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Continuing Education - Undergraduate Credit
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Fall 2015 Credit Courses: Film

Middle Eastern Cultures: Texts and Films
Explores the various cultures, geography, and history of the Middle East, including Turkey, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Some time is also devoted to minorities within a larger context. The selected texts and films raise awareness of human rights issues as well as the political, ethnic, and national complexities of the region. Both fiction and nonfiction works are used.
ANT3330 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Michael Taub
Wed., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Sept. 2–Dec. 16
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Introduction to Video Techniques and Technology
This introduction to the art and science of video production focuses on developing visual literacy and postproduction skills. Starting with an examination of basic video technology and traditional media aesthetics, all stages of the video production process are covered. Students receive introductory technical training and hands-on experience with digital camcorders, microphones, and nonlinear editing equipment.
CMS1400 / 3 credits
Noncredit option: $520
Victoria DeMartin
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 31–Dec. 14
Room: Refer to the online schedule

East–West: Film and Literature of Cultural Formation
Students explore contemporary literary and cinematic expressions of immigrant groups seeking acceptance in Western cultures. The focus is on issues related to assimilation, identity, and the reactions of the Western mainstream cultures as outside forces compete for recognition. The immigrant groups depicted include those originating in Southeast Asia, China, Africa, and the Middle East.
CMS3080 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Michael Taub
Tues., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Sept. 1–Dec. 15
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Social Psychological Theory Applied Through Film
A discussion of the constructs, theories, and ideas in the field of social psychology that are most relevant to contemporary society. Films that are rich in examples of social psychological theory are analyzed to facilitate mastery of these concepts.
CMS3090 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Kenneth Mann
Tues., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Sept. 1–Dec. 15
Room: Refer to the online schedule

American Film, Reflections of a Century I: 1900 to 1949
Early films depict the transition from the Victorian era to the Industrial Age, the birth of big cities, the suffragette movement, and the development of narrative cinema. Topics include World War I and the introduction of the propaganda film, the wild Jazz Age, the cynical gangster movies, the protest films of the Depression era, and the rise of escapist films.
CMS3130 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Michael Garber
Wed., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Sept. 2–Dec. 16
Room: Refer to the online schedule

hybrid courses iconAmerican Subcultures in Film
What does it mean to be part of a subculture? This phenomenon is explored through film, focusing on subcultures that are usually not in the mainstream spotlight and analyzing what it means to live on the margins. The subcultures may include, for example, the Amish, big rig drivers, Scrabble champions, graffiti artists, quadriplegic athletes, prison inmates, and outsider artists.
Note: This course is a hybrid course (60 percent online and 40 percent in person). Classes meet on Sept. 3 and 24, Oct. 15, Nov. 5, Dec. 3 and 17. Please visit www.purchase.edu/online for details.
CMS3160 / 4 credits
Grant Wiedenfeld
Thurs., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Sept. 3–Dec. 17
Room: Refer to the online schedule

American Film, Reflections of a Century III: The 21st Century
Analyzes trends in American cultural history as reflected in the movies from 1990 onward, with an exploration of precursors. Topics include the digital age, globalism, millennialism, postmodernism, and what is to come in the future. Students examine connections between Western civilization and landmarks of film history—cinema mirroring society and vice versa.
CMS3200 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Michael Garber
Mon., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Aug. 31–Dec. 14
Room: Refer to the online schedule

A Critical Look at Television in Society: From “I Love Lucy” to Honey Boo Boo
Television is much more than a passive, incessant means of diversion—it is a powerful environment of ideas, emotions, and values that influences people’s thoughts, actions, and relationships. Students become acquainted with current issues concerning television in society and explore the impact of television on society. Aspects examined include the 1950s and mass culture, viewer response, serial/episodic structure, and the rise of cable.
CMS3700 / 4 credits
Noncredit option: $625
Adam Resnick
Tues., 6:30–9:50 p.m.
Sept. 1–Dec. 15
Room: Refer to the online schedule

Updated March 18, 2015

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