The Liberal Studies Program: Natural Sciences Courses

Note: It is expected that each course will be offered at least once during 2013–14 or 2014–15.

Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Environmental Studies
Mathematics
Natural Sciences: General
Psychology

Biology Courses

Human Anatomy and Physiology
BBI 1510
/ 4 credits / Summer
Introduction to the organ systems of the human body, including the neuromuscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and digestive systems. The physiological mechanisms of adaptation to exercise are also considered.

Human Physiology and Nutrition
BBI 1520
/ 4 credits / Summer
Introduction to the human body, emphasizing general physiological processes. The body is studied from the viewpoint of homeostasis, concentrating on the relationship of food to the functioning living organism in health and disease. Topics of current interest, controversies, and myths are highlighted. BBI 1510 is not a prerequisite for BBI 1520.

General Biology I
BBI 1550
/ 4 credits / Summer
Introduction to contemporary biology, covering cell structure and function, genetics, development, and molecular biology. This course is intended for science majors and premedical students; students with limited high school science and mathematics can satisfy college distribution requirements with other course options. General Biology I and II may be taken in either order.
Corequisite for Purchase College premedical students, biology majors, biochemistry majors, and environmental studies majors: BIO 1551

General Biology I Lab
BBI 1551
/ 1.5 credits / Summer
Lab exercises on cell organization, cell division, genetics, enzyme kinetics, photosynthesis, and development, and the use of light microscopes, spectrophotometer, and chromatography. Required for Purchase College premedical students, biology majors, biochemistry majors, and environmental studies majors.

General Biology II
BBI 1560
/ 4 credits / Summer
Introduction to contemporary biology, covering plant and animal morphology and physiology, ecology, behavior, and evolution. This course is intended for science majors and premedical students; students with limited high school science and mathematics can satisfy college distribution requirements with other course options. General Biology I and II may be taken in either order.
Corequisite for Purchase College premedical students, biology majors, and environmental studies majors: BIO 1561

General Biology II Lab
BBI 1561
/ 1.5 credits / Summer
Vertebrate anatomy and physiology, and examination of selected plant and animal phyla through lab exercises, experiments, and field trips. Required for Purchase College premedical students, biology majors, and environmental studies majors.

Chemistry Courses

General Chemistry I
BCH 1550
/ 4 credits / Summer
The principles and applications of chemistry. Topics include the development of an atomic/molecular model, stoichiometry, interaction of light with matter, and the physical behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. The lab is optional.
Prerequisite: High school algebra or its equivalent

General Chemistry I Lab
BCH 1551
/ 1 credit / Summer
Basic techniques in synthetic and analytical chemistry. Students must bring a $5 security deposit for their lab drawer key to the first class.
Corequisite: BCH 1550

General Chemistry II
BCH 1560
/ 4 credits / Summer
A continuation of BCH 1550. Topics include chemical kinetics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, acids and bases, and the chemistry of representative elements. The lab is optional.
Prerequisite: BCH 1550

General Chemistry II Lab
BCH 1561
/ 1 credit / Summer
Basic techniques in analytical and synthetic chemistry. Students must bring a $5 security deposit for their lab drawer key to the first class.
Corequisite: BCH 1560

Computer Science Courses

Computer Science I
BMA 1520
/ 4 credits
An introduction to problem solving, using computers. Emphasis is on programming, including the study of syntax, semantics, logical structures, graphics, and object-oriented programming. General topics of algorithm development, formulating problems, finding methods for computer solutions, differences among computer languages, and trends in the industry are also discussed. Experience is acquired through hands-on labs and several programming assignments.

Creating Web Documents
BMA 2730
/ 4 credits
Interactive online media like the World Wide Web have revolutionized the way people communicate. Students who are familiar with computers and the Internet are introduced to tools and techniques for creating interactive documents. Topics include HTML authoring, Cascading Style Sheets, scripting languages, interaction techniques, data retrieval, and incorporating sound, video, and images in documents.

Environmental Studies Courses

World of Weather:
Introduction to Meteorology and Global Weather Patterns
BEN 1100
/ 4 credits
An introduction to the basic concepts of meteorology: radiation budget, weather elements, atmospheric stability, general circulation, frontal systems, surface and upper-air weather maps, and the basics of weather forecasting. Students are also introduced to modern weather display systems using audiovisual support (e.g., computer-generated graphics and Internet weather services).

Introduction to Environmental Science
BEN 1500
/ 4 credits
A survey of the physical, biological, and cultural dimensions of current and past environmental problems. The nature of scientific inquiry and principles that apply to the study of the environment are covered, with emphasis on developing facility in interpreting environmental data.

The World Beneath the Waves:
Exploring Physical Oceanography
BEN 1545
/ 4 credits
An exploratory course for nonscience students that examines physical aspects of the world’s oceans and the role of the oceans in the earth-atmosphere-ocean system. Topics include the history of the science of oceanography, geomorphology and topography of the ocean bottom, continental drift, sedimentation, physical and chemical properties of sea water, ocean heat budget, surface currents, and coastal processes.

Mathematics Courses

Mathematics for Contemporary Life
BMA 1060
Refer to MAT 1060 in Mathematics Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Precalculus
BMA 1150
Refer to MAT 1150 in Mathematics Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: Math fluency

Calculus I
BMA 1500
/ 4 credits
The basic concepts of the differential and integral calculus. Focus is on the applicability of these topics to an array of problems.
Prerequisite: BMA 1150 or equivalent

Calculus II
BMA 1510
/ 4 credits
A continuation of BMA 1500. Topics include differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions; techniques of integration; arc length; infinite series; and improper integrals. Applications include work, growth, and decay problems and volumes of solids of revolution.
Prerequisite: BMA 1500 or equivalent

Statistics
BNS 2400
Refer to Natural Sciences: General Courses for description.

Natural Sciences: General Courses

The Search for Life in the Universe
BNS 1120
/ 4 credits
Explore the nature of life, examine the history of life on Earth, look for life among the rocky planets and icy moons of our solar system, hunt for extrasolar planets, and join in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Are we alone in the universe?

Should I Eat That?: The Science of Food Safety
BNS 1300
/ 4 credits
People deal with food safety on a daily basis; it affects how long they cook meat, whether they eat raw cookie batter, and if they eat food that has fallen on the floor. Students examine microbial and chemical agents that contaminate the food supply, learn practical considerations for preventing food contamination, and explore the politics of food regulation.

Astronomy: Exploring the Universe
BNS 2050
/ 4 credits
Using the theory of stellar structure and evolution as a springboard, students explore other aspects of astronomy, like planet formation, the origin of elements, interstellar matter, and the structure and nature of galaxies and quasars. The observational basis of astronomy and its relationship to currently accepted theories are emphasized. Because astronomy is an exact science, some quantitative investigations are required.

Statistics
BNS 2400
/ 4 credits
This introduction to data analysis includes both descriptive and inferential statistics. Descriptive statistics covers introductory data analysis and measures of central tendency, dispersion, and association. Inferential statistics covers probability, hypothesis testing, sampling, and population distribution and their use in conducting T-tests and one-way ANOVAs. The theory and technique of linear regression and its applications, forecasting, and discriminant analysis are also presented. Some statistical applications are explored in an on-campus computer lab during class hours.
Prerequisite: High school algebra or equivalent

Social Psychological Theory Applied Through Film
BNS 3450
Refer to FTF 3450 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses.

Psychology of Personal and Social Change
BNS 3525
/ 4 credits
Focuses on personal development by exploring theoretical foundations of and practical techniques for the integration of body, mind, and spirit. Self-awareness skills are enhanced, and strategies that facilitate personal growth within the contexts of family, community, and the world are examined. Students study mainstream psychological theory and practice, as well as Eastern and Western philosophical and spiritual traditions, using didactic, interactive, and experiential modalities. Also offered as CSO 3525.

Psychology Courses

Introduction to Psychology
BPS 1530
Refer to PSY 1530 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. BPS 1530 is not a prerequisite for upper-level psychology courses offered by the School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education (i.e., those with BPS prefixes), unless noted in the course description.

Behavioral Statistics
BPS 2320
Refer to PSY 2320 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for BPS 2320.

Drugs and Behavior
BPS 2350
Refer to PSY 2350 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Adolescent Psychology
BPS 2500
Refer to PSY 2500 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.

Child Development
BPS 2650
Refer to PSY 2650 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. BPS 2650 may serve as a prerequisite for upper-level developmental psychology courses. Credit will not be given for both BPS 2650 and BPS 3350.

Abnormal Psychology
BPS 3100
Refer to PSY 3100 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for BPS 3100.

Psychological Perspectives on the Self
BPS 3120
Refer to PSY 3120 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for BPS 3120.

Sports Psychology
BPS 3130
Refer to PSY 3130 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: BPS 1530 or equivalent

Industrial and Organizational Psychology
BPS 3140
/ 4 credits
An introduction to the scientific study and professional application of psychological concepts and principles to the workplace. Students explore the science and practice of industrial and organizational psychology in all phases of working life, including job analysis, selection, training and development, performance management, organizational development, teamwork, motivation, work stress, and leadership. Also offered as CBU 3140.

Religion and Psychology
BPS 3245
Refer to AHU 3245 under Humanities: General in Humanities Courses for description.

Health Psychology
BPS 3300
/ 4 credits
An introduction to the theoretical and clinical foundations of the emerging field of health psychology. Explores contemporary approaches to the promotion of health and well-being from a multidisciplinary framework and sociocultural perspectives. Topics include co-morbidity factors (depression, anxiety) as they affect health outcomes; obstacles to health promotion, such as nonadherence; and quality of life with respect to chronic medical and mental health problems.

Cross-Cultural Psychology
BPS 3301
Refer to PSY 3300 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: BPS 1530 or equivalent

Cognitive Development
BPS 3345
Refer to PSY 3345 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description. There is no prerequisite for BPS 3345.

Developmental Psychology
BPS 3350
/ 4 credits
A study of human development from infancy through childhood, with particular emphasis on social interaction, cognition, language, play, and representational activity. Because of their interchangeability, credit is not given for both BPS 3350 and PSY 2650/Child Development (offered by the School of Natural and Social Sciences).

Advanced Psychology of Communication
BPS 3369
/ 4 credits
This course focuses on understanding communication in relationships (interpersonal) and within the mind (intrapsychic: thinking, alone time, analyzing, understanding the external world and how one communicates internally). Topics include communication styles and communication in the intimate relationship, within the family, and at the workplace. Also offered as CSS 3369.

Social Psychological Theory Applied Through Film
BNS 3450
Refer to FTF 3450 under Film/Media Studies in Performing and Visual Arts Courses.

Educational Psychology
BPS 3460
/ 4 credits
Psychological themes, together with cognitive and social-emotional development, are studied in the context of the education environment. Emphasis is on the role of emotional climate in the classroom and its overall relationship to learning. Student variability (e.g., attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, autistic spectrum disorders) is evaluated. Sociological and legal issues pertinent to today’s classroom are also examined.

Psychology of Personal and Social Change
BNS 3525
Refer to Natural Sciences: General Courses for description.

Forensic Psychology
BPS 3540
/ 4 credits
Hone critical thinking and evaluative skills in examining data, evidence, and assumptions underlying the judicial process and the application of psychological principles. Study the research and clinical practice of forensic psychology in both civil and criminal law-enforcement settings. Examine the training, roles, and responsibilities of forensic psychologists along with methods of interrogation, criminal profiling, and investigation.

Psychology of Death and Dying
BPS 3550
/ 4 credits
Topics include attitudes toward the dying and the bereaved, the psychological stages of death, institutional settings of death and dying, insights from survivors of life-threatening illnesses or experiences, the impact of death on the individual and family, and the social functions of grief and mourning. Different types of death, death at different ages, euthanasia, and violent death are also examined.

Experimental Psychology
BPS 3551
Refer to PSY 3550 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: BPS or PSY 1530 and 2320 and a third course in psychology, with a grade of C+ or higher in each

Multiple Intelligences
BPS 3680
/ 4 credits
The theory of multiple intelligences suggests that there are several distinct forms of intelligence. This course examines the initial interest in interspecies differences, followed by a critical look at the use of intelligence tests as classification tools and predictors of academic success. Students explore different forms of intelligence and ways of teaching children, and work with schoolchildren to study one form of intelligence.

Personality Assessment
BPS 3690
Refer to PSY 3690 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: BPS 1530 or equivalent

Child Psychopathology
BPS 3720
/ 4 credits
Addresses early and profound deviations in infancy, childhood schizophrenia, and organic disturbances, as well as the theoretical work of Stern and Mahler on the concept of self. Other topics include depression and the consequences of loss, pathologies of initiative and early socialization, neurotic process and issues of excessive/inadequate control, mental retardation, neglect and abuse, and developmental issues around cultural/ethnic differences.

Counseling and Psychotherapy
BPS 3730
/ 4 credits
A study of the basic theories and their applications in counseling and psychotherapy. Theories studied include behavior therapy; drug therapy; interpersonal psychotherapy; psychoanalysis; and group, art, movement, and the “newer” therapies. Variations on the above as applied to different clinical populations are emphasized, as are issues of research and ethics in counseling and psychotherapeutic practice.

Psychology of Aging
BPS 3750
/ 4 credits
Based on changes occurring throughout life-span developmental psychology, this course evaluates what is myth, stereotype, potential, and reality about old age. Students examine the theoretical and empirical developments in such areas as psychosocial functioning, including identity and personality development; cultural norms and expectations, including role and status changes; physical and intellectual change; death and dying; and health nutrition.

Psychology of Personality
BPS 3760
Refer to PSY 3760 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: BPS 1530 or equivalent

Social Psychology
BPS 3860
Refer to PSY 3860 in Psychology Courses (School of Natural and Social Sciences) for description.
Prerequisite: BPS 1530 or equivalent or one sociology course

Arrow up icon | << School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education home