The Liberal Studies Program: Social Sciences Courses

Note: It is expected that each course will be offered at least once during 2013–14 or 2014–15.

Anthropology
Business
Communications
Economics
Gender Studies
Legal Studies
Media, Society, and the Arts
Political Science
Social Sciences: General
Sociology

Anthropology Courses

Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
CAN 1500
Refer to ANT 1500 in Anthropology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Women Cross-Culturally
CAN 3140
/ 4 credits
An examination of some of the theoretical literature about gender and the debates concerning the position of women cross-culturally in both “simple” and complex societies.

Global Media, Local Cultures
CAN 3185
Refer to ANT 3185 in Anthropology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for CAN 3185.
Recommended: Prior background in anthropology

Masculinities: Feminist Perspectives
CAN 3705
Refer to SOC 3705 in Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for CAN 3705.

Body Art and Modification
CAN 3480
/ 4 credits
The body is adorned, manipulated, and modified in both Western and non-Western societies. Forms of alteration, which include dressing, body sculpture, plastic surgery, infibulation (piercing), cicatrization (scarification), and tattooing, are examined sociologically, culturally, and historically. The symbolic and mythic associations of body modification are also explored as mechanisms of social communication that help define aesthetic and cultural meanings and perceptions.

Business Courses

The Internet and Business
CBU 3060
/ 4 credits
Students examine the impact of the Internet on business and develop a solid foundation for evaluating current and future Internet business applications. Topics include Internet businesses; the impact of the Internet on traditional businesses, including Internet marketing, customer relationship management, and virtual workplaces; information businesses (music, software, movies, news); and global issues (outsourcing, offshoring).

Entrepreneurship/Business Planning
CBU 3120
/ 4 credits
The components of writing a successful business plan are explored. Topics include barriers to market entry and capital procurement, competitive analysis and strategic planning, market pricing and promotion, and management issues and other operational factors. The writing of an actual business plan is part of the process.

Industrial and Organizational Psychology
CBU 3140
Refer to BPS 3140 under Psychology in Natural Sciences Courses for description.

Refer to Communications Courses for:
CSS 2280 Public Speaking
CSS 3335 Management and Communication

Refer to Social Sciences General Courses for:
CSS 3735 Business Ethics

Communications Courses

Introduction to Mass Media and Communications
CSO 1540
/ 4 credits
The history and impact of communication technologies are examined, beginning with speech and moving forward through print and digital media, advertising and public relations, media regulation and potential, and ending with a consideration of the future.

Public Speaking
CSS 2280
/ 4 credits
Students develop expertise in public speaking by preparing and presenting different types of speeches for a variety of purposes. The focus is on the main elements of planning and delivering a speech: the message, the speaker, the audience, and the occasion. All speeches are critiqued in class. As an integral part of the course, students learn PowerPoint.

Film and Artistic Expression
CSS 3015
Refer to FTF 3015 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Women in Film
CSS 3040
Refer to FTF 3040 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Law and Film
CSS 3055
Refer to Legal Studies Courses for description.

American Film, Reflections of a Century I: 1900–1949
CSS 3075
Refer to FTF 3075 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

African American Cinema
CSS 3090
Refer to FTF 3090 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Subcultures in Film
CSS 3160
Refer to FTF 3160 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Film, Reflections of a Century II: 1950–1999
CSS 3175
Refer to FTF 3175 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The City on Film
CSS 3235
Refer to FTF 3235 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Horror Film
CSS 3260
Refer to FTF 3260 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Sports Films: Underdogs, Champions, and Gutter Balls
CSS 3265
Refer to FTF 3265 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Family on Film
CSS 3270
Refer to FTF 3270 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Film, Reflections of a Century III: The 21st Century
CSS 3275
Refer to FTF 3275 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Comedy Film
CSS 3280
Refer to FTF 3280 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Writing for the Mass Media
CSS 3305
Refer to AJO 3305 under Journalism in Humanities Courses for description.

Media Literacy
CSS 3315
Refer to AJO 3315 under Journalism in Humanities Courses for description.

Mass Media: A Cultural History
CSS 3325
/ 4 credits
An interdisciplinary (social science and humanities) course that emphasizes critical thinking in understanding the social and historical effects of mass media in the U.S. and throughout the world. This course begins in 19th-century America, when print media shaped and defined the national culture, and concludes in the current century with the mass-media convergence of print, electronic, and digital multimedia that is shaping and defining our global culture. Also offered as AHU 3325.

Management and Communication
CSS 3335
/ 4 credits
The roles and theories of communication and leadership, together with the skills and traits of effective managers, are studied. Students examine how managers use behavioral modification and motivation techniques, develop coaching skills, manage change and conflict, and create a vision for their employees. The topics of strategy, organizational culture, and diversity are also included.

Advanced Psychology of Communication
CSS 3369
Refer to BPS 3369 under Psychology in Natural Sciences Courses for description.

Contemporary Global Cinema

CSS 3400
Refer to CIN 3400 in Cinema Studies Courses (School of Film and Media Studies) for description. There is no prerequisite for CSS 3400.

History in Film
CSS 3550
Refer to FTF 3550 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Gender Expression in Film
CSS 3610
Refer to FTF 3610 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Human Rights Topics in Film
CSS 3615
Refer to FTF 3615 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Group Dynamics
CSS 3705
Refer to BPS 3705 under Psychology in Natural Sciences Courses for description.

The Great Directors
CSS 3750
Refer to FTF 3750 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The American Crime Film
CSS 3760
Refer to FTF 3760 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Romance, Love, and Sex on Film
CSS 3780
Refer to FTF 3780 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Economics Courses

Macroeconomic Theory I
CEC 1500
Refer to ECO 1500 in Economics Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for CEC 1500.

Microeconomics I: The Principles of Human Action
CEC 1510
Refer to ECO 1510 in Economics Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for CEC 1510.

Gender Studies Courses

Introduction to Gender and Sexuality
CGN 1200
Refer to GND 1200 in Gender Studies Courses (School of Liberal Arts and Sciences: Interdisciplinary Studies) for description.

American Women Writers
CGN 3665
Refer to LIT 3665 in Literature Courses: 3000–3999 (School of Humanities) for description.

Sociology of Gender
CSO 3610
Refer to Sociology Courses for description.

Gender and the Law
CSS 3727
Refer to Legal Studies Courses for description.

Legal Studies Courses

Note: Legal studies courses with CPO prefixes may be taken for political science credit, those with CSO prefixes for sociology credit, and those with CSS prefixes for general social sciences credit.

Arts and Entertainment Law
CAM 3170
Refer to Arts Management in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

American Constitutional Law
CPO 3050
Refer to POL 3050 in Political Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for CPO 3050.

Introduction to Criminal Law
CSO 1510
/ 4 credits
Topics include the structure of the criminal justice system; the impact of the Supreme Court on criminal justice; and the process of arrest, prosecution, and sentencing.

Introduction to Civil Law
CSO 1590
/ 4 credits
An exploration of the day-to-day applications of civil law: who can sue and be sued, the basis for lawsuits, and how to win cases. Through case studies and mock litigation, students explore such issues as product liability, medical malpractice, negligence, strict liability, and legal procedure, including document production and the use of expert witnesses.

Conflict Resolution
CSO 3010
/ 4 credits
An introduction to dispute resolution techniques (negotiation, mediation, arbitration) increasingly used in the courts as alternatives to the trial process and in schools and communities to resolve personal, social, and political conflicts. Procedures like mini-trials, early neutral evaluation, and settlement conferences are also covered. Students develop dispute-resolution skills while practicing in structured role-play.

Legal Research
CSO 3065
/ 4 credits
Students learn how to research the law and assess both its impact and effectiveness through research projects on the impact of law in a range of areas (e.g., consumer rights; the rights of women, students, minorities, and aliens; the rights of both the accused and the victims of crime).

The Supreme Court and Civil Liberties
CSO 3205
/ 4 credits
Focuses on major Supreme Court decisions pertaining to civil liberties. Cases dealing with the broad issue of privacy are examined, including those concerned with free speech, reproduction, and sexual preference. Students gain a better understanding of the current state of the law on major civil liberties issues and a better grasp of how Supreme Court decisions affect everyday life.

Anatomy of a Trial and the Jury Process
CSO 3210
/ 4 credits
Topics include the mechanism of the U.S. jury system; the truth-seeking process of juries; the concepts of mistrials, jury nullification, and hung juries; and a consideration of whether trial by jury is the best method for attaining justice. Students participate in a week-by-week mock trial, permitting hands-on experience in jury selection, opening statements, cross-examination, and summation.

Current Social Issues and the Law
CSO 3300
/ 4 credits
Focuses on current legal issues such as abortion, the death penalty, and affirmative action. The pivotal Supreme Court cases establishing the law in each area are read. In addition, research in sociology and psychology is examined to understand the conditions that led to the key court decisions and the impact of those decisions on society.

Juvenile Delinquency and the Law
CSO 3460
/ 4 credits
Examines the causes and controls of juvenile delinquency. Topics include a historical overview of children, their legal status, the evolution of the juvenile justice system, alternatives to incarceration and community-based solutions, and reform efforts. The effectiveness of prevention and deterrence efforts is evaluated.

Law and the Family
CSO 3475
/ 4 credits
The law touches everyone from conception to the grave and beyond. Family interactions between spouses, parents, children, and elders are dictated by rights and duties defined in the law. This course explores how the law weaves in and out of family structures in an attempt to protect and preserve certain rights and values.

Censorship: Sociological and Legal Perspectives
CSO 3481
/ 4 credits
Sociologists have long understood that the study of censorship can yield an understanding of the structure and values of a society. Modern societies define and enforce limits on expression by defining certain forms of expression as “obscene,” “pornographic,” “subversive,” etc. Censorship in film, literature, and theatre is the major focus.

Crime and Delinquency
CSO 3550
/ 4 credits
Crime and delinquency are analyzed as social phenomena, and their relationship to various social institutions is examined. Students are also given an overview of the theories of crime causation, as well as the nature and role of the police, courts, and prisons in society.

Sexual Assault: The Courts and Society Today
CSO 3655
/ 4 credits
Students examine the different types of sexual assault; the effects on victims, their families, and society; and the legal process unique to sexual assault prosecutions. Topics include legal protection for special victims; motivation of criminals; date rape, domestic violence, and battered women’s syndrome; and crimes against children. The roles of investigators, doctors, forensic scientists, district attorneys, judges, experts, and psychological counselors are also analyzed.

The Law and Film
CSS 3055
/ 4 credits
An examination of how law functions (or malfunctions), using contemporary films to illustrate the U.S. criminal justice system. Students review a series of films and compare them to literature and contemporary realities. Topics include arrest, interrogation, and the right to an attorney; preparation for trial and jury selection; the conduct of a trial, including opening statements, examinations and cross-examinations of witnesses, and sentencing; and imprisonment. Also offered as FTF 3055.

Cyberspace Law
CSS 3375
/ 4 credits
The existence of the Internet has significantly changed the way people live and work and has presented interesting legal questions and challenges. This course examines some of these questions, ranging from what it means to click on an “I Agree” button to where one “is” (in legal terms) on the Internet. Topics include privacy issues, cybercrime, and recent case law.

Environmental Law
CSS 3385
/ 4 credits
U.S. environmental law and policy, the common-law foundations of environmental law, and the regulatory process and toolkit are examined. The focus is on major environmental statutes: the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, the Compensation and Recovery Act (Superfund), and the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Immigration Law
CSS 3390
/ 4 credits
Issues related to immigration law are placed in context by reviewing their historical evolution. Students examine current law and issues related to family and labor-based petitions for permanent residence, political asylum and refugee applications, the status of undocumented workers, immigration and national security, and deportation policies and procedures.

Law, Order, and Disobedience
CSS 3420
/ 4 credits
Protection of civil rights in the U.S. has been characterized by both civil disobedience and widespread violence. This course analyzes milestones in American history, periods of unrest, and the sociolegal changes associated with them. Landmark constitutional cases, law, and justice in U.S. culture are studied, and historical lawbreakers and high-profile dissidents are examined through various media.

White-Collar Crime
CSS 3530
/ 4 credits
White-collar criminality, the law of economic crime, and political crimes associated with white-collar crime are investigated through the lens of class and privilege. Students compare traditional and white-collar crimes, including organized crime, and associated prosecutions such as conspiracy, mail fraud, racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations (RICO), money laundering, corporate criminal liability, and fraud upon financial institutions and against the government.

Gender and the Law
CSS 3727
/ 4 credits
Focuses on the evolution of the law in regard to gender-related issues, including sexual harassment in the workplace, gender discrimination in employment, and reproductive rights. Readings include key Supreme Court cases that have shaped the law concerning gender. A background in law is not required.

Capital Punishment in America
CSS 3729
/ 4 credits
An examination of the historical, moral, and legal issues surrounding the death penalty. Students confront the major controversial issues in the current death penalty debate and learn to form arguments from both the pro– and anti–death penalty perspectives. Topics include retribution, deterrence, proportionality, discrimination, error, and public opinion. Students analyze Supreme Court decisions and scholarly treatments of capital punishment.

Law, Ethics, and the Media
CSS 3755
Refer to AHU 3755 under Humanities: General in Humanities Courses for description.

Media, Society, and the Arts Courses

Introduction to Media Studies
CMA 1050
Refer to MSA 1050 in Media, Society, and the Arts Courses (School of Film and Media Studies) for description.

Political Science Courses

Introduction to U.S. Politics
CPO 1570
Refer to POL 1570 in Political Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

American Constitutional Law
CPO 3050
Refer to POL 3050 in Political Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for CPO 3050.

America at the Movies
CPO 3156
Refer to AHI 3156 under History in Humanities Courses for description.

The Nature and Function of Law
CPO 3185
/ 4 credits
The study of law from a liberal arts perspective, emphasizing the role that law and the legal order play in the institutional arrangements and human relations of a society. The course examines the basic concepts, language, institutions, and forms of law that characterize the American legal order.

Social Sciences: General Courses

Note: Courses with CSS prefixes that are listed under Communications or Legal Studies may be taken for general social sciences credit.

Health Issues in the 21st Century
CSS 3005
/ 4 credits
Health issues in the 21st century are presented from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include the origins of emerging health and related public policy issues; the impact on the local, national, and global economy and educational systems; national security; preventive efforts; and approaches to planning policy that address these health challenges now and in the future.

Music and Cultural Identity
CSS 3073
Refer to EMT 3073 under Music in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Women for Change in the Middle East
CSS 3077
Refer to AHU 3077 under Humanities: General in Humanities Courses for description.

Substance Abuse and Addiction
CSS 3130
/ 4 credits
What contributes to addictive personalities and behaviors related to alcohol and/or chemical dependency? Through lectures, independent research, and special events, students learn about systems of treatment and the critical judgments involved in referrals, gain an understanding of addiction and the resulting behaviors, and evaluate the impact of these behaviors on the family, society, and self.

Modernism, Media, and the Middle Class
CSS 3180
/ 4 credits
Charles Morazé, in The Triumph of the Middle Classes, describes the political and social history of the bourgeoisie during the 19th century. This course traces themes from Morazé through the 20th century, with attention to how the middle class sees itself through art, literature, film, advertising, and television. Also offered as AHU 3180.

The Politics of Green
CSS 3383
/ 4 credits
Political ecology is an interdisciplinary discipline that connects politics and economy to problems of environmental control and ecological change. This course examine the essentials of political ecology: its history and emergence, its conceptual and methodological challenges, major questions that it has answered to varying degrees, and major challenges that face the field now and in the future.

Contemporary Global Cinema
CSS 3400
Refer to CIN 3400 in Cinema Studies Courses (School of Film and Media Studies) for description. There is no prerequisite for CSS 3400.

American Music: A Cultural History
CSS 3470
Refer to EMU 3470 under Music in Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

The Politics of American Education
CSS 3507
/ 4 credits
Designed to familiarize students with the political foundations of education in the U.S. in historical, philosophical, and social context. This course covers the historical development of the political education system in the U.S., current political and legal trends in education policy, and problems and choices facing education in the future.

New York City: Society in Literature
CSS 3630
Refer to ALI 3060 under Literature in Humanities Courses for description.

Business Ethics
CSS 3735
/ 4 credits
Students learn how to integrate ethics with business practices by examining case studies and theories. Confronting ethical dilemmas in the workplace is an experience that affects individuals, organizations, communities, and the environment. Civic- and social-responsibility practices and policies are examined, demonstrating how integrity and moral sensibility can be a part of everyday professional and civic decision making.

Senior Capstone
CSS 4800
/ 4 credits
An intensive research and writing course, completed on the Purchase campus and culminating in a significant biographical research paper. Required for all liberal studies students. Also offered as AHU 4800.

Sociology Courses

Note: Courses with CSO prefixes that are listed under Communications or Legal Studies may be taken for sociology credit.

Introduction to Sociology
CSO 1500
Refer to SOC 1500 in Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Contemporary Popular Culture
CSO 3160
Refer to AHU 3160 under Humanities: General in Humanities Courses for description.

Research Methods
CSO 3405
Refer to SOC 3405 in Sociology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Racial Inequalities
CSO 3430
/ 4 credits
Given the ethnic complexity of society, major social institutions—including education, criminal justice, health care, social services, and business—face many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and future of race and ethnicity in American society, and how immigration, culture, religion, education, and income play parts in prejudice, discrimination, and racial inequalities.

Psychology of Personal and Social Change
CSO 3525
Refer to BNS 3525 under Natural Sciences: General in Natural Sciences Courses for description.

Sociology of the Family
CSO 3605
/ 4 credits
The intersections between families and other U.S. social institutions, with emphasis on recent social/political debates about the meaning of the family. Examines issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexualities, and connections between these issues and the experiences and understandings of family life. Other topics include previous U.S. family forms, historical relationships between the government and families, and current economic stresses, especially tensions between work and family life.

Sociology of Gender
CSO 3610
/ 4 credits
Students investigate how gender interfaces with the media, the family, and other social institutions. Readings and discussions examine the organization and meaning of gender in contemporary society. Topics include gender theory, sexuality, the meaning of transgender, and the organization of gender in different cultures.

Studies in Victimology
CSO 3650
/ 4 credits
Focuses on the central character in a criminal act—the victim. Objectives include understanding victimization and learning how to offer a victim real help. Diverse reactions are analyzed and various forms of practical help are examined. Special attention is given to such crimes as sexual assault and the various categories of abuse (child, adolescent, elder, parental, and spousal), and to the survivors of homicide victims.

Arrow up icon | << School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education home