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The Language and Culture Program:
Minor in French and Courses

Minor in French
The minor in French is designed to provide the student with basic fluency in spoken and written French and to provide a general introduction to the culture and literature of France and the Francophone nations. Students interested in the minor should submit a completed Application for a Program of Minor Study to the School of Humanities main office. The student is assigned a minor advisor in French after consultation with the coordinator of the Language and Culture Board of Study.

Academic Requirements for the Minor in French
Five courses in French (20 credits), as follows:

  1. Two courses must be chosen from advanced-level French courses.
  2. One course must be in cultural studies.
  3. The remaining two courses must be chosen from various courses in French and in translation.


French Courses
1000–1999 (lower level, freshman)
2000–2999 (lower level, sophomore)
3000–3999 (upper level, junior)
4000–4999 (upper level, senior)

1000–1999:

Description revised Fall 2014 (4/11/14):
Beginning French I
FRE 1010
/ 4 credits / Fall
For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Presents the essential structures of spoken and written French by involving the student in situations that concretely represent the concepts of the language.

Description revised Fall 2014 (4/11/14):
Beginning French II
FRE 1020
/ 4 credits / Spring
A continuation of FRE 1010. Increased time is devoted to reading and writing. The development of oral skills remains the primary objective of the course.

Intensive Beginning French
FRE 1070
/ 4 credits / Summer (offered in France)
For students who have had little or no previous exposure to the language. Designed to help students quickly acquire the ability to negotiate their immediate surroundings using the French language. Elements of grammar and syntax are introduced, reviewed, and complemented by readings from newspapers and other sources relevant to everyday life. Taught in French, with emphasis on the spoken language.

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2000–2999:

Intermediate French I
FRE 2010
/ 4 credits / Fall
For students who are already familiar with the fundamentals of spoken and written French. Through a variety of written and oral assignments and exercises, students acquire a wider range of vocabulary, review basic structures, and become more comfortable interacting in spoken French. Students are encouraged to take risks and enjoy the adventure of language acquisition in an open and relaxed atmosphere.

Intermediate French II
FRE 2020
/ 4 credits / Spring
A continuation of FRE 2010. Concentrated work to help students acquire more nuanced vocabulary, with an introduction to slang. Students gain greater ease in reading through a variety of texts of increasing difficulty. The readings also serve as a basis for discussion, composition, and grammar review.

Intensive Intermediate French
FRE 2070
/ 4 credits / Summer (offered in France)
For students who are already familiar with the fundamentals of French; placement in FRE 2070 or 3070 is determined by a brief exam. Designed to help students quickly acquire the ability to negotiate their immediate surroundings using the French language. Elements of grammar and syntax are introduced, reviewed, and complemented by readings from newspapers and other sources relevant to everyday life. Taught in French, with emphasis on the spoken language.

Literature and the City
LIT 2675
Refer to Literature Courses: 1000–2999 for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 2675.

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3000–3999:

Advanced French I
FRE 3015
/ 4 credits / Fall
Offers a stress-free learning atmosphere to help students of French move toward fluency. Starting with a brief refresher on the basics through interactive situations in the classroom, students go on to invent situations, then perform, write about, and discuss them, increasing their command of the language and their comfort level in using it.
Prerequisite: FRE 2020 or permission of instructor

Advanced French II
FRE 3025
/ 4 credits / Spring
In this continuation of FRE 3015, readings, writing, and conversational exercises are used to improve fluency in the French language. A variety of media are used to stimulate discussions. To increase their comfort level and command of French, students invent dramatic situations in the classroom that they perform, analyze, discuss, and debate.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or permission of instructor

French Caribbean Literature
FRE 3067
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
A study of major developments in French Caribbean literature of the 19th through 21st centuries. This course focuses on questions of language, race, gender, geography, and class, with emphasis on local, regional, and global frames of reference.
Formerly also offered as LIT 3067 and LST 3067.

Intensive Advanced French
FRE 3070
/ 4 credits / Summer (offered in France)
For students who are already familiar with the fundamentals of French; placement in FRE 2070 or 3070 is determined by a brief exam. Uses material like television, magazines, newspapers, and literature to help students increase their knowledge of the language while introducing the various aspects of French life. Students also review and refine their knowledge of grammatical structures and work toward becoming familiar with idiomatic language and slang. Taught in French, with emphasis on the spoken language.

Discontinued (7/14/14):
Writing Workshop in French
FRE 3110
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
Focuses on developing a nuanced grasp of French structures and idioms through the student’s own writing. Students are introduced to a variety of writing styles in French, including descriptive narrative, journalistic prose, fiction, and the short essay.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or permission of instructor

Literature of the High Middle Ages
LIT 3160
Refer to Literature Courses: 3000–3999 for description.

The Renaissance in Europe
LIT 3220
Refer to Literature Courses: 3000–3999 for description.

Modern and Postcolonial France
HIS 3424
Refer to History Courses for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 3424.

An Introduction to Linguistics
SPA 3430
Refer to Spanish Courses for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 3430.

Surrealism and Its Legacy
LIT 3680
Refer to Literature Courses: 3000–3999 for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 3681.

Short Fiction in French
FRE 3705
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
An examination of the short fiction form, including novellas and stories, from tales of adventure to modern psychological fiction. The course begins with the realists, then moves through the surrealists, existentialists, and “nouveau roman” authors. Texts include works by Balzac, Nerval, Flaubert, Desnos, Camus, Sarraute, Colette, and Duras.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or equivalent

Classics of French Literature on Film
FRE 3710
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
How does the cinema adapt a text, and what are the questions underlying these semiological, ideological, or technical choices? Students read the literature (i.e., Cyrano de Bergerac, Madame Bovary) and view the films. Although this course is taught in English, the films are in French, and students who can read the literature in French are encouraged to do so.
Formerly also offered as LIT 3711.

Translation Theory
FRE 3730
/ 2 credits / Alternate years (Spring)
Students are introduced to the theory of translation, as it has developed over time and has dealt with questions from linguists, poets, anthropologists, and gender theorists. Taken in conjunction with FRE 3735.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or permission of instructor
Corequisite: FRE 3735

French Translation
FRE 3735
/ 2 credits / Alternate years (Spring)
Students produce, refine, evaluate, and reflect on translations from French to English and English to French. Particular emphasis on the translation of fiction and poetry. Taken in conjunction with FRE 3730.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or permission of instructor
Corequisite: FRE 3730

Discontinued (7/14/14):
Approaching French Literature I
FRE 3810
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
In this introduction to selected great texts in the French literary canon, the textualization of “Frenchness” is explored through close readings of such authors as Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Rabelais, Montaigne, Molière, Racine, and Pascal. Requirements include oral reports and written explications de texte as exercises in literary analysis. Taught in French.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or equivalent

Discontinued (7/14/14):
Approaching French Literature II
FRE 3820
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
A chronological continuation of FRE 3810, with emphasis on close readings of the modernists: Rousseau, Diderot, Voltaire, Sand, Flaubert, Stendhal, Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Proust, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and LeClezio. Taught in French.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or equivalent

French Cinema
CIN 3855
Refer to Cinema Studies Courses (School of Film and Media Studies) for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 3855.

Contemporary French Cinema
CIN 3857
Refer to Cinema Studies Courses (School of Film and Media Studies) for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 3857.

4000–4999:

Discontinued Fall 2014 (9/03/14):
Workshop in Translation: French
FRE 4110
/ 4 credits / Alternate years
Begins with a brief presentation of the theoretical aspects of translation, after which students become directly involved in translating both from English to French and from French to English. Literary texts representing a wide variety of styles are selected. Particular attention is given to idiomatic aspects of each language. Discussion in English and French.
Prerequisite: FRE 3015 or equivalent

Marcel Proust
LIT 4200
Refer to Literature Courses: 4000–4999 for description. Formerly also offered as FRE 4201.

Updated Sept. 3, 2014

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