Main content

Michael Lisbin

Lecturer in Biology

Michael Lisbin received his BA in biology from Boston University and his PhD in molecular and cellular biology from Brandeis University. His graduate research explored the function of a Drosophila RNA binding protein that promotes neural development throughout the fly’s life. His post graduate studies at Albert Einstein College of Medicine focused on the yeast splicing machinery and crystallization of proteins.

More About Me

Lisbin now lectures in many biology topics and is an amateur paleontologist, frequenting many Ordovician and Devonian fossil sites in upstate New York and Ontario. He also works as a consultant for a small biotech company developing educational biology experiments.

Courses taught:

Bio 155 General Biology Lecture and Lab

Bio 156 General Biology Lecture and Lab

Bio 151 Anatomy & Physiology

Publications

Kim J, Malashkevich V, Roday S, Lisbin MJ, Schramm VL, Almo SC. Structural and kinetic characterization of Escherichia coli TadA, the wobble-specific tRNA deaminase. Biochemistry. 2006 May 23;45(20):6407-16.

Lisbin MJ, Qiu J, White K. The neuron-specific RNA-binding protein ELAV regulates neuroglian alternative splicing in neurons and binds directly to its pre-mRNA. Genes and Development. 2001 Oct 1;15(19):2546-61.

Lisbin MJ, Gordon M, Yannoni YM, White K. Function of RRM domains of Drosophila melanogaster ELAV: Rnp1 mutations and rrm domain replacements with ELAV family proteins and SXL. Genetics. 2000 Aug;155(4):1789-98.

Koushika SP, Lisbin MJ, White K. ELAV, a Drosophila neuron-specific protein, mediates the generation of an alternatively spliced neural protein isoform. Current Biology. 1996 Dec 1;6(12):1634-41.

Samson ML, Lisbin MJ, White K. Two distinct temperature-sensitive alleles at the elav locus of Drosophila are suppressed nonsense mutations of the same tryptophan codon. Genetics. 1995 Nov;141(3):1101-11.

Nadler SG, Merrill BM, Roberts WJ, Keating KM, Lisbin MJ, Barnett SF, Wilson SH, Williams KR. Interactions of the A1 heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein and its proteolytic derivative, UP1, with RNA and DNA: evidence for multiple RNA binding domains and salt-dependent binding mode transitions. Biochemistry. 1991 Mar 19;30(11):2968-76.