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Continuing Education - Undergraduate Credit
Courses

Spring 2015 Credit Courses: Social Science

Introduction to Mass Media and Communications
The history and impact of communication technologies are examined, beginning with speech and moving forward through print and digital media, advertising and public relations, media regulation and potential, and ending with a consideration of the future.
CMS1500 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
To be announced
Thurs., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 22–May 7
Room: Refer to the online schedule

American Film, Reflections of a Century I: 1900 to 1949
Early films depict the transition from the Victorian era to the Industrial Age, the birth of big cities, the suffragette movement, and the development of narrative cinema. Topics include World War I and the introduction of the propaganda film, the wild Jazz Age, the cynical gangster movies, the protest films of the Depression era, and the rise of escapist films.
CMS3130 / 4 credits
Michael Garber
Wed., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 21–May 6
Room: Refer to the online schedule

The Horror Film
Charts the transformations of one of the most stimulating and complex of film genres, the horror film, from its birth in the early 20th century to the present. Students study how the Hollywood horror film has evolved through the years in response to contemporary culture.
CMS3180 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Adam Resnick
Thurs., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 22–May 7
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Sports Films: Underdogs, Champions, and Gutter Balls
Examines the elements and messages in sports films that make people cheer for the underdog and care about teams, players, and sports. Using both big-budget Hollywood films and documentaries with a small scope, this course explores the ideas of team, sport, and athletics and investigates the grip that sports have on American culture.
CMS3290 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Grant Wiedenfeld
Wed., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 21–May 6
Room: Refer to the online schedule

The Politics of American Education
Designed to familiarize students with the political foundations of education in the U.S. in historical, philosophical, and social context. This course covers the historical development of the political education system in the U.S., current political and legal trends in education policy, and problems and choices facing education in the future.
POL3270 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Owen Borda
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 26–May 11
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Research Methods
Students become acquainted with methods that social scientists in general and sociologists in particular use for different types of research. Goals include learning to identify, understand, and evaluate diverse research strategies; distinguish between qualitative and quantitative methods, the types of knowledge they produce, and the strengths and the weaknesses of each; and think critically about objectivity, researcher standpoint, and research ethics.
SOC3405 / 4 credits
Audrey Sprenger
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 26–May 11
Room: Refer to the online schedule

hybrid courses iconRacial Inequalities
Given the ethnic complexity of society, major social institutions—including education, criminal justice, health care, social services, and business—face many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and future of race and ethnicity in American society, and how immigration, culture, religion, education, and income play parts in prejudice, discrimination, and racial inequalities.
Note: This course is a hybrid course (60 percent online and 40 percent in person). Classes meet on Jan. 22, Feb. 5 and 19, Mar. 12, April 9 and 30. Please visit www.purchase.edu/online for details.
SOC3415 / 4 credits
To be announced
Thurs., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 22–May 7
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Studies in Victimology
Focuses on the central character in a criminal act—the victim. Objectives include understanding victimization and learning how to offer a victim real help. Diverse reactions are analyzed and various forms of practical help are examined. Special attention is given to such crimes as sexual assault and the various categories of abuse (child, adolescent, elder, parental, and spousal), and to the survivors of homicide victims.
SOC3575 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
To be announced
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Jan. 26–May 11
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Updated Dec. 4, 2014

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