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College Catalog:
2016–18


Contents

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Home / College Catalog / 2016-18 / Academic Programs / Liberal Studies & Continuing Education

PURCHASE COLLEGE CATALOG 2016–18
Draft in progress


The Liberal Studies Program: Natural Sciences Courses

Note: It is expected that each course will be offered at least once during 2016–17 or 2017–18.

Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Environmental Studies
Mathematics
Natural Sciences: General
Psychology

Biology Courses

Human Anatomy and Physiology I: Anatomy and Physiology
BIO 1510
Refer to Biology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II: Physiology and Nutrition
BIO 1520
Refer to Biology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

General Biology I
BIO 1550
Refer to Biology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

General Biology I Lab
BIO 1551
Refer to Biology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

General Biology II
BIO 1560
Refer to Biology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Chemistry Courses

General Chemistry I
CHE 1550
Refer to Chemistry Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

General Chemistry I Lab
CHE 1551
Refer to Chemistry Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

General Chemistry II
CHE 1560
Refer to Chemistry Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

General Chemistry II Lab
CHE 1561
Refer to Chemistry Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Computer Science Courses

Creating Web Documents
MAT 2730
/ 4 credits
Interactive online media like the World Wide Web have revolutionized the way people communicate. Students who are familiar with computers and the internet are introduced to tools and techniques for creating interactive documents. Topics include HTML authoring, Cascading Style Sheets, scripting languages, interaction techniques, data retrieval, and incorporating sound, video, and images in documents.

Programming for Visual Artists
NME 1450
Refer to New Media Courses (School of Film and Media Studies) for description.

Environmental Studies Courses

Introduction to Environmental Science
ENV 1500
Refer to Environmental Studies Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

World of Weather:
Introduction to Meteorology and Global Weather Patterns
ENV 1600
/ 4 credits
An introduction to the basic concepts of meteorology: radiation budget, weather elements, atmospheric stability, general circulation, frontal systems, surface and upper-air weather maps, and the basics of weather forecasting. Students are also introduced to modern weather display systems using audiovisual support (e.g., computer-generated graphics and internet weather services).

The World Beneath the Waves: Exploring Physical Oceanography
ENV 1610
/ 4 credits
An exploratory course for nonscience students that examines physical aspects of the world’s oceans and the role of the oceans in the earth-atmosphere-ocean system. Topics include the history of the science of oceanography, geomorphology and topography of the ocean bottom, continental drift, sedimentation, physical and chemical properties of sea water, ocean heat budget, surface currents, and coastal processes.

The Politics of Green
ENV 3180
/ 4 credits
Political ecology is an interdisciplinary discipline that connects politics and economy to problems of environmental control and ecological change. This course examine the essentials of political ecology: its history and emergence, its conceptual and methodological challenges, major questions that it has answered to varying degrees, and major challenges that face the field now and in the future.

Mathematics Courses

Mathematics for Contemporary Life
MAT 1060
Refer to Mathematics/Computer Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Precalculus
MAT 1150
Refer to Mathematics/Computer Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Calculus I
MAT 1500
Refer to Mathematics/Computer Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Calculus II
MAT 1510
Refer to Mathematics/Computer Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Introductory Statistics
MAT 1600
Refer to Mathematics/Computer Science Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Natural Sciences: General Courses

The Search for Life in the Universe
BIO 1600
/ 4 credits
Explore the nature of life, examine the history of life on Earth, look for life among the rocky planets and icy moons of our solar system, hunt for extrasolar planets, and join in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Are we alone in the universe?

Can Cancer Be Prevented?
BIO 1750
/ 4 credits
A study of cancer and possible cancer prevention strategies with a focus on modern scientific inquiry. Topics include the scientific method, analysis, and critical thinking; critical reading of various sources of scientific information; and the cellular properties, oncogenes, metastasis, causes, and prevention of cancer.

Should I Eat That?: The Science of Food Safety
CHE 1650
/ 4 credits
People deal with food safety on a daily basis; it affects how long they cook meat, whether they eat raw cookie batter, and if they eat food that has fallen on the floor. Students examine microbial and chemical agents that contaminate the food supply, learn practical considerations for preventing food contamination, and explore the politics of food regulation.

Psychology Courses

Social Psychological Theory Applied Through Film
CMS 3090
Refer to Film/Media Studies under Performing and Visual Arts Courses for description.

Introduction to Psychology
PSY 1530
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Social Psychology
PSY 2170
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Sensation and Perception
PSY 2250
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Behavioral Statistics
PSY 2320
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Drugs and Behavior
PSY 2350
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Adolescent Psychology
PSY 2500
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Child Development
PSY 2650
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Abnormal Psychology
PSY 2870
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Psychological Perspectives on the Self
PSY 3120
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Adult Development
PSY 3125
/ 4 credits
Focusing on the longest phase of the life cycle, adulthood, this course examines the developmental processes from the transition to adulthood through old age. Students explore current theories regarding development and examine current research on adults’ capabilities and changes over time, adaptive responses to continuous changes in life, and reciprocal influences of the environment and development.

Religion and Psychology
PSY 3140
/ 4 credits
In this study of psychology in relation to religion, students explore the definition of religion, its personal meaning to people, and its social and political meaning in the community. The importance of ritual is discussed, and conversion is examined to understand its meaning. The middle of the course focuses on such theorists as Freud, Jung, and Maslow and the role religion played in their theories. Finally, the role religion and culture play in psychotherapy and the difference between religions and cults are examined.

Educational Psychology
PSY 3150
/ 4 credits
Psychological themes, together with cognitive and social-emotional development, are studied in the context of the education environment. Emphasis is on the role of emotional climate in the classroom and its overall relationship to learning. Student variability (e.g., attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders) is evaluated. Sociological and legal issues pertinent to today’s classroom are also examined.

Psychology and the Media
PSY 3245
/ 4 credits
The media profoundly affect how humans understand themselves and the world in which they live, and their cognition, emotion, socialization, and behavior. Students examine the application of psychological principles throughout several forms of media, including news, advertising, educational and public information, social media, and entertainment. Implications for consumers, educators, children, parents, and individuals are also considered.

Multiple Intelligences
PSY 3260
/ 4 credits
The theory of multiple intelligences suggests that there are several distinct forms of intelligence. This course examines the initial interest in interspecies differences, followed by a critical look at the use of intelligence tests as classification tools and predictors of academic success. Students explore different forms of intelligence and ways of teaching children, and work with schoolchildren to study one form of intelligence.

Health Psychology
PSY 3301
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Psychology of Aging
PSY 3315
/ 4 credits
Based on changes occurring throughout life-span developmental psychology, this course evaluates what is myth, stereotype, potential, and reality about old age. Students examine the theoretical and empirical developments in such areas as psychosocial functioning, including identity and personality development; cultural norms and expectations, including role and status changes; physical and intellectual change; death and dying; and health nutrition.

Developmental Psychology
PSY 3350
/ 4 credits
A study of human development from infancy through childhood, with particular emphasis on social interaction, cognition, language, play, and representational activity.

Advanced Psychology of Communication
PSY 3365
/ 4 credits
This course focuses on understanding communication in relationships (interpersonal) and within the mind (intrapsychic: thinking, alone time, analyzing, understanding the external world and how one communicates internally). Topics include communication styles and communication in the intimate relationship, within the family, and at the workplace.

Personality Assessment
PSY 3690
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Counseling and Psychotherapy
PSY 3730
/ 4 credits
A study of the basic theories and their applications in counseling and psychotherapy. Theories studied include behavior therapy; drug therapy; interpersonal psychotherapy; psychoanalysis; and group, art, movement, and the “newer” therapies. Variations on the above as applied to different clinical populations are emphasized, as are issues of research and ethics in counseling and psychotherapeutic practice.

Psychology of Personality
PSY 3760
Refer to Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Psychology of Personal and Social Change
SOC 3055
Refer to Sociology under Social Sciences Courses for description.

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School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education

Faculty


Liberal Studies Degree Completion Program

Majors:

Communications, BS

Liberal Studies, BA

Liberal Studies: Arts, BA

Liberal Studies: Legal Studies, BA


Professional Certificate Programs:

Arts Management
Early Childhood Development


Undergraduate Courses:

Humanities
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
Performing & Visual Arts


Related Information:

Enrollment Policies (matriculated students)

Tutorials & Independent Studies

International & Study Abroad Programs

Undergraduate Core Curriculum/General Education