

Anatomy of a Trial and the Jury Process—starts August 29

Topics include the mechanism of the U.S. jury system; the truth-seeking process of juries; the concepts of mistrials, jury nullification, and hung juries; and a consideration of whether trial by jury is the best method for attaining justice. Students participate in a week-by-week mock trial, permitting hands-on experience in jury selection, opening statements, cross-examination, and summation.

LEG 3010 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Linda Gironda
August 29—December 12
Thursday, 6:30—9:50 pm
Fort Awesome, room 0137
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Political Science

Human Rights and Literature—starts September 3

An exploration of various perspectives on human rights. Students examine some modern nation states in relation to geographies of identity and human rights. Global literature is read in colonial and postcolonial contexts that describe state control through the infringement of citizenship and rights of speech, thus violating basic human rights.

POL 3573 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
Michael Taub
September 3—December 10
Tuesday, 6:30—9:50 pm
Rockland extension site, room 1107
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Psychology

Religion and Psychology—starts September 5

In this study of psychology in relation to religion, students explore the definition of religion, its personal meaning to people, and its social and political meaning in the community. The importance of ritual is discussed, and conversion is examined to understand its meaning. The middle of the course focuses on such theorists as Freud, Jung, and Maslow and the role religion played in their theories. Finally, the role religion and culture play in psychotherapy and the difference between religions and cults are examined.

PSY 3140 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
George Keteku
September 5—December 19
Thursday, 6:30—9:50 pm, no class on Thanksgiving Day
Rockland extension site, room 1107
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization

Writing

True Stories: Craft of Memoir—starts September 4

Students learn how to examine and write their own stories through in-class exercises and discussion of both student and published work. Beginning writers, as well as those with a particular project in mind, learn how to place their stories in the larger context of the world and employ storytelling techniques, including imagery, voice, dialogue, and character development.

WRI 3250 / noncredit / $625
Instructor:
 Jonathan Craig
September 4—December 18
Wednesday, 6:30—9:50 pm
Rockland extension site, room 2325
Registration Form / Credit Card Authorization