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ARH 1500: Introduction to Art History

Students study a broad range of art (e.g., painting, sculpture, architecture) from antiquity to the present. Lectures focus on works of art and their relationship to their historical and social context. This course is intended for students with little or no background in art history. Students cannot receive credit for this course and ARH 1010 or ARH 1020. Closed to Purchase College art history majors.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3100: Picasso: The Man, His Art, and His Critics

Deified, demonized, or mythologized, Pablo Picasso remained indisputably the consummate artist of the 20th century. As a painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and set designer, Picasso absorbed techniques and traditions culled from various Western and non-Western art sources. Students study his numerous styles, from his early academic exercises through the Blue Period, Rose Period, African Period, Cubism, and Surrealism, and his influence on other artists.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3121: Contemporary Art

The first distinctly American modern movement in art, Abstract Expressionism, burst onto the international scene around 1950. American artists then pioneered the major movements of Pop Art, photorealism, earth art, and minimalism, while simultaneously participating in the more international developments: happenings, environments, conceptualism, neo-expressionism, and new figuration. Students explore the multiple directions in American and European art from 1945 to the present.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3180: American Art

A study of American painting and sculpture from colonial times to the present, focusing on American contributions to romanticism, realism, impressionism, abstraction, Pop art, and postmodernism. Lectures also cover African American art, Latino American art, and Jewish artists as part of this opportunity to learn about American history through art.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3193: 20th-Century Photography

Examines the history of photography within both the historical and the neo-avant-gardes. Special attention is given to photographic activities of the Weimar Republic, the Soviet avant-garde, surrealism, and American pictorialism, modernism, and FSA documentary work, as well as the postwar formations of the New York School, conceptual art, and photographic postmodernism.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3415: Modern Sculpture and Three-Dimensional Art

Beginning with Auguste Rodin, generally considered the first modern sculptor, students explore the changes in concepts, methods, and materials that have brought about dramatic shifts in ideas about what constitutes sculpture. Movements examined include Cubism and Futurism, constructivism, Dada and surrealism, Pop Art, minimalism, super realism, conceptual art, Arte Povera, and Scatter art. There are visits to museums on and off campus.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3445: Pop Art

Though cool and noncommittal, Pop art posed serious questions about our relationships to society and culture. This course begins with the formation of the Pop art aesthetic (Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Larry Rivers) and moves to a detailed study of the works of major Pop artists like Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, and Roy Lichtenstein. The Pop phenomenon in Europe is also examined in an international and intermedia context, as is the formation of a “post-Pop” aesthetic in the 1980s and 1990s.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3455: Impressionism

The simultaneous development of various painters associated with Impressionism (e.g., Monet, Renoir, Morisot, Pissarro, Manet, Degas, Cassatt) is presented. This radical new art movement is traced from the first Impressionist exhibition of 1874 to the last exhibition of 1886 and the appearance of the post-Impressionists. Students explore the shared relationships of the Impressionist artists.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3510: 19th-Century Art

European art from the French Revolution to 1900, with movements in France, Germany, and England receiving particular attention. Major artists studied include David, Gericault, Delacroix, Ingres, Frederich, Constable, Turner, the Pre-Raphaelites, Daumier, Manet, Degas, Monet, and Gauguin.

Credits: 4

PREREQ: ARH1000-1994 Or ARH2000-2994 Or ARH3000-3994 Or ARH4000-4994

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3520: Art of the ’80s, ’90s, and 21st Century

A retrospective and prospective point of view is used to analyze contemporary art, beginning with the many coexisting styles and schools of the pluralistic 1970s, progressing to the powerful neo-expressionist images of the 1980s, and then considering the globalism of the 1990s. Discussions also contemplate the increasingly provocative content of much recent art and the 21st-century fusion of existing styles.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3580: Tribal Arts of Africa

The scope of this course begins with archaeological studies of prehistoric artifacts and continues with the geography and traditions of historical cultures. Emphasis is on visual vocabulary, identifying materials and techniques, and recognizing formal elements of design and style. Textiles, pottery, utensils, tools, architecture, sculpture, costume, masking, and ritual objects are viewed and discussed.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3690: The Cubist Epoch

An interdisciplinary examination of Cubism both as a phenomenon and an artistic movement. Discussions include Cubism’s style, history, and identification with modernism and modernity. In particular, the course explores the influence of Cubism in film, advertising, art, theatre, dance, music, and literature.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3715: Pioneers of Modern Art: Romanticism to Realism

Traces the origins of modernism, beginning with the growth of neoclassicism and the development of Romanticism in France, England, Germany, and Spain. With the rise of the middle class came a growing interest in artistic representation of the everyday world. By the mid-19th century artists began to challenge the emphasis on traditional history painting. Students examine how realism developed in the work of artists like Courbet and Manet, which led to the Impressionism of Monet and Degas. Selected post-Impressionists (e.g., van Gogh, Gauguin) and parallel developments in America are also considered.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
ARH 3730: Realism in Art

Various artists from the 17th century to the present have worked in a style that can be termed realist. This course explores the definition of realism in art and examines why these artists chose to work in an empirical style. How do their styles differ, and what does their work tell us about the societies in which they lived? Students choose and place in social context a 20th-century or contemporary realist to discover how the meaning of realism has evolved over the centuries.

Credits: 4

Department: Liberal Studies
PAD 1100: Fundamentals of Painting

This course develops each student's unique personal vision and style. Students are encouraged to be creative and to develop "image books"; and sequential paintings to foster awareness of their own emergent tendencies. Students learn the fundamental aspects of painting and visual form, including color theory, thematic development, composition, palette and canvas preparation, and painting media and techniques.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
PAD 1212: Intermediate Painting

This course develops each student’s unique personal vision and style. Students are encouraged to be creative and to develop “image books” and sequential paintings to foster awareness of their own emergent tendencies. Students learn the fundamental aspects of painting and visual form, including color theory, thematic development, composition, palette and canvas preparation, and painting media and techniques.

Credits: 3

PREREQ: (PAD1211 Or SOA1030 ) Or GPA1150

Department: Liberal Studies
PAD 2015: Drawing from Nature

Designed for all levels, beginning through advanced, this course uses the Purchase campus and environs as its subject. Students work with a variety of drawing materials, developing their abilities to observe and interpret landscape. May be repeated once for credit.Note: The class meets in the studio for the first session and during inclement weather. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to off-campus sites.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
PAD 2040: Life Drawing

This studio/art history course offers each student the opportunity to draw from a live model as well as from the wealth of art history’s famous masters like Rembrandt and da Vinci. The form and structure of the model are explored in a variety of media. Traditional and modern drawing concepts are introduced, including gesture, contour, relational technique, value, and composition.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
PAD 2075: Drawing From Nature

Designed for all levels, beginning through advanced, this course uses the Purchase campus and environs as its subject. Students work with a variety of drawing materials, developing their abilities to observe and interpret landscape. The class meets in the studio for the first session and during inclement weather. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to off-campus sites.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
VIS 1350: Sculpture and Dance Intensive: From Theory to Studio

A two-week arts intensive for students in other disciplines (closed to majors in the School of Art+Design). An arts-based tool set is introduced to enhance students’ intellectual, creative, and social growth by developing project-based strategies, from idea to implementation. The objective is to build dynamic collaboration and self-critical skills, and to merge artistic modes of thinking and practices into problem-solving processes, while establishing a bonding dynamic and interdisciplinary spirit among its participants.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
PHO 1101: Introduction to Digital Photography

An introduction to the techniques, current practices, and history surrounding digital photography. Editing techniques are covered, with attention to image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop and RAW files. Composition, lighting, point of view, and use of narrative are explored. A digital camera is required; cameras may be borrowed, as available, from Campus Technology Services. Students may not earn credit for both PHO 1100 (offered by the School of Art+Design) and PHO 1101.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
PHO 2105: Intro to B&W Photography

Designed to provide a solid foundation in the basic techniques of black and white photography and darkroom procedures, this course concentrates on developing and printing a series of photographic assignments, along with demonstrations, critiques, and presentations of selected photographers’ work. After a review of basic skills, intermediate students select a theme and develop a photographic series. Students need a 35mm camera and light meter.

Credits: 3

Department: Liberal Studies
PHO 3755: Introduction to Photoshop

An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of Photoshop CC. Exposure, composition, color, retouching, resolution, and preparation of image files for on-screen and print use are among the techniques covered. Assignments include both technical and aesthetic concerns.

Credits: 2

Department: Liberal Studies