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Continuing Education - Undergraduate Credit
Courses

Fall 2014 Credit Courses: Philosophy/Religion

Understanding Moral Problems
Representative problems of business, legal, medical, environmental, and personal ethics (e.g., violence, discrimination, capital punishment, abortion, euthanasia, conservation, sexual morality) are covered. Emphasis is placed on learning to think about and discuss these issues clearly and objectively, rather than on abstract ethical theories.
PHI3560 / 4 credits
Francis Fallon
Thurs., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 28–Dec. 18
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Religion and Psychology
In this study of psychology in relation to religion, students explore the definition of religion, its personal meaning to people, and its social and political meaning in the community. The importance of ritual is discussed, and conversion is examined to understand its meaning. The middle of the course focuses on such theorists as Freud, Jung, and Maslow and the role religion played in their theories. Finally, the role religion and culture play in psychotherapy and the difference between religions and cults are examined.
PSY3140 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Donna Hart
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 25–Dec. 15
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Spirituality and Nature
An exploration of writings, cultural traditions, activities, and lifestyles that involve spiritual interaction with nature. Through appreciating models of nature-consciousness, the goal is to deepen and sustain students’ awareness of the natural world, to develop actions and voices for expressing and clarifying that awareness in the present environmental context, and to modify environmentally destructive habits.
REL3400 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Suzanne Ironbiter
Wed., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 27–Dec. 17
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Buddhist Ideas and Practice
Investigates practical Indian, Tibetan, and Zen teachings and their relationship to meditative practice, somatic awareness, ethical engagement, and personal and collective well-being. Students evaluate how people learn, know, and do what is good, i.e., that which promotes individual and collective health and happiness. The effects and applications of these practices and teachings are also explored.
REL3450 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Suzanne Ironbiter
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 25–Dec. 15
Room: Refer to the online schedule

God’s Warriors: Religious Fundamentalism Today
Contemporary culture cannot be adequately understood without considering the impact of religious extremism. While other factors play a role, it is religious passions that fuel the jihadist movement in the Islamic world, incite violence in the occupied Palestinian territories, and amplify culture wars between secular and religious forces in the U.S. This course examines the root causes of such cultural phenomena, asking whether fundamentalism can exist in modern society without leading to bloodshed.
REL3500 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Michael Taub
Tues., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 26–Dec. 16
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Posted April 14, 2014

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