The Liberal Studies Program: Social Sciences Courses

Note: It is expected that each course will be offered at least once during 2016–17 or 2017–18.

Anthropology
Business
Communications
Gender Studies
Legal Studies
Political Science
Social Sciences: General
Sociology

Anthropology Courses

Women Cross-Culturally
ANT 3140
/ 4 credits
An examination of some of the theoretical literature about gender and the debates concerning the position of women cross-culturally in both “simple” and complex societies.

Middle Eastern Cultures: Texts and Films
ANT 3330
/ 4 credits
Explores the various cultures, geography, and history of the Middle East, including Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Some time is also devoted to minorities within a larger context. The selected texts and films raise awareness of human rights issues as well as the political, ethnic, and national complexities of the region. Both fiction and nonfiction works are used.

Masculinities: Feminist Perspectives
SOC 3705
Refer to Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Business Courses

Organizational Leadership
BUS 3000
/ 4 credits
Effective, vibrant leadership is essential to the success of any organization. This interdisciplinary course is designed to increase students’ understanding of major leadership behavioral patterns, personal leadership skills, and analysis in for-profit, nonprofit, community, and governmental organizations. Contemporary issues in leadership are addressed in the context of established leadership theory.

Business Ethics
BUS 3090
/ 4 credits
Students learn how to integrate ethics with business practices by examining case studies and theories. Confronting ethical dilemmas in the workplace is an experience that affects individuals, organizations, communities, and the environment. Civic- and social-responsibility practices and policies are examined, demonstrating how integrity and moral sensibility can be a part of everyday professional and civic decision-making.

Communications Courses

Introduction to Mass Media and Communications
CMS 1500
/ 4 credits
The history and impact of communication technologies are examined, beginning with speech and moving forward through print and digital media, advertising and public relations, media regulation and potential, and ending with a consideration of the future.

Public Speaking
CMS 2000
/ 4 credits
Students develop expertise in public speaking by preparing and presenting different types of speeches for a variety of purposes. The focus is on the main elements of planning and delivering a speech: the message, the speaker, the audience, and the occasion. All speeches are critiqued in class. As an integral part of the course, students learn PowerPoint.

America at the Movies
CMS 3010
/ 4 credits
Selected films are analyzed to illuminate significant aspects of American society in the 1970s and 1980s, including the war in Vietnam and expansion of American power, the end of legal racial segregation, the movements for women’s equality and gay rights, and challenges to traditional conventions (the sexual revolution, counterculture movement, and youth movement). How did these developments affect life in America in the following decades, and how did Hollywood confront their political reverberations?

Law, Ethics, and the Media
CMS 3020
/ 4 credits
The First Amendment allows the mass media certain freedoms to publish, broadcast, advertise, and promote. Yet with those rights come responsibilities. This course examines the legal and ethical dimensions and issues involved with contemporary American mass media.

Mass Media: A Cultural History
CMS 3040
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Film and Artistic Expression
CMS 3100
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Law and Film
CMS 3120
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Film, Reflections of a Century I: 1900 to 1949
CMS 3130
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

African American Cinema
CMS 3140
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Subcultures in Film
CMS 3160
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Film, Reflections of a Century II: 1950 to 1999
CMS 3170
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Horror Film
CMS 3180
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Family on Film
CMS 3190
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Film, Reflections of a Century III: The 21st Century
CMS 3200
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Comedy Film
CMS 3210
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The City on Film
CMS 3235
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Gender Expression in Film
CMS 3240
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The American Crime Film
CMS 3270
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Romance, Love, and Sex on Film
CMS 3280
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Sports Films: Underdogs, Champions, and Gutter Balls
CMS 3290
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

A Critical Look at Television in Society: From “I Love Lucy” to Honey Boo Boo
CMS 3700
/ 4 credits
Television is much more than a passive, incessant means of diversion—it is a powerful environment of ideas, emotions, and values that influences people’s thoughts, actions, and relationships. Students become acquainted with current issues concerning television in society and explore the impact of television on society. Aspects examined include the 1950s and mass culture, viewer response, serial/episodic structure, and the rise of cable.

Writing for the Mass Media
JOU 3270
Refer to Journalism under Humanities Courses for description.

Media Literacy
JOU 3280
Refer to Journalism under Humanities Courses for description.

Psychology and the Media
PSY 3245
Refer to Psychology under Natural Sciences Courses for description.

Advanced Psychology of Communication
PSY 3365
Refer to Psychology under Natural Sciences Courses for description.

Gender Studies Courses

Introduction to Gender and Sexuality
GND 1200
Refer to Gender Studies Courses (Interdisciplinary Studies) for description.

Women for Change in the Middle East
GND 3170
/ 4 credits
The Middle East is mired in controversy over basic human rights, particularly in the area of women’s rights. A growing number of Muslim and Jewish women artists/activists, living in the Middle East or in the West, have joined the fight for equality. Using film, literature, and theatre, advocates for peace and equality are studied across ethnic, religious, and national lines.

American Women Writers
LIT 3665
Refer to Literature Courses: 3000–3999 (School of Humanities) for description.

Gender and the Law
LEG 3070
Refer to Legal Studies Courses for description.

Masculinities: Feminist Perspectives
SOC 3705
Refer to Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Legal Studies Courses

Arts and Entertainment Law
AMG 3170
Refer to Arts Management Courses (School of the Arts) for description.

Law, Ethics, and the Media
CMS 3020
Refer to Communications Courses for description.

The Law and Film
CMS 3120
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Introduction to Criminal Law
LEG 1510
/ 4 credits
Topics include the structure of the criminal justice system; the impact of the Supreme Court on criminal justice; and the process of arrest, prosecution, and sentencing.

Introduction to Civil Law
LEG 1520
/ 4 credits
An exploration of the day-to-day applications of civil law: who can sue and be sued, the basis for lawsuits, and how to win cases. Through case studies and mock litigation, students explore such issues as product liability, medical malpractice, negligence, strict liability, and legal procedure, including document production and the use of expert witnesses.

The Supreme Court and Civil Liberties
LEG 3000
/ 4 credits
Focuses on major Supreme Court decisions pertaining to civil liberties. Cases dealing with the broad issue of privacy are examined, including those concerned with free speech, reproduction, and sexual preference. Students gain a better understanding of the current state of the law on major civil liberties issues and a better grasp of how Supreme Court decisions affect everyday life.

Anatomy of a Trial and the Jury Process
LEG 3010
/ 4 credits
Topics include the mechanism of the U.S. jury system; the truth-seeking process of juries; the concepts of mistrials, jury nullification, and hung juries; and a consideration of whether trial by jury is the best method for attaining justice. Students participate in a week-by-week mock trial, permitting hands-on experience in jury selection, opening statements, cross-examination, and summation.

Law and the Family
LEG 3020
/ 4 credits
The law touches everyone from conception to the grave and beyond. Family interactions between spouses, parents, children, and elders are dictated by rights and duties defined in the law. This course explores how the law weaves in and out of family structures in an attempt to protect and preserve certain rights and values.

Environmental Law
LEG 3025
/ 4 credits
U.S. environmental law and policy, the common-law foundations of environmental law, and the regulatory process and toolkit are examined. The focus is on major environmental statutes: the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, the Compensation and Recovery Act (Superfund), and the Safe Drinking Water Act.

White-Collar Crime
LEG 3060
/ 4 credits
White-collar criminality, the law of economic crime, and political crimes associated with white-collar crime are investigated through the lens of class and privilege. Students compare traditional and white-collar crimes, including organized crime, and associated prosecutions such as conspiracy, mail fraud, racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations (RICO), money laundering, corporate criminal liability, and fraud upon financial institutions and against the government.

Legal Research
LEG 3065
/ 4 credits
Students learn how to research the law and assess both its impact and effectiveness through research projects on the impact of law in a range of areas (e.g., consumer rights; the rights of women, students, minorities, and aliens; the rights of both the accused and the victims of crime).

Gender and the Law
LEG 3070
/ 4 credits
Focuses on the evolution of the law in regard to gender-related issues, including sexual harassment in the workplace, gender discrimination in employment, and reproductive rights. Readings include key Supreme Court cases that have shaped the law concerning gender. A background in law is not required.

Capital Punishment in America
LEG 3080
/ 4 credits
An examination of the historical, moral, and legal issues surrounding the death penalty. Students confront the major controversial issues in the current death penalty debate and learn to form arguments from both the pro– and anti–death penalty perspectives. Topics include retribution, deterrence, proportionality, discrimination, error, and public opinion. Students analyze Supreme Court decisions and scholarly treatments of capital punishment.

The Nature and Function of Law
LEG 3185
/ 4 credits
The study of law from a liberal arts perspective, emphasizing the role that law and the legal order play in the institutional arrangements and human relations of a society. The course examines the basic concepts, language, institutions, and forms of law that characterize the American legal order.

Communications Law
LEG 3200
/ 4 credits
Explores the American legal system and examines the role of each branch of government—executive, legislative, and judicial—in shaping the laws that govern the right to free speech and the right to privacy, along with conflicts between those two rights that arise in the media, the private sector, and public institutions.

Current Social Issues and the Law
LEG 3300
/ 4 credits
Focuses on current legal issues such as abortion, the death penalty, and affirmative action. The pivotal Supreme Court cases establishing the law in each area are read. In addition, research in sociology and psychology is examined to understand the conditions that led to the key court decisions and the impact of those decisions on society.

Immigration Law
LEG 3390
/ 4 credits
Issues related to immigration law are placed in context by reviewing their historical evolution. Students examine current law and issues related to family and labor-based petitions for permanent residence, political asylum and refugee applications, the status of undocumented workers, immigration and national security, and deportation policies and procedures.

Law, Order, and Disobedience
LEG 3420
/ 4 credits
Protection of civil rights in the U.S. has been characterized by both civil disobedience and widespread violence. This course analyzes milestones in American history, periods of unrest, and the sociolegal changes associated with them. Landmark constitutional cases, law, and justice in U.S. culture are studied, and historical lawbreakers and high-profile dissidents are examined through various media.

Juvenile Delinquency and the Law
LEG 3460
/ 4 credits
Examines the causes and controls of juvenile delinquency. Topics include a historical overview of children, their legal status, the evolution of the juvenile justice system, alternatives to incarceration and community-based solutions, and reform efforts. The effectiveness of prevention and deterrence efforts is evaluated.

Censorship: Sociological and Legal Perspectives
LEG 3480
/ 4 credits
Sociologists have long understood that the study of censorship can yield an understanding of the structure and values of a society. Modern societies define and enforce limits on expression by defining certain forms of expression as obscene, pornographic, subversive, etc. Censorship in film, literature, and theatre is the major focus.

American Constitutional Law
POL 3050
Refer to Political Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Crime and Delinquency
SOC 3485
Refer to Sociology Courses for description.

Conflict Resolution
SOC 3490
Refer to Sociology Courses for description.

Sexual Assault: The Courts and Society Today
SOC 3555
Refer to Sociology Courses for description.

Political Science Courses

Introduction to U.S. Politics
POL 1570
Refer to Political Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

American Constitutional Law
POL 3050
Refer to Political Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

The Nature and Function of Law
LEG 3185
Refer to Legal Studies Courses for description.

The Politics of American Education
POL 3270
/ 4 credits
Designed to familiarize students with the political foundations of education in the U.S. in historical, philosophical, and social context. This course covers the historical development of the political education system in the U.S., current political and legal trends in education policy, and problems and choices facing education in the future.

Social Sciences: General Courses

Business Ethics
BUS 3090
Refer to Business Courses for description.

Senior Capstone
CAP 4800
/ 4 credits
A one-semester project that involves empirical research, library investigation, or an applied learning experience (on or off campus). Regardless of the format, the project culminates in a significant paper. Course sections are overseen by faculty within each major to foster integration of prior coursework, and should be selected in consultation with academic advisors. Required for all liberal studies students.
Prerequisite: WRI 1110 and completion of 90 credits

Modernism, Media, and the Middle Class
CMS 3030
Refer to Humanities: General under Humanities Courses for description.

The Politics of Green
ENV 3180
Refer to Environmental Studies under Natural Sciences Courses for description.

Women for Change in the Middle East
GND 3170
Refer to Gender Studies Courses for description.

Health Issues in the 21st Century
IDI 3350
/ 4 credits
Health issues in the 21st century are presented from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include the origins of emerging health and related public policy issues; the impact on the local, national, and global economy and educational systems; national security; preventive efforts; and approaches to planning policy that address these health challenges now and in the future.

American Music: A Cultural History
MUS 3470
Refer to Music under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Sociology Courses

Introduction to Sociology
SOC 1500
Refer to Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Psychology of Personal and Social Change
SOC 3055
/ 4 credits
Focuses on personal development by exploring theoretical foundations of and practical techniques for the integration of body, mind, and spirit. Self-awareness skills are enhanced, and strategies that facilitate personal growth within the contexts of family, community, and the world are examined. Students study mainstream psychological theory and practice, as well as Eastern and Western philosophical and spiritual traditions, using didactic, interactive, and experiential modalities.

Contemporary Popular Culture
SOC 3315
/ 4 credits
Combines readings, viewings, and discussion of various forms of contemporary culture since the mid-1960s, such as popular films and music, design and fashion, architecture, magazines, art, television, and the new imaging technologies. Topics include avant-garde, popular, and mass culture; high and low aesthetics; stereotypes; cultural hierarchy; identity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity; and American concepts of age and class.

Sociology of the Five Senses
SOC 3355
/ 4 credits
Using a variety of sensory mediums—such as radio (sound), movies and photography (sight), sculpture (touch), and cooking (taste, smell)—this course explores different sensory cultures (blind and deaf), their social meanings, and social movements; the evolution of medical terminology; media representations such as sign language and Braille by, for, and about these cultures; and how they have changed since the early 1900s.

Research Methods
SOC 3405
Refer to Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Racial Inequalities
SOC 3415
/ 4 credits
Given the ethnic complexity of society, major social institutions—including education, criminal justice, health care, social services, and business—face many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and future of race and ethnicity in American society, and how immigration, culture, religion, education, and income play parts in prejudice, discrimination, and racial inequalities.

Studies in Victimology
SOC 3575
/ 4 credits
Focuses on the central character in a criminal act—the victim. Objectives include understanding victimization and learning how to offer a victim real help. Diverse reactions are analyzed and various forms of practical help are examined. Special attention is given to such crimes as sexual assault and the various categories of abuse (child, adolescent, elder, parental, and spousal), and to the survivors of homicide victims.

Arrow up icon | << School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education home