faculty

Faculty and Staff Footnotes

February–March 2014

Appointments, Awards, Grants, and Prizes
Conferences, Presentations, Panels, and Educational Programs
Publications
Recordings, Films, Exhibitions, Performances, and Media Appearances

Appointments, Awards, Grants, and Prizes

  • Donna Dennis, professor of art and design (sculpture), received the Award of Merit Medal for Sculpture from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. This $25,000 award is given annually on a rotating basis to an outstanding person in America representing one of the following arts: painting, the short story, sculpture, the novel, poetry, and drama. The first Award of Merit was conferred in 1942. Dennis’ work was selected from the Academy’s 2014 Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts (March 6–April 12). Exhibiting artists were chosen from 150 nominees submitted by the 250 members of the Academy. Participating artists are eligible to receive one of 11 awards.
     
  • Christopher J. Holland, dean of students and academic support services, was named the corporate relations coordinator on the region II board of Student Affairs Professionals in Higher Education (NASPA).
     
  • Kristopher Jansma, lecturer in creative writing, had his novel The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards (Penguin Press, March 2013) chosen as a 2014 Notable Book by the American Library Association. Penguin Press released it in paperback this month. The novel received Honorable Mention for the distinguished Pen/Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction, and it was long-listed for the Carnegie Award for Excellence in Fiction.
     
  • Sarah Walker, lecturer in art and design, received the Jacob Lawrence Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Walker’s work is included in the 2014 Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts (March 6–April 12) at the Academy’s galleries in their historic Audubon Terrace location in upper Manhattan. This $10,000 award recognizes outstanding achievement in the visual arts and is given to a visual artist whose work is selected from the invitational exhibition.
     
  • Gary Waller, professor of literature and cultural studies, has been appointed to the editorial board of the Joyce Carol Oates Journal, headquartered at the University of San Francisco.
     
    Purchase College Faculty Research & Development Awards
    Emily and Eugene Grant Faculty Award
    Doris and Carl Kempner Senior Faculty Research Award
    Juanita and Joseph Leff Senior Faculty Research Award
    Dee and Robert Topol Faculty Development Awards
     
  • 2013–14 Emily and Eugene Grant Faculty Award
    Thanks to the generosity of Emily and Eugene Grant, recipients of this new faculty award each receive $2,500 to subsidize research, performances, exhibitions, conferences, travel, and/or recital expenses. The 2013–14 recipients are: John Gitlitz (Political Science), for a research project on the use of Article 15 of the Peruvian constitution in relation to statutory rape/early marriage cases; Julian Kreimer (Painting/Drawing), for the Studio Sessions series of one-day exhibitions and panel discussions; and Jeffrey Taylor (Arts Management), for research in Germany on judicial evidence relating to the convicted art forger Wolfgang Beltracchi.
     
  • 2014–16 Doris and Carl Kempner Senior Faculty Research Award
    Thanks to the generosity of Doris and Carl Kempner, the recipient of this award receives $5,000 over two years to subsidize research, performances, exhibitions, conferences, travel, and/or recital expenses. During these two years, the selected faculty member also carries the title of Doris and Carl Kempner Distinguished Professor. The Doris and Carl Kempner Distinguished Professor for 2014–16 is Stephen Cooke (Chemistry), who will be linking his ongoing work in spectroscopy to art conservation and forensics.
     
  • 2014–15 Juanita and Joseph Leff Senior Faculty Research Award
    Thanks to the generosity of Juanita and Joseph Leff, the recipient of the Leff Senior Faculty Research Award receives $5,000 over one year to subsidize research, performances, exhibitions, conferences, travel, and/or recital expenses. During this period, the selected faculty member also carries the title of Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professor. The Juanita and Joseph Leff Distinguished Professors for 2014–15 are Casey Haskins (Philosophy), who will be participating in the Institute in Comparative Philosophy, and Chrys Ingraham (Sociology), who will pursue an ongoing collaboration on the research study “Minding the Gap: Exploring the Textually Mediated Experience in Institutional Accessibility.”
     
  • Dee and Robert Topol Summer 2014 Faculty Development Award
    This award, thanks to the generosity of Dee and Robert Topol, provides recipients with a summer stipend of $3,000 to help defray the costs of writing a grant, developing a new course, or significantly redesigning an existing course. The recipients for Summer 2014 are James Daly (Biology), to develop a new course on cellular and molecular techniques; and Steve Lambert (New Media), to develop a new course on the GNU/Linux platform.

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Conferences, Presentations, Panels, and Educational Programs

  • Michael Bell-Smith, assistant professor of new media, presented his work on February 18 at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University as part of its Film/Video Critique: Image Employment course. He also participated in a conversation with Clemens Jahn and artist John Miller on the writings of Vilém Flusser and postdigital media critique at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) on March 8.
     
  • Laura Chmielewski, associate professor of history, presented the paper “Holy Rolling: Religious Culture and Maritime Enterprise” at the Forum on European Expansion and Global Interaction biennial meeting in February at Tulane University in New Orleans.
     
  • Christopher J. Holland, dean of students and academic support services, presented “Leading Student Affairs in a Marketplace Culture” with David Jones (vice president for student affairs, University of Minnesota-Manakato), Ross Bryan (assistant vice president for student affairs, Tulane University), and Margaret King (former vice president for student affairs, University of Alabama) at the annual NASPA conference in Baltimore, Md. (March 15–19).
     
  • Chrys Ingraham, professor of sociology, presented “Minding the Gap: The Textually Mediated Experience of Institutional Accessibility—Building an Institutional Ethnographic Research Model” with Joan Dacher (The Sage Colleges) on February 21 at the Eastern Sociological Society annual conference in Baltimore, Md.
     
  • Mary Kosut, associate professor of media, society, and the arts, presented the paper “Worker Bees/Working Bees: Interspecies Ethics” at the Eastern Sociological Society annual conference in Baltimore, Md., on February 21. She also moderated the panel “Spaces and Identities.” On February 12, she presented “Insects Inside the White Cube: The Bee in/as Art” at the Purchase college faculty colloquium, hosted by the provost. Most recently, on March 13, she participated in a public conversation, “Forrest Bess: The Insider’s Outsider,” with writer/producer Chuck Smith at the Neuberger Museum of Art on the topics of visions, self-hermaphrodite body modifications, mental states, and where art comes from.
     
  • George Kraemer, professor of environmental studies and biology, presented the workshop “Cultivation of seaweeds in Long Island Sound for Food, Feeds and Fertilizer” at the Connecticut Northeast Organic Farming Association’s 32nd Annual Winter Conference at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury on March 1.
     
  • Julian Kreimer, assistant professor of art and design (painting/drawing), had his reviews of exhibitions by Philip Taaffe, Zachary Keeting, Rachel Farbiarz, and Sebastian Black (forthcoming) published in Art in America.
     
  • Steve Lambert, assistant professor of new media, is part of Confravision, “an exploration of future challenges and possible solutions, facilitated by an innovative online conference platform.” Lambert and Stephen Duncombe taught a five-day School for Creative Activism in Macedonia in the former Republic of Yugoslavia.
     
  • Keith Landa, director of the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center, presented “Shared Services ePortfolios Projects” at the Fall 2013 SUNY Wizard Conference (IT Service Management), on November 19 in Syracuse, N.Y.
     
  • Jason Pine, assistant professor of media, society, and the arts, guest-taught a class session of a course on the television show The Wire and led a faculty seminar in the Department of Anthropology at Duke University.
     
  • Christopher Robbins, assistant professor of art and design (sculpture), traveled to Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego, Calif., to run cross-border workshops with Casa del Migrante, a home for recently deported immigrants; Minuteman founder Jim Gilchrist; San Diegans for Secure Borders; and the artist group ToroLab. Robbins was also invited to guest-lecture on social justice and participatory action research in Pratt Institute’s critical and visual studies program, and spoke at Freehouse: Radicalizing the Local, an international symposium organized by Jeanne van Heeswijk, Ashraf Osman, and Pablo Calderón, held in Rotterdam, Netherlands (January 15–17).
     
  • Michelle Stewart, chair of the School of Film and Media Studies, organized and participated in a two-day international colloquium, “Narrating Urban Collectivity: Art and Activism in the City,” held in Marseille, France, this past December. Stewart was a 2013–14 fellow at the Institute for Advanced Research at Aix-Marseille University (IMéRA).
     
  • Marie Sciangula, assistant director of the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center, presented an electronic resources/Moodle demonstration at the WALDO (Westchester Academic Library Directors Organization) Electronic Resources Committee’s eReserves Symposium at Fordham University on February 27.
     
  • Kim Detterbeck, art librarian, and Marie Sciangula, assistant director of the Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center, in conjunction with Elizabeth Guffey, professor of art history, and the Art History Club, organized the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon satellite event at the Purchase College Library on February 1.
     
  • Gary Waller, professor of literature and cultural studies, will present two versions of a lecture from his current research, “‘Verkündigung nach Tizian’: Fades, Traces, and Transformations of the Annunciation in the Dis-enchantment of Early Modern Culture,” to international conferences in March and June: “Mary Under Duress: The Cult of the Virgin Mary in Anglo-Spanish Europe, ca. 1525–1675” at Johns Hopkins University; and “The Virgin Mary in Britain and Ireland” at York St. John University and the Centre for Marian Studies, Roehampton University.

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Publications

  • Jason Pine, assistant professor of media, society, and the arts, published an essay, “Transnational Neomelodica Music and Alternative Economic Cultures,” co-written with Francisco Pepe, in the journal California Italian Studies.
     
  • Lenora Champagne, professor of theatre and performance, had her review essay on Japanese theatre and dance in New York City and Tokyo, “West Meets East,” published in PAJ, A Journal of Performance and Art, Vol. 36, No. 1, January 2014 (PAJ 106).
     
  • Laura Chimielewski, associate professor of history, had her new book The Atlantic Experience: Peoples, Places, Ideas published by Palgrave Macmillan. The book, a comprehensive overview of the Atlantic World, was co-written with Catherine Armstrong of Loughborough University, UK.
     
  • Mary Kosut, associate professor of media, society, and the arts, and Lisa Jean Moore, professor of sociology and gender studies, published the article “Bees Making Art: Insect Aesthetics and the Ecological Moment” in the peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary animal studies journal Humanimalia on February 4.
     
  • Steve Lambert, assistant professor of new media, wrote a one-word “essay” responding to the question “Is there a place for satire and comedy within socially engaged art?,” as part of Open Engagement’s 100 Questions 100 Days series.
     
  • Shaka McGlotten, associate professor of media, society, and the arts, announced the publication of his new book Virtual Intimacies, Media, Affect, and Queer Sociality, released in December 2013 by SUNY Press.
     
  • Kathleen McCormick, professor of literature and pedagogy, has had her short story, “Mrs. Daley’s Diamond Ring,” selected for inclusion in Crack the Spine’s annual print anthology (spring 2014). It was originally published by Crack the Spine in December 2013.
     
  • Gary Waller, professor of literature and cultural studies, has published “Ralegh’s ‘As You Came from the Holy Land’ and the rival virgin queens of late sixteenth-century England” in Literary and visual Ralegh (Manchester University Press, 2013). Waller has been invited by the British Shakespeare Association to contribute an essay to their 2015 journal on the Royal Shakespeare Company’s 2014 season of “Roaring Girls” and strong female characters in Jacobean drama. He will also take part in a conference on the RSC’s performance of Love’s Victory by the 17th-century dramatist Mary Wroth.
     
  • Michelle Stewart, chair of the School of Film and Media Studies, has written an article, “The Ethnocultural Film Festival as Media Happening: French-Maghrebi Film in Marseille,” that will be published this spring in Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture. Stewart and Jason Pine, assistant professor of media, society, and the arts, are co-authors of an article, “Vocational Embodiments of the Precariat in The Girlfriend Experience and Magic Mike,” forthcoming in TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies (Spring 2014).

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Recordings, Films, Exhibitions, Performances, and Media Appearances

  • Michael Bell-Smith, assistant professor of new media, has work included in the exhibition The Sunken Living Room at Franklin Street Works in Stamford, Conn., on view March 22–May 25.
     
  • Lenora Champagne, professor of theatre and performance, will read from her current and previous work on April 7 as part of the Nonlinear Lineage: Now and Then program at the Abrons Arts Center in Manhattan.
     
  • Rachel Dickstein, visiting assistant professor of theatre and performance, will have her new play, The World is Round, presented at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), beginning with previews on April 17 and running through April 30.
     
  • Riccardo Hernandez, assistant professor of theatre design/technology, had his design work for the Theatre for a New Audience’s production of King Lear recognized by Ben Brantley in a New York Times review on March 27. Hernandez also created the scenic design for the new production of The Library, directed by Steven Soderbergh, at the Public Theater.
     
  • Mary Kosut, associate professor of media, society, and the arts, and artist Mike Schreiber curated Bad Boys, a solo exhibition of paintings by Zuriel Waters at the Group Club Association (GCA) in Bushwick, Brooklyn (January 24–February 15).
     
  • Julian Kreimer, assistant professor of art and design (painting/drawing), had work included in The Land Has Many Parts, an exhibition focused on contemporary approaches to landscape, at Jane Deering Gallery in Santa Barbara, Calif. (January 15–February 15), where he participated in a roundtable with three other artists about their work. His work was also included in Interchanges, a three-person exhibition that opened in October 2013 at the Virginia Center for Latin American Art in Richmond, Va., and he produced an artist’s book for Let’s Talk About Love Baby, an exhibition curated by Chido Johnson at Printed Matter Inc. in New York City (February 14–March 14, 2013). Additionally, Kreimer presented excerpts of his article, “Painting Under Obama,” at a reading from the fourth edition of the art journal Paper Monument at Bookcourt in Brooklyn, and participated in an n+1 podcast on contemporary art and politics.
     
  • Steve Lambert, assistant professor of new media, and Stephen Duncombe were interviewed about creativity, politics, and their Center for Artistic Activism on March 17 by Regine Debatty, a blogger, curator, and critic for we-make-money-not-art.com.
     
  • Warren Lehrer, professor of art and design (graphic design), was the featured guest on Bookworm, a KCRW (Los Angeles) radio program with host Michael Silverblatt on March 13.
     
  • Christopher McCann, lecturer in acting, had his work as the Earl of Gloucester in the Theatre for a New Audience’s production of King Lear recognized by Ben Brantley in a New York Times review on March 27.
     
  • Sara Magenheimer, lecturer in new media, had her video Nothing Comes From Talking (But Sound) included on January 7 in A Light Spray, a group video screening curated by Ashby Lee Collinson at the Portland Museum of Modern Art (inside Mississippi Records) in Oregon. Additional screenings of her work include a parallel screening of Seven Signs that Mean Silence at the Soloway Gallery in Brooklyn and the Living Art Museum in Reykjavik, Iceland, on February 9. Magenheimer also has a sculpture in the Brucennial exhibition in New York City (March 7–April 4) and in the Whitney Houston Biennial, a one-night art event on March 9 (during Armory Arts Week) in Brooklyn.
     
  • Lenka Pichlíková, visiting assistant professor of theatre and performance, will perform in a one-woman play, Gertrude, in two performances on April 6 at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Stamford, Conn. This is the final presentation in the 2013–14 season of Joyful Noise’s Voices Then & Now series. Pichlíková translated and adapted the play—a dramatic interpretation of Queen Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother—from a Czech text by Anna Hodková.
     
  • Christopher Robbins, assistant professor of art and design (sculpture), had his work Meet in the Middle, in collaboration with Douglas Paulson, featured as the first “assignment” on the new PBS Digital series The Art Assignment.
     
  • Jordan Schildcrout, assistant professor of theatre and performance, is the dramaturg for And Baby Makes Seven, a comedy about gay and lesbian parenting by Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright Paula Vogel, directed by Marc Stuart Weitz, at the New Ohio Theatre in New York City. The production runs March 11–April 12.
     
  • J. Allen Suddeth, lecturer in acting, was fight director for the new production of Aladdin at the New Amsterdam Theatre on Broadway.
     
  • Anith Yavich, assistant professor of theatre design/technology, created the costumes for the David Henry Hwang production of Kung Fu at the Pershing Square Signature Center. Yavich’s costume designs are also featured in the world premiere of Tales From Red Vienna at the Manhattan Theatre Club, which runs through April.

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Many of the above activities are supported by funds for faculty development generously provided by Eugene and Emily Grant, and by the Purchase College Foundation.

Faculty and Staff Footnotes is published by the Office of the President. Please email news items directly to Carrie.Bianchi@purchase.edu.