faculty

Faculty and Staff Footnotes

February–March 2013

Appointments, Awards, Grants, and Prizes
Conferences, Presentations, Panels, and Educational Programs
Publications
Recordings, Films, Exhibitions, Performances, and Media Appearances

Appointments, Awards, Grants, and Prizes

  • Jack Breslin, lecturer in communications and media studies (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), received the Hugh J. McCabe Award for Social Justice at Iona College’s May 2012 commencement for “his involvement in and constant encouragement of awareness for issues of social justice,” particularly taking students on three immersion trips to Africa. Breslin is a member of the mass communications faculty at Iona, where he has taught since 2001.
     
  • Lenora Champagne, professor of theatre and performance, will be in residence at the Bogliasco Foundation Liguria Study Center for a month between March and April, developing a project that responds to Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities.
     
  • Sharon Horvath, associate professor of art and design (painting/drawing), has received a Fulbright to India to complete her research project, “Ranj and Rasa: The Compression of Emotion and Sensuality through Color in Kangra Ragamala Paintings.” She will travel to India later this year (and into 2014) as a Fulbright-Nehru senior researcher.

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Conferences, Presentations, Panels, and Educational Programs

  • Zehra F.K. Arat, professor of political science, gave a talk on “Issues of Sustainability and Replicability of Progress in Women’s Rights,” at a panel on sustainable women’s rights, co-sponsored by the Women’s Platform of the Journalists and Writers Foundation and the Permanent Representative of Turkey to the United Nations. The panel was held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the UN Commission on the Status of Human Rights on March 5 in New York City.
     
  • Andrew Bernstein, lecturer in philosophy (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), participated in a debate with Dinesh D’Souza, “Is Christianity Good or Bad for Mankind?,” on February 8 at the University of Texas in Austin.
     
  • Lenora Champagne, professor of theatre and performance, gave a talk, “Into the Light,” on the work of playwright Maria Irene Fornes, for the Images of Women in American Literature study group on December 1, 2012, in Tokyo, Japan. The talk, sponsored by the Institute for Research in Language and Culture at Tsuda College, was part of Champagne’s 2012–13 Fulbright activities.
     
  • Judith Dupré, lecturer in writing and humanities (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), will present a lecture, “Opening Your Eyes to This Place,” on April 10 at Fairfield University, in conjunction with the university’s Cities initiative, a two-year, multidisciplinary investigation of urban issues.
     
  • Jan Robert Factor, professor of biology, attended a lecture at the Norwalk Maritime Center given by Sylvia Earle, a pioneer in underwater exploration who has worked with National Geographic for many years. Factor attended the lecture with a group of students from Coral Reef Biology and Ecology, his winter-term course held in Roatan, Costa Rica. After the lecture, they had the opportunity to meet Earle and tell her about their experiences in Roatan, where she was instrumental in establishing a marine sanctuary. The students were also interviewed by a film crew working on a documentary about Earle, and had their scuba certification cards autographed by Earle.
     
  • Gerard Hecht, associate professor of music, was invited by renowned opera star Cynthia Haymon to give a master class in opera arias and art song literature at the School of Music, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where Haymon is a faculty member. Hecht worked with nine students during a three-hour class, emphasizing foreign language diction and role interpretation. Approximately 75 students and faculty attended, and Hecht has been invited to return next semester.
     
  • Maria Guralnik, assistant professor of arts management, presented on a panel devoted to teaching community engagement at the annual Association of Arts Administration Educators conference, March 7–9, in New Orleans. Her presentation focused on the intersection of arts advocacy and community engagement. Panelists include Doug Borwick, author of Building Communities, Not Audiences: The Future of the Arts in the United States. Guralnik also recently team-taught a distance learning seminar on arts finance and funding as part of the recently launched certified performing arts executive program (CPAE), offered by the graduate program in arts administration at the University of New Orleans in association with Arts Northwest and the National Association of Performing Arts Managers and Agents (NAPAMA).
     
  • Stuart Isacoff, lecturer in music, made six presentations in February and March: “Classical-Jazz Connections” lecture/recital on February 8 at the Metropolitan State University of Denver; “A Natural History of the Piano” lecture/recital on February 28 at the Jacobs School of Music, Indiana University; lectures on “The Art of Ravel,” “Celebrating Debussy,” and “Understanding Impressionism” on March 3–5 at the Miami Piano Festival; and a teacher workshop on “A Natural History of the Piano” at the Steinway Piano Gallery in Paramus, N.J.
     
  • Mary Kosut, associate professor of media, society, and the arts, was invited to present a public talk on her current research, “Artification: Human Bodies and Honey Bees,” on March 6 at Montserrat School of Art in Beverly, Mass. She also participated in the “In Conversation” discussion series with Leonie Bradbury, curator and director of Monserrat Gallery, on the intersection between video and performance art and the current exhibition Absent/Present, featuring Kate Gilmore, assistant professor of art and design, and Zsuzsanna Szegedi. And on February 15, Kosut presented a talk, “Honeybees Pollinating New York City: On the Material Cultures of an Insect,” with Lisa Jean Moore, professor of sociology and gender studies, at “Mattering: Feminism, Science and Materialism,” a CUNY Graduate Center conference.
     
  • Steve Lambert, assistant professor of new media, was a panelist at Flux Factory’s “Death Match,” a conversation on arts funding. He was also invited by Creative Time to participate on an artists’ Twitter panel, discussing “Forms of Life: Liam Gillick Decodes the World.”
     
  • Susan G. Letcher, assistant professor of environmental studies, presented a seminar, “Evolutionary history shapes ecological assembly rules: phylogenetic community structure during tropical forest succession,” at Binghamton University on March 8.
     
  • Cynthia Lin, assistant professor of art and design (painting/drawing), will participate in an artist panel discussion on April 10, held in conjunction with the exhibition Borderline: Depictions of Skin at Garis & Hahn in New York City.
     
  • Susanne Markgren, digital services librarian, participated in a panel session, “Demystifying the Hiring Process,” at the METRO Training Center on February 7 in New York City. The panel was co-sponsored by the New Librarians Discussion Group of ACRL/NY and METRO.
     
  • Jeanine Meyer, professor of mathematics/computer science and new media, participated in a workshop, “Origami and Math: We Fold Under Pressure,” on March 16 at the Explore Your Opportunities conference for 7th-grade girls, sponsored by the Westchester Branch of the American Association of University Women and College of Mount Saint Vincent.
     
  • Jason Pine, assistant professor of media, society, and the arts, gave three invited presentations in February and March: “Methlabs and Alchemical Ontology in the U.S. Heartland” on February 11 at the University of Texas at Austin’s Department of Anthropology; “Qualities of ‘Economic Performance’ in Alternative Economies” on February 21 at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City; and “Methlabs, Alchemical Ontology and Homespun Worlds,” on March 4 as part of the Social Anthropology Program Seminar Series at Harvard University.
     
  • Christopher Robbins, assistant professor of art and design (sculpture), gave two artist’s talks in March: “Design Paradigms + Practices” on March 19, at Parsons the New School for Design; and on March 28 at Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia. Robbins also participated in “Who gets to speak up? A candid conversation about collaboration and participation with Huong Ngo, Christopher Robbins, and Kerry Downe,” part of the conversation series “Fucking Up: Learning from Mistakes in Art and Education” at the Eyebeam Art and Technology Center.
     
  • Paul Siegel, assistant professor of psychology, and two Purchase alumni and former mentees, Richard Warren and Evan Scott, have had a study accepted as a poster presentation at the 25th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, to be held in May in Washington, D.C. The study is the first to show that exposure to phobic stimuli can reduce physiological fear responses without awareness.
     
  • Jeffrey Taylor, assistant professor of arts management, was a featured speaker at the Second Annual Summit to Success at Tiffin University (February 22–23). His presentation, “Bon Voyage: The Art of Making Your First Real Job a Global Experience,” was on international entrepreneurship.

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Publications

  • Eugene Callahan, lecturer in economics, published “Chicken Soup for the Out-of-Step Scholar’s Soul” with Peter Leeson in the American Journal of Economics and Sociology, November 2012.
     
  • Melissa Febos, lecturer in writing and literature (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), was interviewed by Guernica magazine on her dominatrix memoir, teaching sexuality in literature, and what it takes to make a great sex scene. She also completed a Valentine’s Day writeup for “Writers Recommend,” a column in Poets & Writers.
     
  • Stuart Isacoff, lecturer in music, has an article in the Wall Street Journal Book Review section (March 22), in which he highlights five of the best books about the musician in society.
     
  • George Keteku, lecturer in religious studies and African history (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), is the author of The Winner-Takes-All or a Proportional System? The Logic of Electoral System Preference in sub-Saharan Africa’s Democracies (Lambert Academic Publishing, November 2012). The book uses the comparative method to make the case that ruling elites, in selecting electoral laws, factor in sources of partisan conflict. Selected chapters of the book were presented at the African Studies Association (ASA) meeting in Philadelphia and at a conference in Baltimore of the Association of Scholars of Middle East and Africa (ASMEA) in 2012.
     
  • Mary Kosut, associate professor of media, society, and the arts, and Lisa Jean Moore, professor of sociology and gender studies, are co-authors of the book chapter “Bees, Borders, and Bombs: A Social Account of Weaponizing and Theorizing Bees,” published in Animals and War: Studies of Europe and North America, Ryan Hediger, ed. (Brill, December 2012).
     
  • Steve Lambert, assistant professor of new media, has two works included in the book BRIGHT! Typography Between Illustration and Art, Slanted c/o MAGMA Brand Design, ed. (DAAD Media, November 2012). In October 2012, Lambert published an essay with Purchase alum Stephen Duncombe, “An Open Letter to Critics Writing about Political Art,” which caused a bit of a stir, and in January 2013, he wrote about humor and served as a “conversation leader” on the weekly dialogue topic “Using humor to expose the ridiculous” for New Tactics in Human Rights.
     
  • Jeanine Meyer, professor of mathematics/computer science and new media, had three articles published in JsMag for JavaScript professionals: “Creating a Jigsaw Game” (March 2013), “Opening and Closing Windows” (February 2013), and “Chasing an Image” (January 2013).
     
  • Andrew Salomon, assistant professor of journalism, had an article, “Growth in Performance Capture Helping Gaming Actors Weather Slump,” published by Backstage on February 22.
     
  • R. David Seabrook, lecturer in business and economics (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), is working with the Harvard Business School and Harvard Business Publishing on their core curriculum project. Seabrook’s focus is on business strategy. The core curriculum project is a strategic new product line of course materials consisting of core readings, interactive illustrations, and simulations for a worldwide audience of business school students.
     
  • Paul Siegel, assistant professor of psychology, published an article in the journal Neuropsychoanalysis with Bradley Peterson, MD, director of the Center for Developmental Neuropsychiatry at the New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI) of Columbia University. The journal focuses on the dialogue that has burgeoned between neuroscience and psychoanalysis to integrate the insights of each discipline for a better understanding of the dynamic relationship between mind and brain. The article presented a novel fMRI paradigm for demonstrating dynamic conflict in individuals with phobias. Paul and Peterson are currently conducting an fMR study based on the paradigm in the Brain Imaging Lab at NYSPI.
     
  • Roger Tsai, lecturer in mathematics (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), has seen a surge of interest in his work on 3D geometric/robotics vision, computational vision, and data analytics, as reflected in the newest Google scholar data. As of February 18, the number of scholarly documents or Web links that reference his work has jumped to 10,509. Graduate students around the world continue working on topics inspired by his work, and university departments, such as the MIT Media Lab, have used his work as material for courses. Commercial companies such as Hunter Engineering Corp, Callaway Golf Company, and Matlab also use his work in improving products and instruments.
     
  • Jo Ann Walters, associate professor of art and design (photography), was recently interviewed by Michael Serra in Ahorn Magazine, issue 9 (Berlin, Germany). Ahorn Magazine, an online publication about contemporary photography, is dedicated to highlighting emerging photographers and an important platform for original written content, presenting interviews, essays, book reviews, and more. An image from Walters’ series Dog Town, “Prisoners cleaning the Great Mississippi River Road after the flood. Alton, Illinois 2008,” was published on January 30 by Prison Photography, an online publication concerned with the image, incarceration, representation, media, social justice, and responsible photography, edited by Peter Brooks of wired.com.

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Recordings, Films, Exhibitions, Performances, and Media Appearances

  • Matt Bollinger, visiting assistant professor of art and design (painting/drawing), has a solo exhibition, Bed on the Floor, on view from March 13 through April 28 at Galerie Zürcher in New York City.
     
  • Lenora Champagne, professor of theatre and performance, performed in The Record by 600 Highwaymen at the Invisible Dog Art Center in Brooklyn, February 13–16.
     
  • Edmund Cionek, lecturer in music history (School of Liberal Studies & Continuing Education), will moderate the 17th Annual Composer’s Forum, “Rhythm and Ritual,” this summer at the Bar Harbor Music Festival and attend the world premiere of his Rockin’ in Rhythm and Ritual by the piano-percussion duo Synchronicity. Forthcoming recordings include The Lullaby Project with the Ridgefield Symphony. He continues to be a member of the College Music Society National Advisory Board in Music Composition. Check out his website at edmundcionek.com.
     
  • Kate Gilmore, assistant professor of art and design (sculpture), has a solo exhibition, Kate Gilmore: Body of Work, on view at MOCA Cleveland from March 16 to June 9. In addition to the group exhibitions announced in the Jan. 2013 issue, Gilmore’s work is also included in the following this spring: Only as Signal Shown at Southern Exposure in San Francisco, Calif., Feb. 1–March 9; and No Sun without Shadow at Lu Magnus Gallery in New York City, February 27–March 2.
     
  • Susanna Heller, lecturer in art and design (painting/drawing), has a solo exhibition, Phantom Pain, on view March 15–April 20 at Magnan Metz Gallery in New York City.
     
  • Ryan Homsey, lecturer in music (studio composition), was a featured composer during a two-day new music festival, New Voices @ CUA, at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Twilight, his recent composition for female voices, cello, and piano, was performed by members of CUA’s Benjamin T. Rome School of Music and the Great Noise Ensemble on January 26. Audio/video footage from The Orpheus Variations, with music composed by Homsey, was part of a larger gallery exhibit, Um, Nenhum e Cem Mil (One, None, and a Hundred Thousand) by Joana Ricou, which opened January 15 and was extended to March 23 at Edge Arts in Lisbon, Portugal.
     
  • Aaron Krach, lecturer in art and design, was included in the group exhibition I Killed My Father, I Ate Human Flesh, I Quiver With Joy: An Obsession With Pier Paolo Pasolini, on view February 22–March 23 at Allegra LaViola Gallery in New York City. The exhibition was reviewed in The New York Times on March 7.
     
  • Steve Lambert, assistant professor of new media, participated in a group interview, “Pranks and Tricksters,” about the connection between art, pranks, and the role of the modern trickster. The discussion was broadcast on February 3 on Australian National Radio’s Future Tense program. He was also interviewed by Ilene Strizver on January 16 for CreativePro.com’s Type Talk blog: “Steve Lambert’s Typography for Social Change.”
     
  • John Lehr, assistant professor of art and design (photography), had a solo exhibition, John Lehr: Low Relief, on view February 22–March 23 at Kate Werble Gallery in New York City.
     
  • Cynthia Lin, assistant professor of art and design (painting/drawing), will be part of a three-person show, Borderline: Depictions of Skin, on view March 28–April 27 at Garis & Hahn in New York City. In addition, an exhibition of her work, Drawings of Skin, is currently featured in the upper lobby of the Performing Arts Center and will be on view through August.
     
  • Rachel Owens, assistant professor of art and design, has a show, Soft Edges, on view March 22–April 16 at Track 13 Gallery at the Behind Cummins Station in Nashville, Tenn. It is a pop-up presentation by ZieherSmith, the New York gallery that represents Owens. She also has a sculpture, Inveterate Composition for Clare (2011), installed at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville. It is on view March 18–August 1.
     
  • Ted Piltzecker, associate professor of music (studio composition), performed on March 1 in Atlanta at Steve’s Live Music with Tyrone Jackson on piano, Robert Dickson on bass, and Justin Chesarek on drums. He also performed with the same ensemble on March 3 for the Atlanta Lovers of Music Association (ALOMA) and gave a master class at Emory University on March 2.
     
  • Michael Torlen, associate professor emeritus of art and design (painting/drawing), had a solo show, Michael Torlen Seamarks: 2006–2012, on view February 12–28 at Fisher Hall Gallery at Horace Mann School in Riverdale, N.Y. The Miranda Arts Project Space in Port Chester, N.Y., also exhibited Torlen’s works in a group exhibition, Solidary/Solitary: The Artist at Work, February 16–March 16.
     
  • Sarah Walker, lecturer in art and design, has two solo exhibitions in New York City this spring: Drift, on view Jan. 23–March 3 at Artifact; and Planet X at Pierogi Gallery, on view March 22–April 21. Her work was also on display March 7–10 at the Pierogi Gallery booth at the Armory Show at Pier 94 and is included in a group exhibition, Approaching Infinity: The Richard Green Collection of Meticulous Abstraction, on view January 26–May 5 at the Crocker Museum of Art, Sacramento, Calif.

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Many of the above activities are supported by funds for faculty development generously provided by Eugene and Emily Grant, and by the Purchase College Foundation.

Faculty and Staff Footnotes is published by the Office of the President. Please email news items directly to Carrie.Bianchi@purchase.edu.