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Undergraduate Courses with Noncredit Seats

Take an undergraduate credit-bearing course on a noncredit basis at a reduced tuition rate! Noncredit seats are limited in these credit courses and are available by permission of the instructor.

Costs

  • $180 for the noncredit option in a 1-credit course*
  • $260 for the noncredit option in a 1.5-credit course*
  • $320 for the noncredit option in a 2-credit course*
  • $520 for the noncredit option in a 3-credit course*
  • $625 for the noncredit option in a 4-credit course*

*plus applicable fees. In addition to the tuition and any listed lab fees, there is a $25 nonrefundable noncredit registration fee paid once per semester. Please note: Specialized course tuition rates may vary from the above.

More Information

  • Students who register for this option do not receive college credit or grades.
  • This noncredit option is limited to students who are not enrolled in a degree program at Purchase College.
  • Because noncredit spaces are limited in these credit courses, early registration is advised.
  • Students may not switch between the credit and noncredit sections of these courses after the add/drop period.
  • Early registration discounts do not apply to these courses.

Fall 2021

Registration begins Monday, July 19

You can find more information in the online course search. Choose “Fall 2021 Noncredit (View Only)” and click on “Course Search.”

Art History

The art and architecture of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and medieval Europe, presented in terms of their visual and cultural significance.

ARH 1010 | Online | Noncredit | $625
Instructor: Paul Kaplan
August 30 – December 17
Mondays and Thursdays, 10:30am – 12:10pm
Registration Form | Credit Card Authorization

Arts Management

This introductory survey provides an overview of creative industries and management theory and principles common in both the nonprofit and commercial sectors, preparing students for upper-level courses in the arts management program. Topics include history of arts management, arts and creativity, leadership and management, business structures, programming, marketing, funding, finance and budgeting, arts advocacy, activism and social justice.

AMG 1100 | Online | Noncredit | $625
Instructor: Dawn Gibson-Brehon
August 30 – December 17
TBA
Registration Form | Credit Card Authorization

Dance

A study of the origins and training in the technique of hip-hop as a contemporary form of “street dance.”

DPD 1060 | Lecture | Noncredit | $260
Instructor: Shawn Garnier
Location: Dance Building, room 1001
August 30 – December 17
Mondays and Thursdays, 10:30am – 12:00pm
Registration Form | Credit Card Authorization

Liberal Studies

Contemporary culture cannot be adequately understood without considering the impact of religious extremism. While other factors play a role, it is religious passions that fuel the jihadist movement in the Islamic world, incite violence in the occupied Palestinian territories, and amplify culture wars between secular and religious forces in the U.S. This course examines the root causes of such cultural phenomena, asking whether fundamentalism can exist in modern society without leading to bloodshed.

LBS 3014 | Online | Noncredit | $625
Instructor: George Keteku
Location: TBA
August 30 – December 17
Mondays, 6:30 – 8:30pm
Registration Form | Credit Card Authorization

How we treat animals reveals a great deal about who we are, as a society and species. This course examines intersections between animals, humans and society from multiple perspectives (ecology, history, sociology, literature). Using text, media, documentaries and photojournalism, students explore contemporary topics, including animal intelligence and emotions, biodiversity and keystone species, animals in captivity, and zoonotic disease (i.e., Coronavirus).

LBS 3028 | Online | Noncredit | $625
Instructor: Lisa Jean Moore
Location: TBA
August 30 – December 17
Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30pm
Registration Form | Credit Card Authorization

Political Science

Introduces the historical and political debates that resulted in the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. Case law and collateral readings relevant to the construction of the U.S. constitutional government are used to explore theories of jurisprudence, structures of courts, aspects of litigation, the nature and scope of judicial review and constitutional adjudication, and the role of the judiciary in the maintenance of national power.

POL 3050 | Lecture | Noncredit | $625
Instructor: Samuel Galloway
Location: Natural Sciences Building, room 3001
August 30 – December 17
Tuesdays and Fridays, 4:30 – 6:10pm
Registration Form | Credit Card Authorization